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Primeur weekly 2016-10-10

Exascale supercomputing

The incredible shrinking particle accelerator ...

Brookhaven Lab to play major role in 2 DOE exascale computing application projects ...

Quantum computing

More stable qubits in perfectly normal silicon ...

Focus on Europe

RSC supercomputers go West ...

Hardware

Allinea tools play vital role in advancing computational research at the VSC, Austria's largest HPC facility ...

Smallest transistor ever ...

Turning to the brain to reboot computing ...

Complex materials can self-organize into circuits, may form basis for multifunction chips ...

Wireless data centre on a chip aims to cut energy use ...

Adapteva announces 28nm 64-core Epiphany-IV microprocessor chip ...

SGI introduces unique scale-out solution for SAP HANA that protects investments when moving to real-time business ...

Applications

Clemson University scientists receive $1.8 million grant to combat Type 2 diabetes ...

Climate change intensifies night-time storms over Lake Victoria ...

Computer simulations explore how Alzheimer's disease starts ...

Rice University lab explores cement's crystalline nature to boost concrete performance ...

Rice University researchers say 2D boron may be best for flexible electronics ...

Large animals, such as the imperious African elephant, most vulnerable to impact of human expansion ...

Computer simulation finds dangerous molecule activity for ageing ...

Tornadogenesis ...

As hurricane heads up coast, a RENCI supercomputer swings into action ...

New drug candidate may reduce deficits in Parkinson's disease ...

XSEDE allocations awarded to 155 research teams across U.S. ...

OSC part of NSF-funded consortium for advancing research computing practices ...

NCSA awarded NSF grant to expand computational science education in food, energy, and water ...

Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation ...

The Cloud

Nimbix collaborates with IBM and NVIDIA to launch powerful GPU Cloud offering ...

More stable qubits in perfectly normal silicon

4 Oct 2016 Delft - The power of future quantum computers stems from the use of qubits, or quantum bits. It is not yet clear on which technology these qubits in quantum computers will be based, but qubits based on electron spins are looking more and more promising. It was thought that these could only be produced in the expensive semiconductor material gallium arsenide, but researchers have now discovered that the more common material silicon is even better

Because qubits can be both 1 and 0 simultaneously, a quantum computer will be able to tackle computing problems that are out of reach of the current supercomputers. The main issue for researchers is that this superposition is very fragile. "Two numbers are very important for qubits", explained research leader Lieven Vandersypen. "The length of time the superposition can be maintained before it spontaneously reverts to 1 or 0 is critical for an effectively functioning quantum computer. In gallium arsenide, this is about 10 nanoseconds, but in silicon we have achieved a factor of 100 longer. Using smart technologies we were able to stretch this to 0.4 milliseconds. Although a coherence time of 0.4 milliseconds may not sound very long, for a computer it is nearly an eternity. Moreover, the gate fidelity in silicon is 10-100 times better. The gate fidelity is the measure of whether an operation you perform on a qubit will actually work."

The researchers used 'standard' silicon, an extremely cheap material of which there is an almost infinite supply: it is the main ingredient of sand. Earlier research by the University of New South Wales in Australia demonstrated that isotopically purified silicon-28 can produce even better results. Silicon naturally contains three isotopes, including the common form Si-28, and the less common form with atomic number 29. The latter form has been proven to degrade the coherence and gate fidelity considerably. Researchers believe that replacing gallium arsenide with silicon will be extremely important for the design of the quantum computer. The required technology for fabricating nanostructures in silicon has already reached an advanced stage in chip technology, and now, as the researchers hoped, silicon also proves to be a better qubit material.

Researchers of TU Delft are collaborating intensively with other researchers, among others from Intel Corporation, who joined a partnership with QuTech last year. The greatest challenge for quantum technologists now is to scale up the various qubits for use in circuits of multiple interplaying qubits. "At least hundreds of qubits - and preferably many more - will need to work together to make a working quantum computer", stated Lieven Vandersypen.

The research published inPNASwas supported by the Dutch Organization for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM).
Source: Delft University of Technology

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-10-10

Exascale supercomputing

The incredible shrinking particle accelerator ...

Brookhaven Lab to play major role in 2 DOE exascale computing application projects ...

Quantum computing

More stable qubits in perfectly normal silicon ...

Focus on Europe

RSC supercomputers go West ...

Hardware

Allinea tools play vital role in advancing computational research at the VSC, Austria's largest HPC facility ...

Smallest transistor ever ...

Turning to the brain to reboot computing ...

Complex materials can self-organize into circuits, may form basis for multifunction chips ...

Wireless data centre on a chip aims to cut energy use ...

Adapteva announces 28nm 64-core Epiphany-IV microprocessor chip ...

SGI introduces unique scale-out solution for SAP HANA that protects investments when moving to real-time business ...

Applications

Clemson University scientists receive $1.8 million grant to combat Type 2 diabetes ...

Climate change intensifies night-time storms over Lake Victoria ...

Computer simulations explore how Alzheimer's disease starts ...

Rice University lab explores cement's crystalline nature to boost concrete performance ...

Rice University researchers say 2D boron may be best for flexible electronics ...

Large animals, such as the imperious African elephant, most vulnerable to impact of human expansion ...

Computer simulation finds dangerous molecule activity for ageing ...

Tornadogenesis ...

As hurricane heads up coast, a RENCI supercomputer swings into action ...

New drug candidate may reduce deficits in Parkinson's disease ...

XSEDE allocations awarded to 155 research teams across U.S. ...

OSC part of NSF-funded consortium for advancing research computing practices ...

NCSA awarded NSF grant to expand computational science education in food, energy, and water ...

Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation ...

The Cloud

Nimbix collaborates with IBM and NVIDIA to launch powerful GPU Cloud offering ...