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Primeur weekly 2019-08-05

Quantum computing

Imaging of exotic quantum particles as building blocks for quantum computing ...

Travelling towards a quantum internet at light speed ...

New toolkit for photonics: Quantum simulation by light radio ...

Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution ...

Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds ...

Focus on Europe

Hungary, Portugal and Poland sign up to EU quantum communication infrastructure initiative ...

Middleware

Whiskytree chooses Panasas to address high-performance storage conditions for expanding visual effects facility ...

EXTEN Technologies announces version 3.0 of its HyperDynamic NVMe over Fabrics storage software with enhanced high-performance resiliency features ...

Raid Media Systems signs up as a Bright Reseller to target German supercomputing market ...

Hardware

Tachyum CEO presents "Flash Solutions for the Skyrocketing AI/ML Applications Market" at Flash Memory Summit ...

Granular aluminum for future computers ...

Optalysys appoints world renowned Silicon Photonics expert, Professor Thomas F. Krauss, to their Scientific Advisory Board ...

University of Vermont completes warp-speed upgrade of its supercomputer ...

Kalray announces the tape-out of Coolidge on TSMC 16nm process technology ...

Kalray unveils support of NVMe/TCP to ease and accelerate data centre storage disaggregation ...

Submer immersion cooling announces new North American headquarters in "Data Center Alley" ...

OLCF and tech company Providentia Worldwide build intelligence system for supercomputer cooling plant ...

William Kramer chosen to lead Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center ...

Simulating hurricanes with Blue Waters ...

Applications

Bubbles hold clue to improved industrial structures ...

NCSA collaborates with NGA to create the world's most powerful geospatial system ...

Oregon State University College of Engineering accelerates research, teaching with $2,6 million investment in AI computing resources ...

Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion ...

Scientists use Titan for complex cosmology studies ...

ALCC programme awards 6 million hours on OLCF resources ...

Researchers benchmarked a range of advanced combustion strategies on the Titan supercomputer ...

The fragile balance of the most productive ecosystems ...

The Cloud

SDSC awarded NSF grant for Triton Shared Computing Cluster upgrade ...

IBM transforms its software to be Cloud-native and run on any Cloud with Red Hat ...

Google Cloud and VMware extend strategic partnership ...

Granular aluminum for future computers


The fluxonium qubit containing granular aluminum can remain in a state between "0" and "1" for a time of up to 30 microseconds. Fig. Ioan Pop, KIT.
1 Aug 2019 Karlsruhe - Computers based on quantum mechanical principles can solve certain tasks particularly efficiently. Their information carriers, the so-called qubits, not only have the values "0" and "1", but also states in between, called superposition states. However, maintaining such a state is difficult. Scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now used granular aluminum - nicknamed grAl - for qubits and have shown that this superconducting material has great potential to overcome the previous limits of quantum hardware.

Quantum computers are considered the computers of the future. You can in principle process large amounts of data much quicker than with current classical computers. While classical computers perform one step at a time, quantum computers can be regarded as taking many steps in parallel, in so-called quantum parallelism. The information carrier for the quantum computer is the quantum bit, qubit in short. For qubits not only the states "0" and "1" are relevant, but also the states in between, the quantum mechanical superposition of states. Their processing is done according to quantum mechanical principles, such as entanglement, which preserves instant correlations between qubit states to arbitrary long distances.

"Producing qubits that are small enough and that can be switched quickly enough to perform quantum calculations is a huge challenge", explained physicist Dr. Ioan Pop, Head of the Kinetic Inductance Quantum Systems research group at the Physics Institute (PHI) and KIT's Institute of Nanotechnology (INT). A promising option is superconducting circuits. Superconductors are materials that have no electrical resistance at extremely low temperatures, therefore they conduct electricity without losses. This is crucial in order to preserve the quantum states and to smoothly interconnect qubits, resulting in higher computing power. Big companies like IBM, Intel, Microsoft and Google are working to scale up superconducting quantum processors.

One major difficulty, however, is maintaining the quantum state. Interactions with the environment can lead to the decay of the quantum state, the so-called decoherence. The more qubits are used, the harder it is to maintain coherence. Researchers at the PHI, INT and IPE of KIT and the National University for Research and Technology MISIS in Moscow have now used for the first time granular aluminum as superconducting material for high coherence qubits.

As the scientists report in the journalNature Materials, they measured a grAl fluxonium qubit with coherence time of up to 30 microseconds - this is the time in which the qubit can remain in a state between "0" and "1". This time may sound short, but it is actually encouragingly long compared with the typical 0.01 microsecond time required for the qubit operation. "Our results show that granular aluminum can open avenues of research for a new class of complex qubit designs and help overcome the current limitations of quantum computing", explained Dr. Ioan Pop from the KIT.

Lukas Grünhaupt, Martin Spiecker, Daria Gusenkova, Nataliya Maleeva, Sebastian T. Skacel, Ivan Takmakov, Francesco Valenti, Patrick Winkel, Hannes Rotzinger, Wolfgang Wernsdorfer, Alexey V. Ustinov and Ioan M. Pop are the authors of the paper titled " Granular aluminium as a superconducting material for high-impedance quantum circuits ". It has been published inNature Materials, 2019 - DOI: 10.1038/s41563-019-0350-3.
Source: Karlsruher Institut für Technologie - KIT

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-08-05

Quantum computing

Imaging of exotic quantum particles as building blocks for quantum computing ...

Travelling towards a quantum internet at light speed ...

New toolkit for photonics: Quantum simulation by light radio ...

Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution ...

Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds ...

Focus on Europe

Hungary, Portugal and Poland sign up to EU quantum communication infrastructure initiative ...

Middleware

Whiskytree chooses Panasas to address high-performance storage conditions for expanding visual effects facility ...

EXTEN Technologies announces version 3.0 of its HyperDynamic NVMe over Fabrics storage software with enhanced high-performance resiliency features ...

Raid Media Systems signs up as a Bright Reseller to target German supercomputing market ...

Hardware

Tachyum CEO presents "Flash Solutions for the Skyrocketing AI/ML Applications Market" at Flash Memory Summit ...

Granular aluminum for future computers ...

Optalysys appoints world renowned Silicon Photonics expert, Professor Thomas F. Krauss, to their Scientific Advisory Board ...

University of Vermont completes warp-speed upgrade of its supercomputer ...

Kalray announces the tape-out of Coolidge on TSMC 16nm process technology ...

Kalray unveils support of NVMe/TCP to ease and accelerate data centre storage disaggregation ...

Submer immersion cooling announces new North American headquarters in "Data Center Alley" ...

OLCF and tech company Providentia Worldwide build intelligence system for supercomputer cooling plant ...

William Kramer chosen to lead Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center ...

Simulating hurricanes with Blue Waters ...

Applications

Bubbles hold clue to improved industrial structures ...

NCSA collaborates with NGA to create the world's most powerful geospatial system ...

Oregon State University College of Engineering accelerates research, teaching with $2,6 million investment in AI computing resources ...

Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion ...

Scientists use Titan for complex cosmology studies ...

ALCC programme awards 6 million hours on OLCF resources ...

Researchers benchmarked a range of advanced combustion strategies on the Titan supercomputer ...

The fragile balance of the most productive ecosystems ...

The Cloud

SDSC awarded NSF grant for Triton Shared Computing Cluster upgrade ...

IBM transforms its software to be Cloud-native and run on any Cloud with Red Hat ...

Google Cloud and VMware extend strategic partnership ...