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Primeur weekly 2013-09-16

Special

Sensor Cloud network - a new infrastructure for clever applications ...

The Cloud

Bright Computing nominated for the 2013 Deloitte Rising Star Award ...

Harnessing the petabyte at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute ...

New system allows Cloud customers to detect programme-tampering ...

IBM launches Digital Marketing Network in the Cloud to help companies improve marketing performance in real-time ...

Desktop Grids

Successful BOINC:FAST event in Russia ...

TheSkyNet - T2 is born ...

EuroFlash

ParallWare v0.1b released ...

Promising hybrid computer architecture at CSCS ...

Science and Industry join hands: 1st Meeting of the PRACE Industrial Advisory Committee ...

More than 70 students from 4 continents gain HPC skills at fourth annual Summer School ...

PRACE 8th Call is open between 3 September and 15 October 2013 ...

Dassault Systemes unveils the SOLIDWORKS 2014 product portfolio ...

USFlash

US Energy Secretary Moniz dedicates Clean Energy Research Center and new supercomputer ...

Louisiana State University CCT's researchers develop Melete, among first interactive supercomputers ...

SGI achieves even higher levels of performance, scale and efficiency in its SGI ICE X and Rackable server lines by adding the new Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v2 ...

Cray supercomputers now available with the new Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 V2 product family ...

Intel introduces highly versatile data centre processor family architected for new era of services ...

Adaptive's Moab HPC Suite to optimize new supercomputer at National Scientific User Facility in Washington ...

Indiana University and Internet2 celebrate 15-year partnership for advanced research and education networks ...

Continuing recovery in low-end HPC systems fuels 7.9% growth in the second quarter, according to IDC ...

IBM introduces NeXtScale system: High Performance Computing experience and technology move from the lab to the data centre ...

New centre to better understand human intelligence and build smarter machines ...

Don Bosco University links to National Knowledge Network ...

Cisco unveils nPower, world's most advanced network processor ...

The '50-50' chip: Memory device of the future? ...

Software may be able to take over from hardware in managing caches ...

New system allows Cloud customers to detect programme-tampering

11 Sep 2013 Cambridge - For small and midsize organisations, the outsourcing of demanding computational tasks to the Cloud - huge banks of computers accessible over the Internet - can be much more cost-effective than buying their own hardware. But it also poses a security risk: A malicious hacker could rent space on a cloud server and use it to launch programmes that hijack legitimate applications, interfering with their execution.

In August, at the International Cryptology Conference, researchers from MIT and Israel's Technion and Tel Aviv University presented a new system that can quickly verify that a programme running on the Cloud is executing properly. That amounts to a guarantee that no malicious code is interfering with the programme's execution.

The same system also protects the data used by applications running in the Cloud, cryptographically ensuring that the user won't learn anything other than the immediate results of the requested computation. If, for instance, hospitals were pooling medical data in a huge database hosted on the Cloud, researchers could look for patterns in the data without compromising patient privacy.

Although the paper reports new theoretical results, the researchers have also built working code that implements their system. At present, it works only with programmes written in the C programming language, but adapting it to other languages should be straightforward.

The new work, like much current research on secure computation, requires that computer programmes be represented as circuits. So the researchers' system includes a "circuit generator" that automatically converts C code to circuit diagrams. The circuits it produces, however, are much smaller than those produced by its predecessors, so by itself, the circuit generator may find other applications in cryptography.

Alessandro Chiesa, a graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science at MIT and one of the paper's authors, said that because the new system protects both the integrity of programmes running

in the Cloud and the data they use, it's a good complement to the cryptographic technique known as homomorphic encryption, which protects the data transmitted by the users of Cloud applications.

Joining Alessandro Chiesa on the paper are Madars Virza, also a graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science; the Technion's Daniel Genkin and Eli Ben-Sasson, who was a visiting professor at MIT for the past two years; and Tel Aviv University's Eran Tromer, who was a postdoc at MIT. The researchers' system implements a so-called zero-knowledge proof, a type of mathematical game invented by MIT professors Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali and their colleague Charles Rackoff of the

University of Toronto. In its cryptographic application, a zero-knowledge proof enables one of the game's players to prove to the other that he or she knows a secret key without actually divulging it.

But as its name implies, a zero-knowledge proof is a more general method for proving mathematical theorems - and the correct execution of a computer programme can be redescribed as a theorem. So zero-knowledge proofs are by definition able to establish whether or not a computer programme is executing correctly.

The problem is that existing implementations of zero-knowledge proofs - except in cases where they've been tailored to particular algorithms - take as long to execute as the programmes they're trying to verify. That's fine for password verification, but not for a computation substantial enough that it might be farmed out to the Cloud.

The researchers' innovation is a practical, succinct zero-knowledge proof for arbitrary programmes. Indeed, it's so succinct that it can typically fit in a single data packet.

As Alessandro Chiesa explains, his and his colleagues' approach depends on a variation of what's known as a "probabilistically checkable proof", or PCP. "With a standard mathematical proof, if you want to verify it, you have to go line by line from the start to the end", Alessandro Chiesa stated. "If you were to skip one line, potentially, that could fool you. Traditional proofs are very fragile in this respect." "The PCP theorem says that there is a way to rewrite proofs so that instead of reading them line by line", Alessandro Chiesa added, "what you can do is flip a few coins and probabilistically sample three or four lines and have a probabilistic guarantee that it's correct."

The problem, Madars Virza said, is that "the current known constructions of the PCP theorem, though great in theory, have quite bad practical realizations". That's because the theory assumes that an adversary who's trying to produce a fraudulent proof has unbounded computational capacity. What Alessandro Chiesa, Madars Virza and their colleagues do instead is assume that the adversary is capable only of performing simple linear operations.

"This assumption is, of course, false in practice", Madars Virza stated. "So we use a cryptographic encoding to force the adversary to only linear evaluations. There is a way to encode numbers into such a form that you can add those numbers, but you can't do anything else. This is how we sidestep the inefficiencies of the PCP theorem."
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology - MIT

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2013-09-16

Special

Sensor Cloud network - a new infrastructure for clever applications ...

The Cloud

Bright Computing nominated for the 2013 Deloitte Rising Star Award ...

Harnessing the petabyte at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute ...

New system allows Cloud customers to detect programme-tampering ...

IBM launches Digital Marketing Network in the Cloud to help companies improve marketing performance in real-time ...

Desktop Grids

Successful BOINC:FAST event in Russia ...

TheSkyNet - T2 is born ...

EuroFlash

ParallWare v0.1b released ...

Promising hybrid computer architecture at CSCS ...

Science and Industry join hands: 1st Meeting of the PRACE Industrial Advisory Committee ...

More than 70 students from 4 continents gain HPC skills at fourth annual Summer School ...

PRACE 8th Call is open between 3 September and 15 October 2013 ...

Dassault Systemes unveils the SOLIDWORKS 2014 product portfolio ...

USFlash

US Energy Secretary Moniz dedicates Clean Energy Research Center and new supercomputer ...

Louisiana State University CCT's researchers develop Melete, among first interactive supercomputers ...

SGI achieves even higher levels of performance, scale and efficiency in its SGI ICE X and Rackable server lines by adding the new Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v2 ...

Cray supercomputers now available with the new Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 V2 product family ...

Intel introduces highly versatile data centre processor family architected for new era of services ...

Adaptive's Moab HPC Suite to optimize new supercomputer at National Scientific User Facility in Washington ...

Indiana University and Internet2 celebrate 15-year partnership for advanced research and education networks ...

Continuing recovery in low-end HPC systems fuels 7.9% growth in the second quarter, according to IDC ...

IBM introduces NeXtScale system: High Performance Computing experience and technology move from the lab to the data centre ...

New centre to better understand human intelligence and build smarter machines ...

Don Bosco University links to National Knowledge Network ...

Cisco unveils nPower, world's most advanced network processor ...

The '50-50' chip: Memory device of the future? ...

Software may be able to take over from hardware in managing caches ...