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Primeur weekly 2016-11-07

Focus

EGI to finalize service catalogue and ISO certification ...

Exascale supercomputing

SLAC and Berkeley Lab researchers prepare for scientific computing on the exascale ...

Quantum computing

Researchers nearly reached quantum limit with nanodrums ...

Focus on Europe

New approach for ARM-based technology to halve the cost of powering data centres ...

PRACE to award contracts in third and final phase of Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) ...

PRACE welcomes new Managing Director Serge Bogaerts ...

PRACE 2016 Digest Special Edition on Industry is out ...

Supercomputer comes up with a profile of dark matter ...

Middleware

Bright Computing supplies Bright OpenStack to Stony Brook University ...

DDN Annual High Performance Computing Trends survey reveals rising deployment of flash tiers and private/hybrid Clouds versus public for HPC ...

With Corral 3, TACC provides a more unified data structure and increased space ...

Hardware

Mellanox launches open source software initiative for routers, load balancers, and firewalls ...

Mellanox Multi-Host technology reshapes data centre economics ...

Cray awarded $26 million contract from the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Programme ...

Hewlett Packard Enterprise completes acquisition of SGI ...

Centre for Modelling & Simulation in Bristol launches new supercomputer ...

Baylor University selects Cray CS400 cluster supercomputer to power innovative research ...

SGI awarded $27 million systems contract with the Army Research Laboratory Defense Supercomputing Resource Center ...

Applications

XSEDE spins off annual conference to unite research computing community ...

Researchers at UCSB explore the delicate balance between coherence and control with a simple but complete platform for quantum processing ...

Cosmic connection: KITP's Greg Huber worked with nuclear physicists to confirm a structural similarity found in both human cells and neutron stars ...

New technique for creating NV-doped nanodiamonds may be boost for quantum computing ...

New bacteria groups, and stunning diversity, discovered underground ...

The Cloud

IBM drives Cloud storage with new all-flash and software defined solutions ...

Capital markets firms continue to invest in hardware for compute Grids alongside growing Cloud adoption, according to TABB Group Research ...

New technique for creating NV-doped nanodiamonds may be boost for quantum computing

2 Nov 2016 Raleigh - Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new technique for creating NV-doped single-crystal nanodiamonds, only four to eight nanometers wide, which could serve as components in room-temperature quantum computing technologies. These doped nanodiamonds also hold promise for use in single-photon sensors and nontoxic, fluorescent biomarkers.

Currently, computers use binary logic, in which each binary unit - or bit - is in one of two states: 1 or 0. Quantum computing makes use of superposition and entanglement, allowing the creation of quantum bits - or qubits - which can have a vast number of possible states. Quantum computing has the potential to significantly increase computing power and speed.

A number of options have been explored for creating quantum computing systems, including the use of diamonds that have "nitrogen-vacancy" centres. That's where this research comes in.

Normally, diamond has a very specific crystalline structure, consisting of repeated diamond tetrahedrons, or cubes. Each cube contains five carbon atoms. The NC State research team has developed a new technique for creating diamond tetrahedrons that have two carbon atoms; one vacancy, where an atom is missing; one carbon-13 atom - a stable carbon isotope that has six protons and seven neutrons; and one nitrogen atom. This is called the NV centre. Each NV-doped nanodiamond contains thousands of atoms, but has only one NV center; the remainder of the tetrahedrons in the nanodiamond are made solely of carbon.

It's an atomically small distinction, but it makes a big difference.

"That little dot, the NV centre, turns the nanodiamond into a qubit", stated Jay Narayan, the John C. Fan Distinguished Chair Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State and lead author of a paper describing the work. "Each NV centre has two transitions: NV0 and NV. We can go back and forth between these two states using electric current or laser. These nanodiamonds could serve as the basic building blocks of a quantum computer."

To create these NV-doped nanodiamonds, the researchers start with a substrate, such as such as sapphire, glass or a plastic polymer. The substrate is then coated with amorphous carbon - elemental carbon that, unlike graphite or diamond, does not have a regular, well-defined crystalline structure. While depositing the film of amorphous carbon, the researchers bombard it with nitrogen ions and carbon-13 ions. The carbon is then hit with a laser pulse that raises the temperature of the carbon to approximately 4,000 Kelvin (or around 3,727 degrees Celsius) and is then rapidly quenched. The operation is completed within a millionth of a second and takes place at one atmosphere - the same pressure as the surrounding air. By using different substrates and changing the duration of the laser pulse, the researchers can control how quickly the carbon cools, which allows them to create the nanodiamond structures.

"Our approach reduces impurities; controls the size of the NV-doped nanodiamond; allows us to place the nanodiamonds with a fair amount of precision; and directly incorporates carbon-13 into the material, which is necessary for creating the entanglement required in quantum computing", Jay Narayan stated. "All of the nanodiamonds are exactly aligned through the paradigm of domain matching epitaxy, which is a significant advance over existing techniques for creating NV-doped nanodiamonds."

"The new technique not only offers unprecedented control and uniformity in the NV-doped nanodiamonds, it is also less expensive than existing techniques", Jay Narayan stated. "Hopefully, this will enable significant advances in the field of quantum computing."

The researchers are currently talking with government and private sector groups about how to move forward. One area of interest is to develop a means of creating self-assembling systems that incorporate entangled NV-doped nanodiamonds for quantum computing.

The paper, " Novel synthesis and properties of pure and NV-doped nanodiamonds and other nanostructures ", is published in the journalMaterials Research Letters. The paper was co-authored by Anagh Bhaumik, a Ph.D. student at NC State. The work was supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under grant W911NF-12-R-0012-03.

Source: North Carolina State University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-11-07

Focus

EGI to finalize service catalogue and ISO certification ...

Exascale supercomputing

SLAC and Berkeley Lab researchers prepare for scientific computing on the exascale ...

Quantum computing

Researchers nearly reached quantum limit with nanodrums ...

Focus on Europe

New approach for ARM-based technology to halve the cost of powering data centres ...

PRACE to award contracts in third and final phase of Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) ...

PRACE welcomes new Managing Director Serge Bogaerts ...

PRACE 2016 Digest Special Edition on Industry is out ...

Supercomputer comes up with a profile of dark matter ...

Middleware

Bright Computing supplies Bright OpenStack to Stony Brook University ...

DDN Annual High Performance Computing Trends survey reveals rising deployment of flash tiers and private/hybrid Clouds versus public for HPC ...

With Corral 3, TACC provides a more unified data structure and increased space ...

Hardware

Mellanox launches open source software initiative for routers, load balancers, and firewalls ...

Mellanox Multi-Host technology reshapes data centre economics ...

Cray awarded $26 million contract from the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Programme ...

Hewlett Packard Enterprise completes acquisition of SGI ...

Centre for Modelling & Simulation in Bristol launches new supercomputer ...

Baylor University selects Cray CS400 cluster supercomputer to power innovative research ...

SGI awarded $27 million systems contract with the Army Research Laboratory Defense Supercomputing Resource Center ...

Applications

XSEDE spins off annual conference to unite research computing community ...

Researchers at UCSB explore the delicate balance between coherence and control with a simple but complete platform for quantum processing ...

Cosmic connection: KITP's Greg Huber worked with nuclear physicists to confirm a structural similarity found in both human cells and neutron stars ...

New technique for creating NV-doped nanodiamonds may be boost for quantum computing ...

New bacteria groups, and stunning diversity, discovered underground ...

The Cloud

IBM drives Cloud storage with new all-flash and software defined solutions ...

Capital markets firms continue to invest in hardware for compute Grids alongside growing Cloud adoption, according to TABB Group Research ...