Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-10-10

Exascale supercomputing

The incredible shrinking particle accelerator ...

Brookhaven Lab to play major role in 2 DOE exascale computing application projects ...

Quantum computing

More stable qubits in perfectly normal silicon ...

Focus on Europe

RSC supercomputers go West ...

Hardware

Allinea tools play vital role in advancing computational research at the VSC, Austria's largest HPC facility ...

Smallest transistor ever ...

Turning to the brain to reboot computing ...

Complex materials can self-organize into circuits, may form basis for multifunction chips ...

Wireless data centre on a chip aims to cut energy use ...

Adapteva announces 28nm 64-core Epiphany-IV microprocessor chip ...

SGI introduces unique scale-out solution for SAP HANA that protects investments when moving to real-time business ...

Applications

Clemson University scientists receive $1.8 million grant to combat Type 2 diabetes ...

Climate change intensifies night-time storms over Lake Victoria ...

Computer simulations explore how Alzheimer's disease starts ...

Rice University lab explores cement's crystalline nature to boost concrete performance ...

Rice University researchers say 2D boron may be best for flexible electronics ...

Large animals, such as the imperious African elephant, most vulnerable to impact of human expansion ...

Computer simulation finds dangerous molecule activity for ageing ...

Tornadogenesis ...

As hurricane heads up coast, a RENCI supercomputer swings into action ...

New drug candidate may reduce deficits in Parkinson's disease ...

XSEDE allocations awarded to 155 research teams across U.S. ...

OSC part of NSF-funded consortium for advancing research computing practices ...

NCSA awarded NSF grant to expand computational science education in food, energy, and water ...

Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation ...

The Cloud

Nimbix collaborates with IBM and NVIDIA to launch powerful GPU Cloud offering ...

Large animals, such as the imperious African elephant, most vulnerable to impact of human expansion

4 Oct 2016 Exeter - Some of the most iconic giants of the animal kingdom, such as the imperious African elephant, are most vulnerable to the detrimental impact of human expansion, new research has shown.

A team of scientists, led by Lewis Bartlett from the University of Exeter, have studied the alarming extent changes to the natural environment - through activities such as farming, expansion and climate change - have on the local ecosystem.

In particular, the team studied the influence that habitat loss and fragmentation - where once great swathes of land are broken into smaller, isolated patches - can have on native wildlife.

They discovered that larger animals, such as the the elephant, are more vulnerable to changes to their natural surroundings - and so be most exposed to the threat of extinction.

The research team believe the pivotal new study, which is published in the highly respected journalProceedings of the Royal Society B, could help conservationists and scientists more accurately predict the effect that human activity will have on the natural world.

Lewis Bartlett, lead author of the paper from the Centre of Ecology and Conservation at the University of Exeter's Penryn Campus, Cornwall, stated: "At a time when some of our biggest and most iconic animals are facing multiple routes to extinction, every new piece of information helps. By using computer simulations - with the help of Microsoft Research's supercomputer cluster - we've shown that these biggest animals are the ones most threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation."

The team of scientists use the world-leading 'Madingley Model' - which can simulate all life on Earth on land and oceans - to conduct their study, focusing on a large area of the broad Kenyan plains.

The team divided the area into a series of 100 small grid sections, and studied how the area and its wildlife reacted to localised changes to the vegetation levels - for example through effects like wildfire, human expansion or over grazing.

They discovered that habitat fragmentation , caused when small 'patches' of vegetation are removed rather than one, larger section, has an alarmingly detrimental effect on the ability of larger animals to survive.

Furthermore, the effects of fragmentation are magnified when experienced in conjunction with a greater intensity of land change use through human activity - which in turn leads to more changes to the ecosystem.

The research team suggest that studying ecosystems across a wide expansive area, rather than individually, enables scientists to better predict the expected outcomes of such vegetation changes.

Furthermore, they believe that analyses such as this can help scientists predict what will happen if humans pursue particular activities in localised areas - and also help identify the threshold at which ecosystems would not be able to recover.

Lewis Bartlett added: "We hope that being able to forecast how to meet demands for more land and space, whilst minimising the impact to ecosystems, will help achieve the best outcomes for nature and people."

Synergistic impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation on model ecosystems, is published online in theProceedings of the Royal Society B.

Source: University of Exeter

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-10-10

Exascale supercomputing

The incredible shrinking particle accelerator ...

Brookhaven Lab to play major role in 2 DOE exascale computing application projects ...

Quantum computing

More stable qubits in perfectly normal silicon ...

Focus on Europe

RSC supercomputers go West ...

Hardware

Allinea tools play vital role in advancing computational research at the VSC, Austria's largest HPC facility ...

Smallest transistor ever ...

Turning to the brain to reboot computing ...

Complex materials can self-organize into circuits, may form basis for multifunction chips ...

Wireless data centre on a chip aims to cut energy use ...

Adapteva announces 28nm 64-core Epiphany-IV microprocessor chip ...

SGI introduces unique scale-out solution for SAP HANA that protects investments when moving to real-time business ...

Applications

Clemson University scientists receive $1.8 million grant to combat Type 2 diabetes ...

Climate change intensifies night-time storms over Lake Victoria ...

Computer simulations explore how Alzheimer's disease starts ...

Rice University lab explores cement's crystalline nature to boost concrete performance ...

Rice University researchers say 2D boron may be best for flexible electronics ...

Large animals, such as the imperious African elephant, most vulnerable to impact of human expansion ...

Computer simulation finds dangerous molecule activity for ageing ...

Tornadogenesis ...

As hurricane heads up coast, a RENCI supercomputer swings into action ...

New drug candidate may reduce deficits in Parkinson's disease ...

XSEDE allocations awarded to 155 research teams across U.S. ...

OSC part of NSF-funded consortium for advancing research computing practices ...

NCSA awarded NSF grant to expand computational science education in food, energy, and water ...

Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation ...

The Cloud

Nimbix collaborates with IBM and NVIDIA to launch powerful GPU Cloud offering ...