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Primeur weekly 2019-10-14

Focus

Hyperion Research's Steve Conway on exascale developments and HPC technology trends world wide at the HPC User Forum in Edinburgh ...

Exascale supercomputing

First Annual Exascale Day celebrates discoveries on the fastest supercomputers in the world ...

ExaNoDe builds groundbreaking 3D prototype of compute element for exascale ...

Exascale Computing Market by Hardware, Software, Services, and Industry Vertical 2019-2024: The $2,4 billion global Exascale computing market is expanding to smaller companies ...

Quantum computing

The ICN2 and Microsoft expand partnership in quantum computing research ...

Physicists couple key components of quantum technologies ...

Focus on Europe

The EOSC Symposium call for contributions is open ...

Infrastructure Advisory Group to host Workshop on EuroHPC Systems Access Policy ...

ERC Synergy Grant: 12 million euro for research into 'magic' 3D nanostructures ...

Croatia becomes an Associate Member of CERN ...

UK Research and Innovation to award Cray with hardware contract for national supercomputer ARCHER2 ...

Middleware

WekaIO awarded patent ...

Hardware

The University of Queensland uses Dell Technologies supercomputer to pioneer new Alzheimer's Disease breakthrough ...

Mellanox releases independent report demonstrating ConnectX Ethernet NICs outperform competition and ships first ConnectX-6 Dx secure SmartNICs ...

CAIDA's KC Claffy inducted into Internet Hall of Fame ...

Lenovo and Intel power computational research at the Flatiron Institute ...

Arm enables Custom Instructions for embedded CPUs ...

General Micro Systems (GMS) launches S1202-XVE, the industry's smallest and lightest video server with Artificial Intelligence for rugged military & industrial applications ...

Samsung Electronics develops industry's first 12-layer 3D-TSV chip packaging technology ...

Tachyum CEO Dr. Radoslav Danilak named IT Person of the Year at IT GALA ...

Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal ...

Applications

Princeton's new supercomputer, Traverse, to accelerate scientific discovery in fusion research ...

MIT's CSAIL Lab and CAIDA identify "serial hijackers" of internet IP addresses ...

Summit supercomputer simulates how humans will 'brake' during Mars landing ...

Scientists observe a single quantum vibration under ordinary conditions ...

Study reveals limitations of method for determining protein structure ...

Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material ...

Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work ...

The Cloud

University of North Dakota deploys Bright Cluster Manager for HPC, Data Science, and the Cloud on HPE Apollo 6500 Gen10 system ...

Atos delivers faster Cloud adoption with new SyntBots accelerators for Pivotal Platform ...

Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work


Coloured SEM image of the SNS nanobolometer. The dark oval at the bottom left represents a 1,3-micrometer-long Ralstonia mannitolilytica bacterium. Credit: Roope Kokkoniemi/Aalto University.
11 Oct 2019 Aalto - Researchers from Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have built a super-sensitive bolometer, a type of thermal radiation detector. The new radiation detector, made of a gold-palladium mixture makes it easier to measure the strength of electromagnetic radiation in real time. Bolometers are used widely in thermal cameras in the construction industry and in satellites to measure cosmic radiation.

The new developments may help bolometers find their way to quantum computers. If the new radiation detector manages to function as well in space as it does in the laboratory, it can also be used to measure cosmic microwave background radiation in space more accurately.

"The new detector is extremely sensitive, and its noise level - how much the signal bounces around the correct value, is only one tenth of the noise of any other bolometer. It is also a hundred times faster than previous low-noise radiation detectors", stated Mikko Möttönen, who works as a joint Professor of Quantum Technology at Aalto University and VTT.

At first, the research group built a radiation detector out of gold, but it broke in a few weeks, because gold is not compatible with the aluminium which is used as a superconductor in the detector. To overcome this, the group started to use a mixture of gold and palladium, which is very durable but a rare material in bolometers.

"In addition to the material, the secret of the new radiation detector lies in its really small scale. The nanowire running through the middle of the radiation detector is only about a micrometre long, two hundred nanometres wide and a few tens of nanometres thic", stated Roope Kokkoniemi, who studied the bolometer at Aalto University.

A bolometer works by measuring the heating effect of radiation. When a bolometer heats up, its electrical characteristics change, and this can be measured with high precision. The smaller the bolometer, the less radiation is required to heat it.

"A small radiation detector has a low heat capacity, so weak radiation provides a stronger signal", Roope Kokkoniemi explained.

"Quantum computers operate in cryostats, extremely cold super-freezers, in which even the smallest amount of excess radiation causes a lot of disturbance. As nanobolometers are very sensitive, they could conveniently measure the level of excess radiation in the cryostat in order to reduce the radiation through better protection", Mikko Möttönen stated.

The bolometer could also be used to read the value of quantum bits, or qubits. However, for this purpose, the bolometer would need to be even faster.

"In order to read quantum information in superconducting quantum computers several times in a row without it degrading in between, the bolometer would have to be about a hundred times faster", Mikko Möttönen stated.

Microwave amplifiers were also developed in the research. Their task is to strengthen the signal, but they also add noise. The superconducting microwave amplifier developed by VTT succeeded to halve the bolometer noise in comparison to the best commercial amplifier used.

The bolometer was developed in the Quantum Computing and Devices research group led by Mikko Möttönen. The article was published in the Communications Physics journal on the 11th of October.

Source: Aalto University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-10-14

Focus

Hyperion Research's Steve Conway on exascale developments and HPC technology trends world wide at the HPC User Forum in Edinburgh ...

Exascale supercomputing

First Annual Exascale Day celebrates discoveries on the fastest supercomputers in the world ...

ExaNoDe builds groundbreaking 3D prototype of compute element for exascale ...

Exascale Computing Market by Hardware, Software, Services, and Industry Vertical 2019-2024: The $2,4 billion global Exascale computing market is expanding to smaller companies ...

Quantum computing

The ICN2 and Microsoft expand partnership in quantum computing research ...

Physicists couple key components of quantum technologies ...

Focus on Europe

The EOSC Symposium call for contributions is open ...

Infrastructure Advisory Group to host Workshop on EuroHPC Systems Access Policy ...

ERC Synergy Grant: 12 million euro for research into 'magic' 3D nanostructures ...

Croatia becomes an Associate Member of CERN ...

UK Research and Innovation to award Cray with hardware contract for national supercomputer ARCHER2 ...

Middleware

WekaIO awarded patent ...

Hardware

The University of Queensland uses Dell Technologies supercomputer to pioneer new Alzheimer's Disease breakthrough ...

Mellanox releases independent report demonstrating ConnectX Ethernet NICs outperform competition and ships first ConnectX-6 Dx secure SmartNICs ...

CAIDA's KC Claffy inducted into Internet Hall of Fame ...

Lenovo and Intel power computational research at the Flatiron Institute ...

Arm enables Custom Instructions for embedded CPUs ...

General Micro Systems (GMS) launches S1202-XVE, the industry's smallest and lightest video server with Artificial Intelligence for rugged military & industrial applications ...

Samsung Electronics develops industry's first 12-layer 3D-TSV chip packaging technology ...

Tachyum CEO Dr. Radoslav Danilak named IT Person of the Year at IT GALA ...

Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal ...

Applications

Princeton's new supercomputer, Traverse, to accelerate scientific discovery in fusion research ...

MIT's CSAIL Lab and CAIDA identify "serial hijackers" of internet IP addresses ...

Summit supercomputer simulates how humans will 'brake' during Mars landing ...

Scientists observe a single quantum vibration under ordinary conditions ...

Study reveals limitations of method for determining protein structure ...

Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material ...

Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work ...

The Cloud

University of North Dakota deploys Bright Cluster Manager for HPC, Data Science, and the Cloud on HPE Apollo 6500 Gen10 system ...

Atos delivers faster Cloud adoption with new SyntBots accelerators for Pivotal Platform ...