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Primeur weekly 2018-08-13

Focus

DEEP-EST project is exploring the nuts and bolts of mildly disruptive modular supercomputing architecture ...

Gidel's FPGAs only use 1% of their capacity for lossless compression and encryption ...

German HPC and EuroHPC, a question of competitive collaboration benefiting science ...

Quantum computing

NSF launches effort to create practical quantum computer ...

The Rigetti 128-qubit chip and what it means for quantum ...

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons ...

Tying electrons down with nanoribbons ...

Focus on Europe

Falling moons: When proto-Earth met its makers - German and Israeli supercomputers spend 100 weeks crunching astronomical numbers ...

PRACE SHAPE Programme supports three further SMEs ...

High Performance Computing for a better agriculture ...

ExCAPE: developing new medicines with high performance computing ...

RDA Grants for Early Careers and Experts - Join the 12th RDA Plenary, 5-8 November 2018, Botswana as part of the International Data Week 2018 ...

Middleware

NetApp and NVIDIA supercharge deep learning with new AI architecture ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center hosting sixth meeting of the MVAPICH Users Group ...

Julia 1.0 has now been released ...

Hardware

Supermicro opens new era of petascale computing with a family of all-flash NVMe 1U systems scalable up to a petabyte of high performance storage ...

DDN building new flash enterprise virtualisation and analytics division with 100 new hires planned through September ...

Co-construction of the future university: Sugon signs with XJTLU ...

Intel launches world's densest, totally silent solid state drive ...

Intel's vision for the future of memory and storage with Optane + QLC ...

University of Texas at Arlington researcher working to use computer cache to speed up memory access ...

Applications

Blue Waters professor Kaiyu Guan receives AGU Early Career Award ...

NCSA Brown Dog project wins Best Technical Paper at PEARC18 ...

2018 NCSA Blue Waters Symposium presentations now available ...

Supercomputer simulations show new target in HIV-1 replication ...

NSF launches effort to create practical quantum computer


A fabricated trap that researchers use to capture and control atomic ion qubits (quantum bits). Credit: K. Hudek, Ion Q&E / E. Edwards, JQI.
7 Aug 2018 Alexandria - From codebreaking to aircraft design, complex problems in a wide range of fields exist that even today's best computers cannot solve. To accelerate the development of a practical quantum computer that will one day answer currently unsolvable research questions, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $15 million over five years to the multi-institution Software-Tailored Architecture for Quantum co-design (STAQ) project.

"Quantum computers will change everything about the technology we use and how we use it, and we are still taking the initial steps toward realizing this goal", stated NSF Director France Córdova. "Developing the first practical quantum computer would be a major milestone. By bringing together experts who have outlined a path to a practical quantum computer and supporting its development, NSF is working to take the quantum revolution from theory to reality."

Today's quantum computers are mostly proofs of concept, demonstrating the feasibility of certain principles. While they have grown in complexity as researchers' ability to control and construct quantum systems has improved, they have not yet solved a computational problem for which the answer was unknown.

The project's integrated approach to developing a practical quantum computer relies on finding new algorithms based on optimization and scientific computing problems, improving quantum computer hardware, and developing software tools that optimize algorithm performance for the specific machine in development.

STAQ emerged from an NSF Ideas Lab, one of a series of week-long, free-form exchanges among researchers from a wide range of fields that aim to generate creative, collaborative proposals to address a given research challenge. This particular NSF Ideas Lab focused on the Practical Fully-Connected Quantum Computer challenge. STAQ will involve physicists, computer scientists and engineers from Duke University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tufts University, University of California-Berkeley, University of Chicago, University of Maryland and University of New Mexico.

The STAQ researchers will focus on four primary goals:

  • Develop a quantum computer with a sufficiently large number of quantum bits (qubits) to solve a challenging calculation.
  • Ensure that every qubit interacts with all other qubits in the system, critical for solving fundamental problems in physics.
  • Integrate software, algorithms, devices and systems engineering.
  • Involve equal input from experimentalists, theorists, engineers and computer scientists.

"The first truly effective quantum computer will not emerge from one researcher working in a single discipline", stated NSF Chief Operating Officer Fleming Crim. "Quantum computing requires experts from a range of fields, with individuals applying complementary insights to solve some of the most challenging problems in science and engineering. NSF's STAQ project uniquely addresses that need, providing a cutting-edge approach that promises to dramatically advance U.S. leadership in quantum computing."

As a cross-disciplinary project, STAQ encourages convergence across research fields and aligns with The Quantum Leap: Leading the Next Quantum Revolution, one of NSF's 10 Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments. It is funded through NSF's Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Engineering, and Computer and Information Science and Engineering directorates.

One of NSF's 10 Big Ideas, The Quantum Leap initiative aims to accelerate innovative research and provide a path forward for science and engineering to help solve one of the most critical, competitive and challenging issues of our time. Researchers will design, construct and analyze new approaches to quantum computing and test algorithms at a scale beyond the reach of simulations run on classical computers. Quantum research is essential for preparing future scientists and engineers to implement the discoveries of the next quantum revolution into technologies that will benefit the United States.

Source: National Science Foundation - NSF

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-08-13

Focus

DEEP-EST project is exploring the nuts and bolts of mildly disruptive modular supercomputing architecture ...

Gidel's FPGAs only use 1% of their capacity for lossless compression and encryption ...

German HPC and EuroHPC, a question of competitive collaboration benefiting science ...

Quantum computing

NSF launches effort to create practical quantum computer ...

The Rigetti 128-qubit chip and what it means for quantum ...

Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons ...

Tying electrons down with nanoribbons ...

Focus on Europe

Falling moons: When proto-Earth met its makers - German and Israeli supercomputers spend 100 weeks crunching astronomical numbers ...

PRACE SHAPE Programme supports three further SMEs ...

High Performance Computing for a better agriculture ...

ExCAPE: developing new medicines with high performance computing ...

RDA Grants for Early Careers and Experts - Join the 12th RDA Plenary, 5-8 November 2018, Botswana as part of the International Data Week 2018 ...

Middleware

NetApp and NVIDIA supercharge deep learning with new AI architecture ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center hosting sixth meeting of the MVAPICH Users Group ...

Julia 1.0 has now been released ...

Hardware

Supermicro opens new era of petascale computing with a family of all-flash NVMe 1U systems scalable up to a petabyte of high performance storage ...

DDN building new flash enterprise virtualisation and analytics division with 100 new hires planned through September ...

Co-construction of the future university: Sugon signs with XJTLU ...

Intel launches world's densest, totally silent solid state drive ...

Intel's vision for the future of memory and storage with Optane + QLC ...

University of Texas at Arlington researcher working to use computer cache to speed up memory access ...

Applications

Blue Waters professor Kaiyu Guan receives AGU Early Career Award ...

NCSA Brown Dog project wins Best Technical Paper at PEARC18 ...

2018 NCSA Blue Waters Symposium presentations now available ...

Supercomputer simulations show new target in HIV-1 replication ...