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Primeur weekly 2020-10-12

Focus

Future of European HPC and TOP500 in the picture at Russian Supercomputing Days ...

Two European approaches for modelling and mapping the COVID-19 pandemic ...

European-Brazilian consortium joins forces in advanced HPC wind turbine simulations for use in on- and offshore wind energy farms ...

Exascale supercomputing

PerMedCoE: Exascale-ready cell-level simulations for European Personalised Medicine ...

Quantum computing

New algorithm could unleash the power of quantum computers ...

Light Rider unveils quantum LiFi technology to create next-generation network security ...

Research and Markets to issue report on Quantum Networking: A Ten-year Forecast and Opportunity Analysis ...

Focus on Europe

Linköping University chooses Atos to build Sweden's largest supercomputer for AI ...

Atos inaugurates BullSequana XH2000 at CSC - the fastest supercomputer in the Nordics ...

Making supercomputers carbon neutral - CSC's data centre will be powered with hydro-electricity supplied by Vattenfall ...

Middleware

Verne Global achieves Dell Technologies Platinum Partner status ...

Altair acquires M-Base Engineering + Software GmbH, leader in plastics material data and technology ...

Hardware

CoolIT Systems launches rack DLC CHx200 CDU ...

NVIDIA introduces new family of BlueField DPUs to bring breakthrough networking, storage and security performance to every data centre ...

CoolIT prevails against Asetek, PTAB determines no challenged claims unpatentable ...

CMKL University implementing DDN and NVIDIA solution for AI-centric supercomputing and research ...

OpenFive and AnalogX to provide optimized Chip-to-Chip interface IP solutions ...

Defense and intelligence executive Melvin Cordova joined Tachyum Government Corp. ...

TrendForce announces tech industry trends for 2021 ...

Cerebras Systems appoints Tony Maslowski as Chief Financial Officer ...

DoD deploys three Liqid composable supercomputing facilities powered by NVIDIA A100 GPU computing and NVIDIA Mellanox HDR 200Gb/s InfiniBand smart networking ...

Panasas ActiveStor data storage supports materials research for dozens of scientists conducting intensive 4D modelling studies at MINES ParisTech University ...

Pavilion expands a US federal deployment, bringing the multi-year relationship to an eight-figure investment, to safeguard American lives ...

C-DAC to commission India's fastest HPC-AI supercomputer PARAM Siddhi - AI with NVIDIA ...

NVIDIA announces partnership with GSK's AI-powered Lab for Discovery of Medicines and Vaccines ...

NVIDIA announces ready-made NVIDIA DGX SuperPODs, offered by global network of certified partners ...

Supermicro expands its portfolio bringing highest density 4U server with NVIDIA HGX A100s 8-GPU and 8U SuperBlade supporting 20 A100 PCI-E GPUs ...

Supermicro to support NVIDIA Bluefield-2 DPU on industry's broadest portfolio of servers optimized for accelerated computational workloads in AI, AR/DR, and data analytics ...

Applications

NVIDIA building large computing system, dedicated to AI research in health care ...

An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons ...

Could megatesla magnetic fields be realized on Earth? ...

Top computer scientists and statisticians launch Foundations of Data Science conference ...

Comet supercomputer calculations boost understanding of immune system ...

Corona supercomputer gets funding for COVID-19 work ...

Steady progress in the battle against COVID-19 at Brookhaven National Laboratory ...

Texascale Days at TACC: Eight research teams test their codes at the largest scale on Frontera ...

Supercomputing helps advance predictive science, exascale computing ...

The Cloud

Inspur unveils Cloud SmartNIC solution based on NVIDIA DPU at GTC 2020 ...

An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons


A map shows the intensity and locations of photons emitted from a thin film material while a voltage is applied. Credit: Berkeley Lab.
8 Oct 2020 Berkeley - Secure telecommunications networks and rapid information processing make much of modern life possible. To provide more secure, faster, and higher-performance information sharing than is currently possible, scientists and engineers are designing next-generation devices that harness the rules of quantum physics. Those designs rely on single photons to encode and transmit information across quantum networks and between quantum chips. However, tools for generating single photons do not yet offer the precision and stability required for quantum information technology.

Now, as reported recently in the journal Science Advances , researchers have found a way to generate single, identical photons on demand. By positioning a metallic probe over a designated point in a common 2D semiconductor material, the team led by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has triggered a photon emission electrically. The photon's properties may be simply adjusted by changing the applied voltage.

"The demonstration of electrically driven single-photon emission at a precise point constitutes a big step in the quest for integrable quantum technologies", stated Alex Weber-Bargioni, a staff scientist at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry who led the project. The research is part of the Center for Novel Pathways to Quantum Coherence in Materials (NPQC), an Energy Frontier Research Center sponsored by the Department of Energy, whose overarching goal is to find new approaches to protect and control quantum memory that can provide new insights into novel materials and designs for quantum computing technology.

Photons are one of the most robust carriers of quantum information and can travel long distances without losing their memory, or so-called coherence. To date, most established schemes for secure communication transfer that will power large-scale quantum communications require light sources to generate one photon at a time. Each photon must have a precisely defined wavelength and orientation. The new photon emitter demonstrated at Berkeley Lab achieves that control and precision. It could be used for transferring information between quantum processors on different chips, and ultimately scaled up to larger processors and a future quantum internet that links sophisticated computers around the world.

The photon emitter is based on a common 2D semiconductor material (tungsten disulfide, WS2), which has a sulfur atom removed from its crystal structure. That carefully located atomic imperfection, or defect, serves as a point where the photon can be generated through application of an electric current.

The challenge is not how to generate single photons, but how to make them truly identical and produce them on demand. Photon-emitting devices, like the semiconductor nanoparticles or "quantum dots" that light up QLED TVs, that are fabricated by lithography are subject to inherent variability, since no pattern-based system can be identical down to a single atom. Researchers working with Alex Weber-Bargioni took a different approach by growing a thin-film material on a sheet of graphene. Any impurities introduced to the thin film's atomic structure are repeated and identical throughout the sample. Through simulations and experiments, the team determined just where to introduce an imperfection to the otherwise uniform structure. Then, by applying an electrical contact to that location, they were able to trigger the material to emit a photon and control its energy with the applied voltage. That photon is then available to carry information to a distant location.

"Single-photon emitters are like a terminal where carefully prepared but fragile quantum information is sent on a journey into a lightning-fast, sturdy box", stated Bruno Schuler, a postdoctoral researcher at the Molecular Foundry, now a research scientist at Empa - the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, and lead author of the work.

Key to the experiment is the gold-coated tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope that can be positioned exactly over the defect site in the thin film material. When a voltage is applied between the probe tip and the sample, the tip injects an electron into the defect. When the electron travels or tunnels from the probe tip, a well-defined part of its energy gets transformed into a single photon. Finally, the probe tip acts as an antenna that helps guide the emitted photon to an optical detector which records its wavelength and position.

By mapping the photons emitted from thin films made to include various defects, the researchers were able to pinpoint the correlation between the injected electron, local atomic structure, and the emitted photon. Usually, the optical resolution of such a map is limited to a few hundred nanometers. Thanks to extremely localized electron injection, combined with state-of-the-art microscopy tools, the Berkeley Lab team could determine where in the material a photon emerged with a resolution below 1 angstrom, about the diameter of a single atom. The detailed photon maps were crucial to pinpointing and understanding the electron-triggered photon emission mechanism.

"In terms of technique, this work has been a great breakthrough because we can map light emission from a single defect with sub-nanometer resolution. We visualize light emission with atomic resolution", stated Katherine Cochrane, a postdoctoral researcher at the Molecular Foundry and a lead author on the paper.

Defining single-photon light sources in two-dimensional materials with atomic precision provides unprecedented insight critical to understanding how those sources work, and provides a strategy for making groups of perfectly identical ones. The work is part of NPQC's focus on exploring novel quantum phenomena in non-homogenous 2D materials.

Two-dimensional materials are leading the way as a powerful platform for next-generation photon emitters. The thin films are flexible and easily integrated with other structures, and now provide a systematic way for introducing unparalleled control over photon emission. Based on the new results, the researchers plan to work on employing new materials to use as photon sources in quantum networks and quantum simulations.

This research was supported by the DOE Office of Science and grants from the Swiss National Science Foundation.
Source: DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2020-10-12

Focus

Future of European HPC and TOP500 in the picture at Russian Supercomputing Days ...

Two European approaches for modelling and mapping the COVID-19 pandemic ...

European-Brazilian consortium joins forces in advanced HPC wind turbine simulations for use in on- and offshore wind energy farms ...

Exascale supercomputing

PerMedCoE: Exascale-ready cell-level simulations for European Personalised Medicine ...

Quantum computing

New algorithm could unleash the power of quantum computers ...

Light Rider unveils quantum LiFi technology to create next-generation network security ...

Research and Markets to issue report on Quantum Networking: A Ten-year Forecast and Opportunity Analysis ...

Focus on Europe

Linköping University chooses Atos to build Sweden's largest supercomputer for AI ...

Atos inaugurates BullSequana XH2000 at CSC - the fastest supercomputer in the Nordics ...

Making supercomputers carbon neutral - CSC's data centre will be powered with hydro-electricity supplied by Vattenfall ...

Middleware

Verne Global achieves Dell Technologies Platinum Partner status ...

Altair acquires M-Base Engineering + Software GmbH, leader in plastics material data and technology ...

Hardware

CoolIT Systems launches rack DLC CHx200 CDU ...

NVIDIA introduces new family of BlueField DPUs to bring breakthrough networking, storage and security performance to every data centre ...

CoolIT prevails against Asetek, PTAB determines no challenged claims unpatentable ...

CMKL University implementing DDN and NVIDIA solution for AI-centric supercomputing and research ...

OpenFive and AnalogX to provide optimized Chip-to-Chip interface IP solutions ...

Defense and intelligence executive Melvin Cordova joined Tachyum Government Corp. ...

TrendForce announces tech industry trends for 2021 ...

Cerebras Systems appoints Tony Maslowski as Chief Financial Officer ...

DoD deploys three Liqid composable supercomputing facilities powered by NVIDIA A100 GPU computing and NVIDIA Mellanox HDR 200Gb/s InfiniBand smart networking ...

Panasas ActiveStor data storage supports materials research for dozens of scientists conducting intensive 4D modelling studies at MINES ParisTech University ...

Pavilion expands a US federal deployment, bringing the multi-year relationship to an eight-figure investment, to safeguard American lives ...

C-DAC to commission India's fastest HPC-AI supercomputer PARAM Siddhi - AI with NVIDIA ...

NVIDIA announces partnership with GSK's AI-powered Lab for Discovery of Medicines and Vaccines ...

NVIDIA announces ready-made NVIDIA DGX SuperPODs, offered by global network of certified partners ...

Supermicro expands its portfolio bringing highest density 4U server with NVIDIA HGX A100s 8-GPU and 8U SuperBlade supporting 20 A100 PCI-E GPUs ...

Supermicro to support NVIDIA Bluefield-2 DPU on industry's broadest portfolio of servers optimized for accelerated computational workloads in AI, AR/DR, and data analytics ...

Applications

NVIDIA building large computing system, dedicated to AI research in health care ...

An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons ...

Could megatesla magnetic fields be realized on Earth? ...

Top computer scientists and statisticians launch Foundations of Data Science conference ...

Comet supercomputer calculations boost understanding of immune system ...

Corona supercomputer gets funding for COVID-19 work ...

Steady progress in the battle against COVID-19 at Brookhaven National Laboratory ...

Texascale Days at TACC: Eight research teams test their codes at the largest scale on Frontera ...

Supercomputing helps advance predictive science, exascale computing ...

The Cloud

Inspur unveils Cloud SmartNIC solution based on NVIDIA DPU at GTC 2020 ...