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Primeur weekly 2011-10-31

Exascale supercomputing

PRACE partner Jülich joins XSEDE

The Cloud

Citrix NetScaler CloudConnectors extend network fabric to "last mile" Cloud services

Cloud computing: Gaps in the 'Cloud'

Final version of NIST Cloud computing definition published

Citrix CloudGateway delivers end user computing for the Cloud Era

Univa adds distributed automation to Xuropa Software Sales Cloud

EuroFlash

Impressions from the BiG Grid HPC Cloud Day in Amsterdam

OpenMP Architecture Review Board appoints New CEO

PRACE grants 721 million compute hours on Tier-0 systems to twenty-four European research projects and opens new call for Project Access

PRACE Tier-1 Workshop 2011 issues Call for Participation

USFlash

ARM discloses technical details of the next version of the ARM architecture

Grid Dynamics unveils DevOps Catalyst

SGI establishes new world record Apache Hadoop Benchmark

Cloudera and SGI partner to take high performance computing on Apache Hadoop to the next level

New IBM software helps analyze the world's data for health care transformation

Astronomers pin down galaxy collision rates by comparing Hubble images to supercomputer simulations

NASA Ames inks Lustre support deal with Whamcloud

Quantum computer components 'coalesce' to 'converse'

Idemitsu Petroleum Norge selects HP for business continuity

Targetbase adopts Oracle Exadata Database Machine for real-time data warehousing

Diamonds, silver and the quest for single photons

IBM launches Netezza appliance to help communications services providers analyze networks and gain consumer insight

Univa appoints veteran Head of Sales

SAS Alliances bring analytical innovation to businesses

New hybrid technology could bring 'quantum information systems'

Quantum computer components 'coalesce' to 'converse'

26 Oct 2011 Gaithersburg - If quantum computers are ever to be realized, they likely will be made of different types of parts that will need to share information with one another, just like the memory and logic circuits in today's computers do. However, prospects for achieving this kind of communication seemed distant - until now. A team of physicists working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has shown for the first time how these parts might communicate effectively.

The goal to develop quantum computers - a long-awaited type of computer that could solve otherwise intractable problems, such as breaking complex encryption codes - has inspired scientists the world over to invent new devices that could become the brains and memory of these machines. Many of these tiny devices use particles of light, or photons, to carry the bits of information that a quantum computer will use.

But while each of these pieces of hardware can do some jobs well, none are likely to accomplish all of the functions necessary to build a quantum computer. This implies that several different types of quantum devices will need to work together for the computer or network to function. The trouble is that these tiny devices frequently create photons of such different character that they cannot transfer the quantum bits of information between one another. Transmuting two vastly different photons into two similar ones would be a first step toward permitting quantum information components to communicate with one another over large distances, but until now this goal has remained elusive.

However, the team has demonstrated that it is possible to take photons from two disparate sources and render these particles partially indistinguishable. That photons can be made to "coalesce" and become indistinguishable without losing their essential quantum properties suggests in principle that they can connect various types of hardware devices into a single quantum information network. The team's achievement also demonstrates for the first time that a "hybrid" quantum computer might be assembled from different hardware types.

The team connected single photons from a "quantum dot", which could be useful in logic circuits, with a second single-photon source that uses "parametric down conversion", which might be used to connect different parts of the computer. These two sources typically produce photons that differ so dramatically in spectrum that they would be unusable in a quantum network. But with a deft choice of filters and other devices that alter the photons' spectral shapes and other properties, the team was able to make the photons virtually identical.

"We manipulate the photons to be as indistinguishable as possible in terms of spectra, location and polarization - the details you need to describe a photon. We attribute the remaining distinguishability to properties of the quantum dot", stated Glenn Solomon, of NIST's Quantum Measurement Division. "No conceivable measurement can tell indistinguishable photons apart. The results prove in principle that a hybrid quantum network is possible and can be scaled up for use in a quantum network."

The research team includes scientists from the NIST/University of Maryland Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) and Georgetown University. The NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI provided partial funding

S.V. Polyakov, A. Muller, E.B. Flagg, A. Ling, N. Borjemscaia, E. Van Keuren, A. Migdall and G.S. Solomon are the authors of the paper "Coalescence of single photons from dissimilar single-photon sources", which appears inPhysical Review Letters, 107, 157402 (2011), DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.157402.
Source: National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2011-10-31

Exascale supercomputing

PRACE partner Jülich joins XSEDE

The Cloud

Citrix NetScaler CloudConnectors extend network fabric to "last mile" Cloud services

Cloud computing: Gaps in the 'Cloud'

Final version of NIST Cloud computing definition published

Citrix CloudGateway delivers end user computing for the Cloud Era

Univa adds distributed automation to Xuropa Software Sales Cloud

EuroFlash

Impressions from the BiG Grid HPC Cloud Day in Amsterdam

OpenMP Architecture Review Board appoints New CEO

PRACE grants 721 million compute hours on Tier-0 systems to twenty-four European research projects and opens new call for Project Access

PRACE Tier-1 Workshop 2011 issues Call for Participation

USFlash

ARM discloses technical details of the next version of the ARM architecture

Grid Dynamics unveils DevOps Catalyst

SGI establishes new world record Apache Hadoop Benchmark

Cloudera and SGI partner to take high performance computing on Apache Hadoop to the next level

New IBM software helps analyze the world's data for health care transformation

Astronomers pin down galaxy collision rates by comparing Hubble images to supercomputer simulations

NASA Ames inks Lustre support deal with Whamcloud

Quantum computer components 'coalesce' to 'converse'

Idemitsu Petroleum Norge selects HP for business continuity

Targetbase adopts Oracle Exadata Database Machine for real-time data warehousing

Diamonds, silver and the quest for single photons

IBM launches Netezza appliance to help communications services providers analyze networks and gain consumer insight

Univa appoints veteran Head of Sales

SAS Alliances bring analytical innovation to businesses

New hybrid technology could bring 'quantum information systems'