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Primeur weekly 2016-08-22

Special

ExaCT team shows how Legion S3D code is a tribute to co-design on the way to exascale supercomputing ...

Focus

Sunway TaihuLight's strengths and weaknesses highlighted by Jack Dongarra ...

Exascale supercomputing

Big PanDA tackles Big Data for physics and other future extreme scale scientific applications ...

Computer programming made easier ...

Quantum computing

Cryptographers from the Netherlands win 2016 Internet Defense Prize ...

Focus on Europe

STFC Daresbury Laboratory to host 2016 Hands-on Tutorial on CFD using open-source software Code_Saturne ...

Middleware

Germany joins ELIXIR ...

Columbus Collaboratory announces CognizeR, an Open Source R extension that accelerates data scientists' access to IBM Watson ...

Cycle Computing optimizes NASA tree count and climate impact research ...

GPU-accelerated computing made better with NVIDIA DCGM and PBS Professional ...

Hardware

Mellanox demonstrates accelerated NVMe over Fabrics at Intel Developers Forum ...

Nor-Tech has developed the first affordable supercomputers designed to be used in an office, rather than a data centre ...

NVIDIA CEO delivers world's first AI supercomputer in a box to OpenAI ...

AMD demonstrates breakthrough performance of next-generation Zen processor core ...

CAST and PLDA Group demonstrate x86-compliant high compression ratio GZIP acceleration on FPGA, accessible to non-FPGA experts using the QuickPlay software defined FPGA development tool ...

IBM Research - Almaden celebrates 30 years of innovation in Silicon Valley ...

Wiring reconfiguration saves millions for Trinity supercomputer ...

Cavium completes acquisition of QLogic ...

Applications

Soybean science blooms with supercomputers ...

NOAA launches America's first national water forecast model ...

Computers trounce pathologists in predicting lung cancer type, severity, researchers find ...

Star and planetary scientists get millions of hours on EU supercomputers ...

Bill Gropp named acting director of NCSA ...

Latest NERSC/Intel/Cray dungeon session yields impressive code speed-ups ...

User-friendly language for programming efficient simulations ...

New book presents how deep learning neural networks are designed ...

Liquid light switch could enable more powerful electronics ...

Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials ...

Pitt engineers receive grant to develop fast computational modelling for 3D printing ...

Environmental datasets help researchers double the number of microbial phyla known to be infected by viruses ...

Teaching machines to direct traffic through deep reinforcement learning ...

Simulations by PPPL physicists suggest that magnetic fields can calm plasma instabilities ...

New material discovery allows study of elusive Weyl fermion ...

New maths to predict dangerous hospital epidemics ...

Kx financial analytics technology tackles Big Data crop research at biotech leader Earlham Institute ...

The Cloud

New hacking technique imperceptibly changes memory virtual servers ...

Liquid light switch could enable more powerful electronics


Polariton fluid emits clockwise or anticlockwise spin light by applying electric fields to a semiconductor chip. Credit: Alexander Dreismann.
8 Aug 2016 Cambridge - Researchers have built a miniature electro-optical switch which can change the spin - or angular momentum - of a liquid form of light by applying electric fields to a semiconductor device a millionth of a metre in size. Their results, reported in the journalNature Materials, demonstrate how to bridge the gap between light and electricity, which could enable the development of ever faster and smaller electronics.

There is a fundamental disparity between the way in which information is processed and transmitted by current technologies. To process information, electrical charges are moved around on semiconductor chips; and to transmit it, light flashes are sent down optical fibres. Current methods of converting between electrical and optical signals are both inefficient and slow, and researchers have been searching for ways to incorporate the two.

In order to make electronics faster and more powerful, more transistors need to be squeezed onto semiconductor chips. For the past 50 years, the number of transistors on a single chip has doubled every two years - this is known as Moore's law. However, as chips keep getting smaller, scientists now have to deal with the quantum effects associated with individual atoms and electrons, and they are looking for alternatives to the electron as the primary carrier of information in order to keep up with Moore's law and our thirst for faster, cheaper and more powerful electronics.

The University of Cambridge researchers, led by Professor Jeremy Baumberg from the NanoPhotonics Centre, in collaboration with researchers from Mexico and Greece, have built a switch which utilises a new state of matter called a Polariton Bose-Einstein condensate in order to mix electric and optical signals, while using miniscule amounts of energy.

Polariton Bose-Einstein condensates are generated by trapping light between mirrors spaced only a few millionths of a metre apart, and letting it interact with thin slabs of semiconductor material, creating a half-light, half-matter mixture known as a polariton.

Putting lots of polaritons in the same space can induce condensation - similar to the condensation of water droplets at high humidity - and the formation of a light-matter fluid which spins clockwise (spin-up) or anticlockwise (spin-down). By applying an electric field to this system, the researchers were able to control the spin of the condensate and switch it between up and down states. The polariton fluid emits light with clockwise or anticlockwise spin, which can be sent through optical fibres for communication, converting electrical to optical signals.

"The polariton switch unifies the best properties of electronics and optics into one tiny device that can deliver at very high speeds while using minimal amounts of power", stated the paper's lead author Dr. Alexander Dreismann from Cambridge's Cavendish Laboratory.

"We have made a field-effect light switch that can bridge the gap between optics and electronics", stated co-author Dr. Hamid Ohadi, also from the Cavendish Laboratory. "We're reaching the limits of how small we can make transistors, and electronics based on liquid light could be a way of increasing the power and efficiency of the electronics we rely on."

While the prototype device works at cryogenic temperatures, the researchers are developing other materials that can operate at room temperature, so that the device may be commercialised. The other key factor for the commercialisation of the device is mass production and scalability. "Since this prototype is based on well-established fabrication technology, it has the potential to be scaled up in the near future", stated study co-author Professor Pavlos Savvidis from the FORTH institute in Crete, Greece.

The team is currently exploring options for commercialising the technology as well as integrating it with the existing technology base.

The research is funded as part of a UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) investment in the Cambridge NanoPhotonics Centre, as well as the European Research Council (ERC) and the Leverhulme Trust.

The paper is titled " A sub-femtojoule electrical spin-switch based on optically trapped polariton condensates ".
Source: University of Cambridge

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-08-22

Special

ExaCT team shows how Legion S3D code is a tribute to co-design on the way to exascale supercomputing ...

Focus

Sunway TaihuLight's strengths and weaknesses highlighted by Jack Dongarra ...

Exascale supercomputing

Big PanDA tackles Big Data for physics and other future extreme scale scientific applications ...

Computer programming made easier ...

Quantum computing

Cryptographers from the Netherlands win 2016 Internet Defense Prize ...

Focus on Europe

STFC Daresbury Laboratory to host 2016 Hands-on Tutorial on CFD using open-source software Code_Saturne ...

Middleware

Germany joins ELIXIR ...

Columbus Collaboratory announces CognizeR, an Open Source R extension that accelerates data scientists' access to IBM Watson ...

Cycle Computing optimizes NASA tree count and climate impact research ...

GPU-accelerated computing made better with NVIDIA DCGM and PBS Professional ...

Hardware

Mellanox demonstrates accelerated NVMe over Fabrics at Intel Developers Forum ...

Nor-Tech has developed the first affordable supercomputers designed to be used in an office, rather than a data centre ...

NVIDIA CEO delivers world's first AI supercomputer in a box to OpenAI ...

AMD demonstrates breakthrough performance of next-generation Zen processor core ...

CAST and PLDA Group demonstrate x86-compliant high compression ratio GZIP acceleration on FPGA, accessible to non-FPGA experts using the QuickPlay software defined FPGA development tool ...

IBM Research - Almaden celebrates 30 years of innovation in Silicon Valley ...

Wiring reconfiguration saves millions for Trinity supercomputer ...

Cavium completes acquisition of QLogic ...

Applications

Soybean science blooms with supercomputers ...

NOAA launches America's first national water forecast model ...

Computers trounce pathologists in predicting lung cancer type, severity, researchers find ...

Star and planetary scientists get millions of hours on EU supercomputers ...

Bill Gropp named acting director of NCSA ...

Latest NERSC/Intel/Cray dungeon session yields impressive code speed-ups ...

User-friendly language for programming efficient simulations ...

New book presents how deep learning neural networks are designed ...

Liquid light switch could enable more powerful electronics ...

Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials ...

Pitt engineers receive grant to develop fast computational modelling for 3D printing ...

Environmental datasets help researchers double the number of microbial phyla known to be infected by viruses ...

Teaching machines to direct traffic through deep reinforcement learning ...

Simulations by PPPL physicists suggest that magnetic fields can calm plasma instabilities ...

New material discovery allows study of elusive Weyl fermion ...

New maths to predict dangerous hospital epidemics ...

Kx financial analytics technology tackles Big Data crop research at biotech leader Earlham Institute ...

The Cloud

New hacking technique imperceptibly changes memory virtual servers ...