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Primeur weekly 2016-10-24

Focus

EUDAT Project Director Damien Lecarpentier to expand on added value of EUDAT for data storage, the success of the first DI4R Conference and on the importance of Key Performance Indicators for e-infrastructures ...

Quantum computing

Exploring defects in nanoscale devices for possible quantum computing applications ...

Quantum computers: 10-fold boost in stability achieved ...

New 3D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality ...

Focus on Europe

ISC 2017 seeks contributors for Conference programme ...

Middleware

Allinea brings new software performance briefings to SC16 ...

Hardware

Innovative technique for shaping light could solve bandwidth crunch ...

R&D collaboration in integrated electronic systems receives top award ...

UK Met Office installs new HPC system to significantly improve productivity of weather and climate data analysis ...

Fast data sharing with South Korea via Netherlight ...

NSF funds new projects to advance energy-efficient computing ...

Applications

Can we find more benign nanomaterials? ...

Scientists find technique to improve carbon superlattices for quantum electronic devices ...

A new class of materials could realize quantum computers ...

Rhön-Klinikum Hospitals to study how IBM Watson can support doctors in the diagnosis of rare diseases ...

Predicting jellyfish invasions at coastal power stations ...

IBM and Quest Diagnostics launch Watson-powered genomic sequencing service to help physicians bring precision cancer treatments to patients nationwide ...

A new spin on superconductivity ...

Insilico Medicine to present on recent advances in AI at BioData World in Cambridge ...

Unraveling the science behind biomass breakdown ...

T-rays will speed up computer memory by a factor of 1,000 ...

Promise of gene therapy for glaucoma shines bright in award-winning image ...

The Cloud

Amazon Web Services Cloud now available to customers from data centres in Ohio ...

IBM Cloud expands Bluemix ecosystem in China to fuel blockchain and IoT innovation ...

Atos teams with VMware to launch Digital Private Cloud offering ...

DNAstack launches genomics platform to accelerate disease research and precision medicine ...

T-rays will speed up computer memory by a factor of 1,000


The figure shows the spin and lattice structure of thulium orthoferrite (TmFeO3) on the left and the T-ray-induced transitions between the energy levels of thulium ions (Tm3), which trigger coherent spin dynamics (memory switching), on the right. Credit: MIPT Press Office.
13 Oct 2016 Moscow - Together with their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands, scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have found a way to significantly improve computer performance. In their paper published inNature Photonics, they propose the use of the so-called T-waves, or terahertz radiation as a means of resetting computer memory cells. This process is several thousand times faster than magnetic-field-induced switching.

"We have demonstrated an entirely new way of controlling magnetization, which relies on short electromagnetic pulses at terahertz frequencies. This is an important step towards terahertz electronics. As far as we know, our study is the first to make use of this mechanism to trigger the oscillations of magnetic subsystems", stated Anatoly Zvezdin of Prokhorov General Physics Institute and MIPT, a co-author of the paper and a USSR State Prize-winning scientist heading MIPT's Laboratory of Physics of Magnetic Heterostructures and Spintronics for Energy-Saving Information Technologies.

The rapidly increasing amounts of digital data that have to be manipulated, along with the growing complexity of the computation tasks at hand, compel hardware designers to achieve ever higher computational speeds. Many experts believe that classical computation is currently approaching a limit, beyond which no further increase in data processing speed will be practicable. This is motivating scientists all over the world to investigate possibilities of entirely different computer technologies. One of the weak spots in modern computers holding back their evolution is memory: it takes time to complete every set/reset operation for a magnetic memory cell, and reducing the duration of this cycle is a very challenging task.

A group of scientists including Sebastian Baierl of the University of Regensburg, Anatoly Zvezdin, and Alexey Kimel of Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands and Moscow Technological University (MIREA) proposed that electromagnetic pulses at terahertz frequencies - with wavelengths of about 0.1 millimeters, i.e., between those of microwaves and infrared light - could be used in memory switching instead of external magnetic fields. A more familiar device that makes use of terahertz radiation is the airport body scanner. T-rays can expose weapons or explosives concealed under a person's clothing, without causing any harm to live tissues.

To find out whether T-rays could be used for convenient memory states switching - storing "magnetic bits" of information, the researchers performed an experiment with thulium orthoferrite (TmFeO3). As a weak ferromagnet, it generates a magnetic field by virtue of the ordered alignment of the magnetic moments, or spins of atoms in the microcrystals (magnetic domains). In order to induce a reorientation of spins, an external magnetic field is necessary.

However, the experiment has shown that it is also possible to control magnetization directly by using terahertz radiation, which excites electronic transitions in thulium ions and alters the magnetic properties of both iron and thulium ions. Furthermore, the effect of T-rays proved to be almost ten times greater than that of the external magnetic field. In other words, the researchers have devised a fast and highly efficient remagnetization technique - a solid foundation for developing ultrafast memory.

The scientists expect their "T-ray switching" to work with other materials as well. Thulium orthoferrite, which was used in the experiment, happens to be convenient for the purposes of demonstration, but the proposed magnetization control scheme itself is applicable to many other magnetic materials.

"There was a Soviet research group that used orthoferrites in their studies, so this was always kind of a priority field for us. This research can be seen as a follow-up on their studies", stated Anatoly Zvezdin.

Source: Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology - MIPT

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-10-24

Focus

EUDAT Project Director Damien Lecarpentier to expand on added value of EUDAT for data storage, the success of the first DI4R Conference and on the importance of Key Performance Indicators for e-infrastructures ...

Quantum computing

Exploring defects in nanoscale devices for possible quantum computing applications ...

Quantum computers: 10-fold boost in stability achieved ...

New 3D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality ...

Focus on Europe

ISC 2017 seeks contributors for Conference programme ...

Middleware

Allinea brings new software performance briefings to SC16 ...

Hardware

Innovative technique for shaping light could solve bandwidth crunch ...

R&D collaboration in integrated electronic systems receives top award ...

UK Met Office installs new HPC system to significantly improve productivity of weather and climate data analysis ...

Fast data sharing with South Korea via Netherlight ...

NSF funds new projects to advance energy-efficient computing ...

Applications

Can we find more benign nanomaterials? ...

Scientists find technique to improve carbon superlattices for quantum electronic devices ...

A new class of materials could realize quantum computers ...

Rhön-Klinikum Hospitals to study how IBM Watson can support doctors in the diagnosis of rare diseases ...

Predicting jellyfish invasions at coastal power stations ...

IBM and Quest Diagnostics launch Watson-powered genomic sequencing service to help physicians bring precision cancer treatments to patients nationwide ...

A new spin on superconductivity ...

Insilico Medicine to present on recent advances in AI at BioData World in Cambridge ...

Unraveling the science behind biomass breakdown ...

T-rays will speed up computer memory by a factor of 1,000 ...

Promise of gene therapy for glaucoma shines bright in award-winning image ...

The Cloud

Amazon Web Services Cloud now available to customers from data centres in Ohio ...

IBM Cloud expands Bluemix ecosystem in China to fuel blockchain and IoT innovation ...

Atos teams with VMware to launch Digital Private Cloud offering ...

DNAstack launches genomics platform to accelerate disease research and precision medicine ...