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Primeur weekly 2019-09-09

Quantum computing

New quantum project aims for ultra-secure communication in Europe ...

Schrödinger and Qu & Co announce collaboration to advance quantum mechanical computations on quantum computers ...

Spreading light over quantum computers ...

Focus on Europe

AUBASS' AUTOSAR Adaptive Platform solution ported on Kalray's intelligent processor ...

eScience Center takes part in hackathon to improve tools for analysis of internet therapies ...

At the edge of chaos, powerful new electronics could be created ...

Middleware

2CRSI becomes a Bright reseller in the USA, Europe and Middle East ...

NERSC and ECP host OpenMP Hackathon for energy-efficient architectures ...

Hardware

Shell and PDENH are investing in Dutch sustainable data centre technology scale-up Asperitas ...

Konstantinos Orginos awarded time on world's fastest supercomputer to study Lattice QCD ...

GRC teams with NVIDIA to provide fully optimized liquid-immersion cooled system to support the Texas Advanced Computing Center's Frontera supercomputer ...

Mellanox introduces new LinkX 200G & 400G cables & transceivers at CIOE, Shenzhen, China and ECOC, Dublin, Ireland 2019 ...

Texas boosts U.S. science with fastest academic supercomputer in the world ...

New insulation technique paves the way for more powerful and smaller chips ...

WekaIO awarded three patents ...

Intel Xeon Scalable processors drive advanced research in world's fastest academic supercomputer ...

Applications

Rochester Institute of Technology researchers use Frontera supercomputer to simulate neutron star mergers ...

Researchers use TACC's new Frontera supercomputer to simulate viruses and cells ...

Teaching Neural Networks Quantum Chemistry ...

Building a sunnier energy future ...

Researchers apply increasing computational power to develop predictive models and create patient-specific treatment plans ...

Researchers will simulate high speed turbulent flows on Frontera supercomputer ...

U.S. National Science Foundation awards San Diego Supercomputer Center and partners $5,9 million to host EarthCube Office ...

Researchers uncover role of earthquake motions in triggering a 'surprise' tsunami ...

Artificial Intelligence for Physics Research ...

NCSA machine learning pipeline provides insight into energy-efficient home improvement programmes ...

Eight projects to gain early access to the Frontier supercomputer ...

New Berkeley Lab study uses supercomputers to analyze hydrological changes in a California watershed following a wildfire ...

PPG selected for DOE partnership to speed development, testing of adhesives for lightweight vehicles ...

Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved - using real life planetary computer ...

Researchers will simulate high speed turbulent flows on Frontera supercomputer


Turbulence comes in from the left in this image, hitting the shock, and leaving the domain from the right. This three-dimensional picture shows the structure of enstrophy and colored by local Mach number with the shock at gray. Credit: Chang-Hsin Chen, TAMU.
3 Sep 2019 Austin - Nobel laureate Richard Feynman once called turbulence "the most important unsolved problem of classical physics". That's because the chaotic motion of turbulence can't be neatly solved with equations. Turbulence is so complicated that scientists today try to simplify it as much as possible but still retain the basic physics of it. One of the simplifications is to assume that the general motion of turbulence, its flow, is incompressible or of constant density. This simplification works as a good approximation of low speed flows, but it falls apart for high speed turbulent flows, which are important for a wide variety of applications and phenomena such as the mixing of fuel in combustion engines of cars, planes, and rockets.
Diego Donzis, professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A&M University, an early user of the Frontera supercomputer.

"On Frontera, we would like to run some of the simulations that will allow us to answer some long-standing and new questions we have about the process of mixing in compressible flows", stated Diego Donzis, an associate professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University.

Diego Donzis is an early user of the Frontera system, but he's no stranger to National Science Foundation (NSF) supercomputers. He's developed his group's code, called Compressible Direct Numerical Simulations (cDNS) through Teragrid allocations on the LeMieux system at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center; Blue Horizon at the San Diego Supercomputer Center; later through the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) on Kraken at the National Institute for Computational Sciences; Stampede1, Stampede2 and now Frontera at TACC. What's more, Diego Donzis and colleagues have scaled cDNS up to a million cores on Department of Energy supercomputers Titan and Mira.

"Only recently, with computers reaching very high levels of parallelism, can we tackle problems in compressible turbulence at conditions that are relevant to applications", Diego Donzis stated.

More computing power translates to added detail in computer models, which can solve more equations that capture the interactions between turbulence and temperature, pressure, and density - features not accounted for in incompressible flows.

"Frontera will be well-suited for us to run these simulations", Diego Donzis explained. "Mainly it's the size of Frontera, which will make some of these unprecedented simulations possible. Also, something attractive to us is that it's based on well-known architectures; well-known components. We can predict, we hope more or less accurately, how the code will behave, even at very large scales on Frontera. We believe that a full-scale, full machine run on Frontera will be very efficient."

Diego Donzis hopes that he will be able to solve some of the long-standing questions that scientists are not able to solve today. "Some of the questions that we are tackling are impossible to solve either from theory or experiment", he stated. "Given the size of Frontera, and the way in which it's accessible to scientists of all disciplines, I think it can make a huge difference in how we design new engineering devices and, ultimately, how we understand nature and the world around us."

Another project that Diego Donzis is pushing for on Frontera is developing numerical schemes for exascale computing - the next great frontier for supercomputing on the order of processing power of the human brain. Most computer scientists agree that fundamental changes are needed in programming in order to run efficiently on exascale machines, with a billion processing elements or more. The big obstacle, said Diego Donzis, are bottlenecks in the communication and synchronization between processing elements.

"We are developing numerical schemes that can actually avoid, or significantly mitigate, the cost associated with communication and synchronization among a billion processing elements", Diego Donzis stated. "We call these asynchronous tolerant schemes. These are numerical schemes to solve turbulent flows which do not need to wait for messages to be passed between processors." This removes, at a mathematical level, synchronization between processing elements, which can bypass the latency and overhead associated with parallelism at its very highest levels.

Diego Donzis has been researching asynchronous tolerance schemes on the Stampede2 system, and he hopes to continue the work on Frontera. "Although Frontera is not an exascale machine, it will allow us to test some of these developments that we've been doing over the last few years at a scale that we were not able to do before. We have some preliminary tests on Frontera with very promising results. We look forward to running those on the full machine", Diego Donzis stated.

Another simulated view of turbulence coming from the left, hitting the shock, and leaving the domain from the right. The two-dimensional picture is Q-criterion and the shock is the thin blue line. Credit: Chang-Hsin Chen, TAMU.
Source: University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center - TACC

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-09-09

Quantum computing

New quantum project aims for ultra-secure communication in Europe ...

Schrödinger and Qu & Co announce collaboration to advance quantum mechanical computations on quantum computers ...

Spreading light over quantum computers ...

Focus on Europe

AUBASS' AUTOSAR Adaptive Platform solution ported on Kalray's intelligent processor ...

eScience Center takes part in hackathon to improve tools for analysis of internet therapies ...

At the edge of chaos, powerful new electronics could be created ...

Middleware

2CRSI becomes a Bright reseller in the USA, Europe and Middle East ...

NERSC and ECP host OpenMP Hackathon for energy-efficient architectures ...

Hardware

Shell and PDENH are investing in Dutch sustainable data centre technology scale-up Asperitas ...

Konstantinos Orginos awarded time on world's fastest supercomputer to study Lattice QCD ...

GRC teams with NVIDIA to provide fully optimized liquid-immersion cooled system to support the Texas Advanced Computing Center's Frontera supercomputer ...

Mellanox introduces new LinkX 200G & 400G cables & transceivers at CIOE, Shenzhen, China and ECOC, Dublin, Ireland 2019 ...

Texas boosts U.S. science with fastest academic supercomputer in the world ...

New insulation technique paves the way for more powerful and smaller chips ...

WekaIO awarded three patents ...

Intel Xeon Scalable processors drive advanced research in world's fastest academic supercomputer ...

Applications

Rochester Institute of Technology researchers use Frontera supercomputer to simulate neutron star mergers ...

Researchers use TACC's new Frontera supercomputer to simulate viruses and cells ...

Teaching Neural Networks Quantum Chemistry ...

Building a sunnier energy future ...

Researchers apply increasing computational power to develop predictive models and create patient-specific treatment plans ...

Researchers will simulate high speed turbulent flows on Frontera supercomputer ...

U.S. National Science Foundation awards San Diego Supercomputer Center and partners $5,9 million to host EarthCube Office ...

Researchers uncover role of earthquake motions in triggering a 'surprise' tsunami ...

Artificial Intelligence for Physics Research ...

NCSA machine learning pipeline provides insight into energy-efficient home improvement programmes ...

Eight projects to gain early access to the Frontier supercomputer ...

New Berkeley Lab study uses supercomputers to analyze hydrological changes in a California watershed following a wildfire ...

PPG selected for DOE partnership to speed development, testing of adhesives for lightweight vehicles ...

Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved - using real life planetary computer ...