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Primeur weekly 2014-09-29

The Cloud

IBM opens new Cloud resiliency centre ...

Luxury mobile phone manufacturer Vertu selects Altair’s HyperWorks Unlimited plug-and-play private Cloud solution for computer-aided engineering ...

Boston University receives NSF grant to develop 'smart city' Cloud platform ...

NetApp introduces software-defined object Storage for the hybrid Cloud ...

EuroFlash

PRACE-3IP PCP project to launch execution phase 1 of whole-system design for energy efficient HPC ...

Bull launches its new novascale gcos enterprise servers to support data centre transformation for the Cloud and Big Data ...

Final proof for optimal encoding strategies in optical communication ...

ISC 2015 is now open for submissions and other participation opportunities ...

From diamonds to supercomputers ...

Unique maritime co-operation around MARIN's new fast CFD facility ...

USFlash

Curtiss-Wright unveils its lightest and most powerful 4th gen Intel Core i7 rugged mission computer ...

HP offers no-cost VSA software with Intel Xeon processor E5 v3–based servers and single-click installation on new HP ProLiant Gen9 Server models ...

NSF grants $1 million to Missouri University to expand supercomputer equipment and expertise ...

Eurocom Panther 5 has broken the 8 TB storage barrier ...

Utah engineers unlock potential for faster computing ...

With NIH grant, Cedars-Sinai helps bring Big Data to neuro disease research ...

Putting the squeeze on quantum information ...

Cray awarded $26 million supercomputer contract from the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Programme ...

Lenovo set to close acquisition of IBM's x86 server business ...

Syracuse's new cooling system heats up physics research ...

Utah engineers unlock potential for faster computing

22 Sep 2014 - University of Utah engineers discovered a way to create a special material - a metal layer on top of a silicon semiconductor - that could lead to cost-effective, superfast computers that perform lightning-fast calculations but don't overheat.

This new "topological insulator" behaves like an insulator on the inside but conducts electricity on the outside and may pave the way for quantum computers and fast spintronic devices.

The research, led by University of Utah materials science and engineering professor Feng Liu, was published in the journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Since the discovery of topological insulators almost a decade ago as a class of material designed to speed up computers, scientists have been trying to create a topological insulator that creates a large energy gap.

An energy gap is the amount of energy it takes for electrons to conduct electricity in a given material. A larger gap allows electricity to be conducted on a material's surface so a computer can operate at room temperature while remaining stable. Feng Liu and his team found that bismuth metal deposited on the silicon can result in a more stable large-gap topological insulator. But just as important, this process can be cost-effective and readily integrated with current widespread silicon semiconductor manufacturing techniques.

"We can put it on silicon so it can be married or combined with the existing semiconductor technology", Feng Liu stated. "This is very important. It makes it more experimentally feasible and practically realistic."

Because the bismuth layer is atomically bonded but electronically isolated from the silicon layer, it creates a large energy gap.

"It has the largest energy gap that was ever predicted. It makes room-temperature applications a possibility for topological insulator-based devices or computers", Feng Liu stated.

Quantum computers, which have not been built yet, would run on the principles of quantum mechanics, in which the smallest particles of light and matter can be in different places at the same time. Quantum computers theoretically could be billions of times faster than conventional computers.

Quantum computing is expected to be used in a variety of uses, including in big data centers, security systems and encryption.

Spintronics is a new technology that uses the spin of an electron - instead of charge - in electronic devices. Spin is a property of electrons that makes the electron act like a tiny magnet. Spintronic devices can be used to encode and transfer information in electronic circuits and computers.

Feng Liu’s study was funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy and partly by the National Science Foundation through the University of Utah's Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

Feng Liu conducted the research with materials science and engineering postdoctoral fellows Miao Zhou, Zheng Liu, and Zhengfei Wang, and doctoral student Wenmei Ming.
Source: Univerity of Utah

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2014-09-29

The Cloud

IBM opens new Cloud resiliency centre ...

Luxury mobile phone manufacturer Vertu selects Altair’s HyperWorks Unlimited plug-and-play private Cloud solution for computer-aided engineering ...

Boston University receives NSF grant to develop 'smart city' Cloud platform ...

NetApp introduces software-defined object Storage for the hybrid Cloud ...

EuroFlash

PRACE-3IP PCP project to launch execution phase 1 of whole-system design for energy efficient HPC ...

Bull launches its new novascale gcos enterprise servers to support data centre transformation for the Cloud and Big Data ...

Final proof for optimal encoding strategies in optical communication ...

ISC 2015 is now open for submissions and other participation opportunities ...

From diamonds to supercomputers ...

Unique maritime co-operation around MARIN's new fast CFD facility ...

USFlash

Curtiss-Wright unveils its lightest and most powerful 4th gen Intel Core i7 rugged mission computer ...

HP offers no-cost VSA software with Intel Xeon processor E5 v3–based servers and single-click installation on new HP ProLiant Gen9 Server models ...

NSF grants $1 million to Missouri University to expand supercomputer equipment and expertise ...

Eurocom Panther 5 has broken the 8 TB storage barrier ...

Utah engineers unlock potential for faster computing ...

With NIH grant, Cedars-Sinai helps bring Big Data to neuro disease research ...

Putting the squeeze on quantum information ...

Cray awarded $26 million supercomputer contract from the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Programme ...

Lenovo set to close acquisition of IBM's x86 server business ...

Syracuse's new cooling system heats up physics research ...