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Primeur weekly 2020-08-10

Focus

HPC markets show temporary negative COVID-19 ripple effect but will be back on track after crisis fades, says Intersect360 Research analyst Addison Snell ...

EPCC led EIDF will train 100.000 citizens over the next decade to take part in the Edinburgh International Data Facility powered by HPE ...

Exascale supercomputing

Jülich Supercomputing Centre to introduce new AI project AlphaNumerics Zero ...

GE Research uses Summit supercomputer for groundbreaking study on wind power ...

US Department of Energy to provide $57,5 million for science computing teams ...

Quantum computing

Solving materials problems with a quantum computer ...

International quantum research to take a leap forward ...

Northern Arizona University partners in $26 million NSF initiative to establish new Center for Quantum Networks ...

Focus on Europe

Atos partners with University of Oxford on largest AI supercomputer in the UK ...

JURECA data-centric module to replace JURECA Cluster ...

Open source for a global 'energiewende' ...

Skoltech supercomputer helps scientists reveal most influential parameters for crop ...

Middleware

NCCS debuts centralized storage with curated Earth science datasets ...

Hardware

Nanyang Technological University Singapore scientists build ultra-high-speed Terahertz wireless chip ...

Flash Memory Summit partners with TechTarget to extend digital reach ...

Tachyum shows Prodigy running existing x86, ARM, and RISC-V software ...

Panasas launches the new PanFS with dynamic data acceleration technology to support diverse and changing workflows in HPC and AI ...

Todd Younkin appointed President and CEO of Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) ...

CENIC extends 400G capabilities to coastal path between Los Angeles and Sunnyvale ...

Applications

A computational framework for solving linear inverse problems takes a parallel computing approach ...

Unequal neutron-star mergers create unique 'bang' in simulations ...

BSC researchers study mobility in Spain during the COVID-19 pandemic period using data from the Facebook and Google apps ...

Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure ...

New spin-off created by BSC researchers to accelerate the development of new chemicals ...

Argonne researchers use Theta for real-time analysis of COVID-19 proteins ...

ALCC programme awards ALCF computing time to 24 projects ...

ALCC programme awards nearly 6 million Summit node hours across 31 projects ...

Comet supercomputer used to simulate environmental changes in Chesapeake Bay ...

Piotr Roztocki wins 2020 Paul Baran Young Scholar Award for his innovative work ...

Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level ...

Tiniest secrets of integrated circuits revealed with new imaging technique ...

Computing COVID-19's potential cure and treatments in Australia ...

National Science Foundation funds five new XSEDE-allocated systems ...

Tiniest secrets of integrated circuits revealed with new imaging technique

5 Aug 2020 London - The life-givers of integrated circuits and quantum devices in silicon are small structures made from patches of foreign atoms called dopants. The dopant structures provide charge carriers that flow through the components of the circuit, giving the components their ability to function. These days the dopant structures are only a few atoms across and so need to be made in precise locations within a circuit and have very well-defined electrical properties. At present manufacturers find it hard to tell in a non-destructive way whether they have made their devices according to these strict requirements. A new imaging paradigm promises to change all that.

The imaging mode called broadband electric force microscopy, developed by Dr. Georg Gramse at Keysight technologies & JKU uses a very sharp probe that sends electromagnetic waves into a silicon chip, to image and localize dopant structures underneath the surface. Dr. Gramse said that because the microscope can use waves with many frequencies it can provide a wealth of previously inaccessible detail about the electrical environment around the dopant structures. The extra information is crucial to predicting how well the devices will ultimately perform.

The imaging approach was tested on two tiny dopant structures made with a templating process which is unique in achieving atomically sharp interfaces between differently doped regions. Dr. Tomas Skeren at IBM produced the world's first electronic diode - a circuit component which passes current in only one direction - fabricated with this templating process, while Dr. Alex Kölker at University College London created a multilevel 3D device with atomic scale precision.

The results, published in the journal Nature Electronics , demonstrate that the technique can take pictures and resolve as few as 200 dopant atoms even if they are hidden below the same number of Si atoms. It can tell the difference between certain flavours of dopant atoms, and can also provide information about the way charge carriers move through the structures and about atomic-sized 'traps' that can stop them from moving.

Professor Neil Curson, who leads the group at University College London, stated: "This research could not have come at a better time for the massive world-wide effort to make smaller electronics or quantum computers in silicon. While the success in making components smaller and more complicated has been spectacular, the technology required to actually observe what is being made has not been keeping up. This has become a major problem for quality control in silicon chip manufacture and for information security, when you can't see what's inside the chips you are making or buying. Our new research will help solve many of these issues."

Dr. Andreas Fuhrer from IBM Research, added: "After learning to make the first tiny dopant device structures consisting of two different dopant species, boron and phosphorous, it was extremely useful to work with this international team to discover subtle details about our structures that would just not be possible in any other way."

Source: University College London

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2020-08-10

Focus

HPC markets show temporary negative COVID-19 ripple effect but will be back on track after crisis fades, says Intersect360 Research analyst Addison Snell ...

EPCC led EIDF will train 100.000 citizens over the next decade to take part in the Edinburgh International Data Facility powered by HPE ...

Exascale supercomputing

Jülich Supercomputing Centre to introduce new AI project AlphaNumerics Zero ...

GE Research uses Summit supercomputer for groundbreaking study on wind power ...

US Department of Energy to provide $57,5 million for science computing teams ...

Quantum computing

Solving materials problems with a quantum computer ...

International quantum research to take a leap forward ...

Northern Arizona University partners in $26 million NSF initiative to establish new Center for Quantum Networks ...

Focus on Europe

Atos partners with University of Oxford on largest AI supercomputer in the UK ...

JURECA data-centric module to replace JURECA Cluster ...

Open source for a global 'energiewende' ...

Skoltech supercomputer helps scientists reveal most influential parameters for crop ...

Middleware

NCCS debuts centralized storage with curated Earth science datasets ...

Hardware

Nanyang Technological University Singapore scientists build ultra-high-speed Terahertz wireless chip ...

Flash Memory Summit partners with TechTarget to extend digital reach ...

Tachyum shows Prodigy running existing x86, ARM, and RISC-V software ...

Panasas launches the new PanFS with dynamic data acceleration technology to support diverse and changing workflows in HPC and AI ...

Todd Younkin appointed President and CEO of Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) ...

CENIC extends 400G capabilities to coastal path between Los Angeles and Sunnyvale ...

Applications

A computational framework for solving linear inverse problems takes a parallel computing approach ...

Unequal neutron-star mergers create unique 'bang' in simulations ...

BSC researchers study mobility in Spain during the COVID-19 pandemic period using data from the Facebook and Google apps ...

Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure ...

New spin-off created by BSC researchers to accelerate the development of new chemicals ...

Argonne researchers use Theta for real-time analysis of COVID-19 proteins ...

ALCC programme awards ALCF computing time to 24 projects ...

ALCC programme awards nearly 6 million Summit node hours across 31 projects ...

Comet supercomputer used to simulate environmental changes in Chesapeake Bay ...

Piotr Roztocki wins 2020 Paul Baran Young Scholar Award for his innovative work ...

Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level ...

Tiniest secrets of integrated circuits revealed with new imaging technique ...

Computing COVID-19's potential cure and treatments in Australia ...

National Science Foundation funds five new XSEDE-allocated systems ...