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Primeur weekly 2013-10-07

Focus

2013: Another year on the road to Exascale - An Interview with Thomas Sterling and Satoshi Matsuoka - Part II ...

The Cloud

First official release of COMPSs programming environment  ...

Bull acquires FastConnect and speeds up its development in Cloud and Big Data ...

HP Enterprise Cloud Services selected for USPS Federal Cloud Credential Exchange ...

NIH launches first phase of Microbiome Cloud Project ...

EuroFlash

iMENTORS: Find ICT4D partners on a map ...

The DataScale consortium tackles the challenges of Big Data in High Performance Computing ...

Bull launches bullion fast data analytics to process in real-time the massive amounts of data generated by the digital world ...

Quantum computers: Trust is good, proof is better ...

USFlash

National Science Foundation awards $12 million to SDSC to deploy 'Comet' supercomputer ...

Cray to install a liquid-cooled Cray CS300 cluster supercomputer at Mississippi State University ...

Cray adds NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors to its line of Cray XC30 supercomputers ...

Rensselaer at Petascale: AMOS among the world’s fastest and most powerful supercomputers ...

Indiana University secures $6 million contract to operate NOAA science network ...

TACC receives NSF grant to deploy innovative new data resource ...

TACC launches mobile app ...

Independent survey finds a majority of IT organisations rarely delete data and grapple with challenge of managing long-term data storage ...

DataDirect Networks and Sierra Detention Systems collaborate to offer world class physical security solution for scalable mission critical video surveillance applications ...

IBM teams with leading universities to advance research in cognitive systems ...

Oracle introduces new x86 servers ...

UC San Diego and University of Maryland researchers to build 'WIFIRE' cyberinfrastructure ...

YarcData announces new Urika software release for Big Data analytics ...

$16 million for coal energy research ...

Quantum computers: Trust is good, proof is better


30 Sep 2013 Vienna - A quantum computer can solve tasks not tractable with conventional supercomputers. The question of how one can, nevertheless, verify the reliability of a quantum computer was recently answered in an experiment at the University of Vienna. The conclusions are published in the reputed scientific journalNature Physics.

The harnessing of quantum phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement, holds great promise for constructing future supercomputers. One huge advantage of such quantum computers is that they are capable of performing a variety of tasks much quicker than their conventional counterparts. The use of quantum computers for these purposes raises a significant challenge: how can one verify the results provided by such a computer?

It is only recently that theoretical developments have provided methods to test a quantum computer without having an additional quantum computer at hand. The international research team around Philip Walther at the University of Vienna have now demonstrated a new protocol, where the quantum computational results can be verified without using additional quantum computer resources.

In order to test the quantum computer the scientists inserted "traps" into the tasks. The traps are short intermediate calculations to which the user knows the result in advance. In the case that the quantum computer does not do its job properly the trap delivers a result that differs from the expected one. "In this way, the user can verify how reliable the quantum computer really is", explained Stefanie Barz, Vienna, first author of the study. The more traps the user builds into the tasks the more sure the user can be that the quantum computer indeed computes accurately.

"We designed the test in such a way that the quantum computer cannot distinguish the trap from its normal tasks", stated Elham Kashefi, Edinburgh and Joseph Fitzsimons, Singapore, theorists and co-authors of the paper. This is an important requirement to guarantee that the quantum computer is not able to tweak the test result. The researchers have also tested whether the quantum computer really resorts to quantum resources. Thereby, they can be sure that even a maliciously constructed quantum computer cannot fool them into accepting incorrect results.

For this first demonstration the researchers used an optical quantum computer, where single light particles, so-called photons, carried the information. The demonstrated protocol is generic, but optical quantum computers seem to be ideally suited for this task. The mobility of photons allows for easy interactions with the quantum computer. Philip Walther is optimistic about the prospects raised by this experiment which shows promising control mechanisms for future quantum computers. And, moreover, that it might lead to new tools for probing even complex quantum resources.

The publication titled "Experimental verification of quantum computations" is authored by Stefanie Barz, Joseph F. Fitzsimons, Elham Kashefi, Philip Walther. It appears inNature Physics, September 2013 - Doi: 10.1038/nphys2763.

The project is an international co-operation of researchers from the University of Vienna, the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore and the Singapore University of Technology and Design as well as the University of Edinburgh. The research has been partly funded by the European Commission (Q-ESSENCE and QUILMI), the Austrian Science Fund (SFB-FoQuS, START Y585-N20), the ERA-Net CHISTERA project (QUASAR), the Vienna Science and Technology Fund (ICT12-041), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA8655-11-1), and from the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2013-01) and the Ministry of Education as well as the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/E059600/1).

Source: University of Vienna

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2013-10-07

Focus

2013: Another year on the road to Exascale - An Interview with Thomas Sterling and Satoshi Matsuoka - Part II ...

The Cloud

First official release of COMPSs programming environment  ...

Bull acquires FastConnect and speeds up its development in Cloud and Big Data ...

HP Enterprise Cloud Services selected for USPS Federal Cloud Credential Exchange ...

NIH launches first phase of Microbiome Cloud Project ...

EuroFlash

iMENTORS: Find ICT4D partners on a map ...

The DataScale consortium tackles the challenges of Big Data in High Performance Computing ...

Bull launches bullion fast data analytics to process in real-time the massive amounts of data generated by the digital world ...

Quantum computers: Trust is good, proof is better ...

USFlash

National Science Foundation awards $12 million to SDSC to deploy 'Comet' supercomputer ...

Cray to install a liquid-cooled Cray CS300 cluster supercomputer at Mississippi State University ...

Cray adds NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors to its line of Cray XC30 supercomputers ...

Rensselaer at Petascale: AMOS among the world’s fastest and most powerful supercomputers ...

Indiana University secures $6 million contract to operate NOAA science network ...

TACC receives NSF grant to deploy innovative new data resource ...

TACC launches mobile app ...

Independent survey finds a majority of IT organisations rarely delete data and grapple with challenge of managing long-term data storage ...

DataDirect Networks and Sierra Detention Systems collaborate to offer world class physical security solution for scalable mission critical video surveillance applications ...

IBM teams with leading universities to advance research in cognitive systems ...

Oracle introduces new x86 servers ...

UC San Diego and University of Maryland researchers to build 'WIFIRE' cyberinfrastructure ...

YarcData announces new Urika software release for Big Data analytics ...

$16 million for coal energy research ...