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Primeur weekly 2018-10-08

Special

Where did the first 500 million euro invested by the European Horizon 2020 programme go? ...

Focus

World's first ARM-based supercomputer Isambard is ready for science ...

Exascale supercomputing

New European project ESCAPE-2 on exascale computing for numerical weather prediction gets under way ...

Berkeley Lab, Oak Ridge, and NVIDIA team breaks exaop barrier with deep learning application ...

Coming soon to exascale computing: Software for chemistry of catalysis ...

Quantum computing

ORNL researchers advance quantum computing, science through six DOE awards ...

Berkeley Lab to build an advanced quantum computing testbed ...

Berkeley Lab to push quantum information frontiers with new programmes in computing, physics, materials, and chemistry ...

Berkeley Quantum to accelerate innovation in quantum information science ...

Quantum software company Zapata Computing adds Clark Golestani to Board ...

Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber ...

Focus on Europe

Atos and the University of Reims launch ROMEO, one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, under the sponsorship of Cedric Villani ...

Special Edition of Open e-IRG Workshop under the Austrian EU Presidency will focus on relationship between Open Science, FAIR data and EOSC ...

Goethe University to develop green supercomputer for science ...

Calling on HPC experts and enthusiasts to propose tutorials and workshops for ISC 2019 ...

ISC 2019 calls for research paper submission by December 12, 2018 ...

Middleware

USC ISI to pilot Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence for National Science Foundation ...

Hardware

Tintri co-founder Mark Gritter joins Tintri by DDN as CTO to lead analytics and server virtualization vision ...

DDN simplifies the AI data centre with NVIDIA ...

New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing ...

Applications

New simulation sheds light on spiraling supermassive black holes ...

DNA unzipped, turned around, and rezipped ...

Dark Energy Survey releases first year value-added data products ...

A quantum leap toward expanding the search for dark matter ...

HP-CONCORD paves the way for scalable machine learning in HPC ...

In disaster's wake, novel computing techniques support emergency responders ...

Transition metal dichalcogenides could increase computer speed, memory by a million times ...

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI ...

Rochester Institute of Technology leads multi-university collaboration to simulate neutron star mergers ...

The Cloud

Oracle rolls out Autonomous NoSQL Database service ...

Quanta Cloud Technology showcases AI portfolio options at GTC Europe ...

ZeroStack delivers GPU-as-a-Service via NVIDIA hardware ...

New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing

This is Louis Piper, associate professor of physics and director of materials science and engineering at Binghamton University. Credit: Binghamton University, State University at New York.3 Oct 2018 Binghamton - Computers in the future could be more energy-efficient, thanks to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

Devices like drones depend on a constant WiFi signal - if the WiFi stops, the drone crashes. Louis Piper, associate professor of physics and director of materials science and engineering at Binghamton University, wants to make more energy-efficient computers, so things like drones could be responsive to their environment without worrying about a WiFi signal linking it to a larger computer machine.

"You could put 5G and 6G everywhere and assume that you have a reliable internet connection all the time, or you could address the problem with hardware processing, which is what we're doing", stated Louis Piper. "The idea is we want to have these chips that can do all the functioning in the chip, rather than messages back and forth with some sort of large server. It should be more efficient that way."

Scientists have developed "neuristor" circuits that behave similarly to biological neurons in the human brain, which can perform complex computations using an incredibly small amount of power. More recently, a vital component of this neuristor circuit was created using niobium dioxide (NbO2), which replicates the switching behaviour observed in ion channels within biological neurons. These NbO2devices are created by applying a large voltage across a non-conductive niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) film, causing the formation of conductive NbO2filaments which are responsible for the important switching behavior. Unfortunately, this high-voltage and time-consuming post-fabrication process makes it near impossible to create the dense circuits needed for complex computer processors. In addition, these NbO2devices require an additional companion capacitor to function properly within the neuristor circuit, making them more complex and unwieldy to implement.

"One of the main problems we have with trying to make these systems is the fact that you have to do this electroforming step", stated Louis Piper. "Like with Frankenstein's monster, you basically pulse a large amount of electricity through the material, and suddenly it becomes an active element. That's not very reliable for an engineering step with fabrication. That's not how we do things with silicon transistors. We like to fab them all and then they work right away." In this study, Georgia Tech researchers created Nb2O5x-based devices that reproduce similar behaviour of the combined NbO2/capacitor pair without the need for the added bolt of energy. Binghamton researchers verified the mechanism that was being proposed. This finding, said Louis Piper, could lead to more inexpensive, energy-efficient, and high-density neuristor circuits than previously possible, accelerating the way to more energy efficient and adaptable computing.

"We want to have materials that inherently have some sort of switching operation themselves, which we can then utilize at the same dimensions where we're meeting the end with silicon. The ability to scale and the ability to remove some sort of alchemy with regards to this electroforming process really makes it more in line with how we do semiconducting processing nowadays; this makes it more reliable. You can build a neuristor out of this, and because you don't need the electroforming, it's more reliable and what you can build an industry on."

Now that they've verified the models, Louis Piper and his team want to find out what's going on in the actual device as it's operating.

"The real effort at Binghamton has been toward trying to model, from an atomic point of view, the nature of these states, how they arise from physics and chemistry, and also instead of just looking at the inert materials and then correlating it with the device performance, can we actually see how these states evolve as we operate the device?" said Louis Piper.

This researcher was supported by a grant from the Department of Defense.

The paper, " Scalable Memdiodes Exhibiting Rectification and Hysteresis for Neuromorphic Computing ", was published inScientific Reports.

Source: Binghamton University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-10-08

Special

Where did the first 500 million euro invested by the European Horizon 2020 programme go? ...

Focus

World's first ARM-based supercomputer Isambard is ready for science ...

Exascale supercomputing

New European project ESCAPE-2 on exascale computing for numerical weather prediction gets under way ...

Berkeley Lab, Oak Ridge, and NVIDIA team breaks exaop barrier with deep learning application ...

Coming soon to exascale computing: Software for chemistry of catalysis ...

Quantum computing

ORNL researchers advance quantum computing, science through six DOE awards ...

Berkeley Lab to build an advanced quantum computing testbed ...

Berkeley Lab to push quantum information frontiers with new programmes in computing, physics, materials, and chemistry ...

Berkeley Quantum to accelerate innovation in quantum information science ...

Quantum software company Zapata Computing adds Clark Golestani to Board ...

Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber ...

Focus on Europe

Atos and the University of Reims launch ROMEO, one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, under the sponsorship of Cedric Villani ...

Special Edition of Open e-IRG Workshop under the Austrian EU Presidency will focus on relationship between Open Science, FAIR data and EOSC ...

Goethe University to develop green supercomputer for science ...

Calling on HPC experts and enthusiasts to propose tutorials and workshops for ISC 2019 ...

ISC 2019 calls for research paper submission by December 12, 2018 ...

Middleware

USC ISI to pilot Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence for National Science Foundation ...

Hardware

Tintri co-founder Mark Gritter joins Tintri by DDN as CTO to lead analytics and server virtualization vision ...

DDN simplifies the AI data centre with NVIDIA ...

New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing ...

Applications

New simulation sheds light on spiraling supermassive black holes ...

DNA unzipped, turned around, and rezipped ...

Dark Energy Survey releases first year value-added data products ...

A quantum leap toward expanding the search for dark matter ...

HP-CONCORD paves the way for scalable machine learning in HPC ...

In disaster's wake, novel computing techniques support emergency responders ...

Transition metal dichalcogenides could increase computer speed, memory by a million times ...

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI ...

Rochester Institute of Technology leads multi-university collaboration to simulate neutron star mergers ...

The Cloud

Oracle rolls out Autonomous NoSQL Database service ...

Quanta Cloud Technology showcases AI portfolio options at GTC Europe ...

ZeroStack delivers GPU-as-a-Service via NVIDIA hardware ...