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Primeur weekly 2016-10-03

Exascale supercomputing

NCI continues to lead Australian HPC capabilities with adoption of cutting-edge Intel processors ...

Quantum computing

D-Wave Systems previews 2000-qubit quantum system ...

First quantum photonic circuit with an electrically driven light source ...

Focus on Europe

Earlham Institute embraces Green-HPC for Collaborative Genome Analysis at Icelandic Data Centre Verne Global ...

Fortissimo has launched 2nd Open Call for proposals ...

STFC Computers get to the heart of the matter ...

Rob van Nieuwpoort, professor by special appointment of Efficient Computing for eScience ...

VTT Centre for Nuclear Safety inaugurated ...

Middleware

Allinea launches CUDA 8 support to enable code development for newest NVIDIA GPU technology ...

China endeavours to build a Big Data 'Smart Ocean' ...

Percepto and Orange Silicon Valley showcase advanced autonomous drone platform with 4G/LTE connectivity ...

Hardware

TSMC recognizes Synopsys with three partner awards for Interface IP and joint development of 7-nm ...

NetSpeed releases Gemini 3.0 cache-coherent NoC IP to supercharge heterogeneous SoC designs ...

Quantum provides Petascale data storage and management for major European research institutions ...

The University of Tokyo and the Joint Center for Advanced High Performance Computing (JCAHPC) to deploy DDN's file cache system IME14K ...

Introducing Xavier, the NVIDIA AI supercomputer for the future of autonomous transporation ...

Penguin Computing to deliver scalable enterprise storage for HPC, Big Data and VM ...

Applications

Loyola Marymount University researchers predict climate change will bring more droughts, more floods and water shortage ...

UMass Amherst engineers lead research team on creating new devices that emulate human biological synapses ...

Computer engineers boost app speeds by more than 9 percent ...

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics awarded access to high-performance supercomputer ...

Hartree Centre presents at International Industrial Supercomputing Workshop ...

Mapping the electric underground ...

IBM Foundation collaborates with AFT and education leaders to use Watson to help teachers ...

Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation ...

How to merge two black holes in a simple way ...

Nijmegen provides solution for secure processing of patient data ...

The Cloud

Penguin Computing announces availability of unique multi-user remote desktop collaboration for Scyld Cloud workstation ...

Microsoft unveils new offerings to empower IT and drive digital transformation ...

Eurofiber’s Secure Cloud Connect service provides safe access to the Cloud ...

New NetApp software and Flash systems simplify data management, boost performance in the hybrid Cloud ...

Penguin Computing announces OpenPOWER server platform and go-to-market partner Mark III systems ...

Clarient Global adopts IBM Cloud and VMware for enhanced private Cloud capabilities ...

STFC Computers get to the heart of the matter


Credit: Dreamstime/Dmyto Tolokonov
28 Sep 2016 Daresbury - Scientists are using powerful supercomputers to visualise how blood flows through implanted blood pumps, which prolong the lives of heart patients waiting for a donor. The work will help to reduce the number of prototypes needed for clinical testing - so saving on time, materials and costs - and potentially lead to the earlier availability of devices for patient use.

The goal of the research team, from the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC) Scientific Computing Department, is to assess if using Computational Fluid Dynamics in conjunction with High Performance Computing (HPC) can increase confidence in the use of computer models to design these complex medical devices.

Heart failures and diseases claim more than 17 million lives across the world each year - more than all forms of cancer combined. The number is expected to grow to 23.6 million by 2030. In the UK alone, 155,000 people died from heart diseases in 2014. It is estimated that seven million people in the UK are living with heart and circulatory diseases and health care costs could be as much as GBP 11 billion.

The STFC Scientific Computing Department team answered a call from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to assess whether computer models can accurately simulate the performance of blood pumps - known as Ventricular Assist Devices, or VADs.

Working with colleagues from FH Aachen University of Applied Sciences and FZ Jülich Research Centre in Germany, and EDF R&D, STFC's Professor David Emerson and Dr. Charles Moulinec developed simulations of how a centrifugal pump would behave with blood flowing through it at different rates, and using various rotation angles.

Professor Emerson explained: "The pump has a central rotor and blades which turn, helping the blood to flow. It would take several revolutions of the blades before it gets to a quasi-steady state where the blood flows smoothly, so we looked at results obtained at between five and 15 revolutions."

The researchers used four million hours of computing time on the Blue Joule HPC facility at STFC's Hartree Centre and the JuQueen HPC facility at FZ Jülich to perform the billions of calculations needed to produce faster, more accurate blood-flow simulations. One simulation involved 76 million elements, or computational cells, just to describe a pump's dimensions.

Through these calculations they were able to predict where any damage to the blood might occur through turbulence in the flow, which could lead to blood clotting (thrombosis) or the breakdown of red blood cells (haemolysis). These are the two major life-threatening factors for patients depending on VADs.

"We also explored different velocities", added Professor Emerson. "This showed that tip vortices exist - giving the same sort of effect as water flowing quickly over rocks - when the blades turn at higher speeds. In a real device these vortices would make the pump shudder."

The US FDA will collect the data from simulations carried out by all participating research teams and analyse the results in a 'blind' test - so the identity of the team will remain hidden and the data will be assessed on its own merit. The results will be compared with laboratory experiments carried out in parallel on the real devices and the conclusions are expected to be published later this year.

"Our results suggest that the design of these VADs need to be more blood-sensitive to reduce the risk of haemolysis and thrombosis", stated Professor Emerson. "Our work, and the work of other groups, can be used by the FDA to improve future devices, making them safer and available earlier for heart patients in the future."

The team has also secured funding to develop the project further, which will involve assessing an existing mathematical model called 'Large Eddy Simulation' as a turbulence model for blood flow.

The research is funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council.
Source: Science and Technology Facilities Council - STFC

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-10-03

Exascale supercomputing

NCI continues to lead Australian HPC capabilities with adoption of cutting-edge Intel processors ...

Quantum computing

D-Wave Systems previews 2000-qubit quantum system ...

First quantum photonic circuit with an electrically driven light source ...

Focus on Europe

Earlham Institute embraces Green-HPC for Collaborative Genome Analysis at Icelandic Data Centre Verne Global ...

Fortissimo has launched 2nd Open Call for proposals ...

STFC Computers get to the heart of the matter ...

Rob van Nieuwpoort, professor by special appointment of Efficient Computing for eScience ...

VTT Centre for Nuclear Safety inaugurated ...

Middleware

Allinea launches CUDA 8 support to enable code development for newest NVIDIA GPU technology ...

China endeavours to build a Big Data 'Smart Ocean' ...

Percepto and Orange Silicon Valley showcase advanced autonomous drone platform with 4G/LTE connectivity ...

Hardware

TSMC recognizes Synopsys with three partner awards for Interface IP and joint development of 7-nm ...

NetSpeed releases Gemini 3.0 cache-coherent NoC IP to supercharge heterogeneous SoC designs ...

Quantum provides Petascale data storage and management for major European research institutions ...

The University of Tokyo and the Joint Center for Advanced High Performance Computing (JCAHPC) to deploy DDN's file cache system IME14K ...

Introducing Xavier, the NVIDIA AI supercomputer for the future of autonomous transporation ...

Penguin Computing to deliver scalable enterprise storage for HPC, Big Data and VM ...

Applications

Loyola Marymount University researchers predict climate change will bring more droughts, more floods and water shortage ...

UMass Amherst engineers lead research team on creating new devices that emulate human biological synapses ...

Computer engineers boost app speeds by more than 9 percent ...

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics awarded access to high-performance supercomputer ...

Hartree Centre presents at International Industrial Supercomputing Workshop ...

Mapping the electric underground ...

IBM Foundation collaborates with AFT and education leaders to use Watson to help teachers ...

Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation ...

How to merge two black holes in a simple way ...

Nijmegen provides solution for secure processing of patient data ...

The Cloud

Penguin Computing announces availability of unique multi-user remote desktop collaboration for Scyld Cloud workstation ...

Microsoft unveils new offerings to empower IT and drive digital transformation ...

Eurofiber’s Secure Cloud Connect service provides safe access to the Cloud ...

New NetApp software and Flash systems simplify data management, boost performance in the hybrid Cloud ...

Penguin Computing announces OpenPOWER server platform and go-to-market partner Mark III systems ...

Clarient Global adopts IBM Cloud and VMware for enhanced private Cloud capabilities ...