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Primeur weekly 2011-11-07

The Cloud

Oracle named a leader in SOA Governance Magic Quadrant by Gartner analyst firm

Cerner selects Oracle Enterprise Manager to support new Cloud services

Gartner positions Oracle as a leader in the Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Application Servers

EuroFlash

Argonne National Labs selects Allinea DDT for Blue Gene and Linux - Debugging tools evolution to support petascale and exascale

Russian supercomputer developer and solution builder RSC joins European HPC association PROSPECT

PRACE grants 18 million compute hours for Finnish research groups - new call opens

IBM and ABB scientists collaborate to improve energy transmission for more efficient grids

Vestas Wind Systems turns to IBM Big Data Analytics for smarter wind energy

USFlash

K computer achieves goal of 10 Petaflops

University of Wisconsin–Madison home to weather-predicting supercomputer

IBM rolls out first solar array designed for high-voltage data centres and industrial use

HP shapes the future of extreme low-energy server technology

Appro reveals next generation, Xtreme-X supercomputer to support future processor technologies

IBM Watson heads to Harvard, MIT to explore future of technology in business

Researchers find molecule that prevents type 1 diabetes in mice

Institute for Chemical Research at Kyoto University selects SGI to advance computational chemistry and biological research

Global industry leaders tackle data explosion with SGI storage solutions

Cray Inc. reports third quarter 2011 financial results

Sandia wins national awards for cutting water use 30 percent, pursuing other energy savings

China adds another supercomputer to its roster

Not one, not two, not three, but four clones

Researchers find molecule that prevents type 1 diabetes in mice

1 Nov 2011 Aurora - Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have found a specific molecule that can prevent the development of type 1 diabetes in mice and has a similar effect on human cells from diabetic patients.

The findings, published in the latest edition ofThe Journal of Immunology, signal a new and promising direction in the fight against type I diabetes along with other auto-immune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and celiac disease.

Aaron Michels, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics and medicine, working with George Eisenbarth., MD, Ph.D., executive director of the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the CU School of Medicine, tested a series of molecules before finding one that stopped diabetes from developing in mice bred to get the disease.

"We found that when you put specific molecules into specific structural pockets you can block the formation of diabetes", stated George Eisenbarth. "We are basically throwing a monkey wrench into the machinery."

The researchers were looking for small molecules capable of occupying pockets along a protein binding groove. Some of the molecules got into these pockets and inhibited the presentation of insulin to immune cells while others enhanced it.

Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the body’s inability to manufacture insulin because its own immune system is attacking it. The incidence of the disease has doubled in each of the last two decades.

Aaron Michels and George Eisenbarth found that the compound Glyphosine enhanced insulin presentation and prevented diabetes in mice genetically modified to develop type 1diabetes. It had the same effect on human cells. The mice remained disease-free as long as they received daily injections of the compound. It was not as effective on mice that already had diabetes.

The molecules used in the research were obtained with the assistance of the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville.

"Our role was to screen a large chemical library to identify drug candidates for prevention of type 1 diabetes", stated David Ostrov, Ph.D., associate professor of pathology, immunology and laboratory medicine at the University of Florida. "We developed a novel screening method that pinpoints very specific areas of a protein that is genetically associated with type 1 diabetes."

Using a supercomputer, David Ostrov's lab ran tests on 139,735 drug candidates to see which were most likely to bind on the four critical pockets of the protein.

"Not only does this provide a new way to change specific immune responses in a manner that is beneficial for diabetes, this shows that we may be able to modify specific immune responses for other auto-immune diseases", David Ostrov stated. "This is also relevant to cancer and infectious diseases where it would be beneficial to modify specific immune responses rather than in a general way."

Aaron Michels said that based on the two and a half year study, it would be feasible to genetically screen individuals likely to develop type 1 diabetes and begin a therapy regimen using these compounds to prevent the onset of the disease. Right now, doctors can predict who will get type 1diabetes about 90 percent of the time.

"This technique would also apply to other auto-immune disorders like arthritis and celiac disease", Aaron Michels stated. "The principals are the same."

The next step is to focus specifically on human cells to try and develop new therapies for clinical use. That could be at least five years away.
Source: University of Coloarado - Denver

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2011-11-07

The Cloud

Oracle named a leader in SOA Governance Magic Quadrant by Gartner analyst firm

Cerner selects Oracle Enterprise Manager to support new Cloud services

Gartner positions Oracle as a leader in the Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Application Servers

EuroFlash

Argonne National Labs selects Allinea DDT for Blue Gene and Linux - Debugging tools evolution to support petascale and exascale

Russian supercomputer developer and solution builder RSC joins European HPC association PROSPECT

PRACE grants 18 million compute hours for Finnish research groups - new call opens

IBM and ABB scientists collaborate to improve energy transmission for more efficient grids

Vestas Wind Systems turns to IBM Big Data Analytics for smarter wind energy

USFlash

K computer achieves goal of 10 Petaflops

University of Wisconsin–Madison home to weather-predicting supercomputer

IBM rolls out first solar array designed for high-voltage data centres and industrial use

HP shapes the future of extreme low-energy server technology

Appro reveals next generation, Xtreme-X supercomputer to support future processor technologies

IBM Watson heads to Harvard, MIT to explore future of technology in business

Researchers find molecule that prevents type 1 diabetes in mice

Institute for Chemical Research at Kyoto University selects SGI to advance computational chemistry and biological research

Global industry leaders tackle data explosion with SGI storage solutions

Cray Inc. reports third quarter 2011 financial results

Sandia wins national awards for cutting water use 30 percent, pursuing other energy savings

China adds another supercomputer to its roster

Not one, not two, not three, but four clones