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Primeur weekly 2018-10-08

Special

Where did the first 500 million euro invested by the European Horizon 2020 programme go? ...

Focus

World's first ARM-based supercomputer Isambard is ready for science ...

Exascale supercomputing

New European project ESCAPE-2 on exascale computing for numerical weather prediction gets under way ...

Berkeley Lab, Oak Ridge, and NVIDIA team breaks exaop barrier with deep learning application ...

Coming soon to exascale computing: Software for chemistry of catalysis ...

Quantum computing

ORNL researchers advance quantum computing, science through six DOE awards ...

Berkeley Lab to build an advanced quantum computing testbed ...

Berkeley Lab to push quantum information frontiers with new programmes in computing, physics, materials, and chemistry ...

Berkeley Quantum to accelerate innovation in quantum information science ...

Quantum software company Zapata Computing adds Clark Golestani to Board ...

Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber ...

Focus on Europe

Atos and the University of Reims launch ROMEO, one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, under the sponsorship of Cedric Villani ...

Special Edition of Open e-IRG Workshop under the Austrian EU Presidency will focus on relationship between Open Science, FAIR data and EOSC ...

Goethe University to develop green supercomputer for science ...

Calling on HPC experts and enthusiasts to propose tutorials and workshops for ISC 2019 ...

ISC 2019 calls for research paper submission by December 12, 2018 ...

Middleware

USC ISI to pilot Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence for National Science Foundation ...

Hardware

Tintri co-founder Mark Gritter joins Tintri by DDN as CTO to lead analytics and server virtualization vision ...

DDN simplifies the AI data centre with NVIDIA ...

New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing ...

Applications

New simulation sheds light on spiraling supermassive black holes ...

DNA unzipped, turned around, and rezipped ...

Dark Energy Survey releases first year value-added data products ...

A quantum leap toward expanding the search for dark matter ...

HP-CONCORD paves the way for scalable machine learning in HPC ...

In disaster's wake, novel computing techniques support emergency responders ...

Transition metal dichalcogenides could increase computer speed, memory by a million times ...

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI ...

Rochester Institute of Technology leads multi-university collaboration to simulate neutron star mergers ...

The Cloud

Oracle rolls out Autonomous NoSQL Database service ...

Quanta Cloud Technology showcases AI portfolio options at GTC Europe ...

ZeroStack delivers GPU-as-a-Service via NVIDIA hardware ...

Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber

Illustration of optical polarization of defect spin in silicon carbide Credit: Tom Bosma, University of Groningen.1 Oct 2018 Groningen - An international team of scientists led by the University of Groningen's Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials has identified a way to create quantum bits that emit photons that describe their state at wavelengths close to those used by telecom providers. These qubits are based on silicon carbide in which molybdenum impurities create colour centres. The results were published in the journalnpj Quantum Informationon October 1.

By using phenomena like superposition and entanglement, quantum computing and quantum communication promise superior computing powers and unbreakable cryptography. Several successes in transmitting these quantum phenomena through optical fibers have been reported, but this is typically at wavelengths that are incompatible with the standard fibers currently used in worldwide data transmission.

Physicists from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands together with colleagues from Linköping University and semiconductor company Norstel AB, both in Sweden, have now published the construction of a qubit that transmits information on its status at a wavelength of 1,100 nanometers. Furthermore, the mechanism involved can likely be tuned to wavelengths near those used in data transmission (around 1,300 or 1,500 nanometers).

The work started with defects in silicon carbon crystals, explains PhD student Tom Bosma, first author of the paper. "Silicon carbide is a semiconductor, and much work has been done to prevent impurities that affect the properties of the crystals. As a result, there is a huge library of impurities and their impact on the crystal." But these impurities are exactly what Tom Bosma and his colleagues need: they can form what are known as colour centres, and these respond to light of specific wavelengths.

When lasers are used to shine light at the right energy onto these colour centres, electrons in the outer shell of the molybdenum atoms in the silicon carbide crystals are kicked to a higher energy level. When they return to the ground state, they emit their excess energy as a photon. "For molybdenum impurities, these will be infrared photons, with wavelengths near the ones used in data communication", explained Tom Bosma.

This material was the starting point for constructing qubits, says fellow PhD student Carmem Gilardoni, who did a lot of the theoretical work in the paper. "We used a technique called coherent population trapping to create superposition in the colour centres." This involved using a property of electrons called spin, a quantum mechanical phenomenon that gives the electrons a magnetic moment which can point up or down. This creates a qubit in which the spin states represent 0 or 1.

Carmem Gilardoni stated: "If you apply a magnetic field, the spins align either parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field. The interesting thing is that as a result the ground state for electrons with spin up or spin down is slightly different." When laser light is used to excite the electrons, they subsequently fall back to one of the two ground states. The team, led by Professor in Physics of Quantum Devices Caspar van der Wal, used two lasers, each tuned to move electrons from one of the ground states to the same level of excitation, to create a situation in which a superposition of both spin states evolved in the colour centre.

Tom Bosma stated: "After some fine tuning, we managed to produce a qubit in which we had a long-lasting superposition combined with fast switching." Furthermore, the qubit emitted photons with information on the quantum state at infrared wavelengths. Given the large library of impurities that can create colour centres in the silicon carbide crystals, the team is confident they can bring this wavelength up to the levels used in standard optical fibers. If they can manage this and produce an even more stable - and thus longer-lasting - superposition, the quantum internet will be a whole lot closer to becoming reality.

Tom Bosma, Gerrit J.J. Lof, Carmem M. Gilardoni, Olger V. Zwier, Freddie Hendriks, Björn Magnusson, Alexandre Ellison, Andreas Gällström, Ivan G. Ivanov, N.T. Son, Remco W.A. Havenith and Caspar H. van der Wal are the authors of the paper titled " Identification and tunable optical coherent control of transition-metal spins in silicon carbide ". The paper was published innpj Quantum Informationon 1 October 2018.
Source: University of Groningen

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-10-08

Special

Where did the first 500 million euro invested by the European Horizon 2020 programme go? ...

Focus

World's first ARM-based supercomputer Isambard is ready for science ...

Exascale supercomputing

New European project ESCAPE-2 on exascale computing for numerical weather prediction gets under way ...

Berkeley Lab, Oak Ridge, and NVIDIA team breaks exaop barrier with deep learning application ...

Coming soon to exascale computing: Software for chemistry of catalysis ...

Quantum computing

ORNL researchers advance quantum computing, science through six DOE awards ...

Berkeley Lab to build an advanced quantum computing testbed ...

Berkeley Lab to push quantum information frontiers with new programmes in computing, physics, materials, and chemistry ...

Berkeley Quantum to accelerate innovation in quantum information science ...

Quantum software company Zapata Computing adds Clark Golestani to Board ...

Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber ...

Focus on Europe

Atos and the University of Reims launch ROMEO, one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, under the sponsorship of Cedric Villani ...

Special Edition of Open e-IRG Workshop under the Austrian EU Presidency will focus on relationship between Open Science, FAIR data and EOSC ...

Goethe University to develop green supercomputer for science ...

Calling on HPC experts and enthusiasts to propose tutorials and workshops for ISC 2019 ...

ISC 2019 calls for research paper submission by December 12, 2018 ...

Middleware

USC ISI to pilot Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence for National Science Foundation ...

Hardware

Tintri co-founder Mark Gritter joins Tintri by DDN as CTO to lead analytics and server virtualization vision ...

DDN simplifies the AI data centre with NVIDIA ...

New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing ...

Applications

New simulation sheds light on spiraling supermassive black holes ...

DNA unzipped, turned around, and rezipped ...

Dark Energy Survey releases first year value-added data products ...

A quantum leap toward expanding the search for dark matter ...

HP-CONCORD paves the way for scalable machine learning in HPC ...

In disaster's wake, novel computing techniques support emergency responders ...

Transition metal dichalcogenides could increase computer speed, memory by a million times ...

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI ...

Rochester Institute of Technology leads multi-university collaboration to simulate neutron star mergers ...

The Cloud

Oracle rolls out Autonomous NoSQL Database service ...

Quanta Cloud Technology showcases AI portfolio options at GTC Europe ...

ZeroStack delivers GPU-as-a-Service via NVIDIA hardware ...