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Primeur weekly 2011-08-15

Desktop Grids

DistrRTgen added to BOINC project list

Infinispan 5.0 offers more than 45 new features

The Cloud

S&S Worldwide boosts sales by 75 percent with IBM Smarter Commerce software in the Cloud

Citrix extends desktop virtualization leadership with acquisition of RingCube

EuroFlash

Altair announces keynote presenters of 5th European HyperWorks Technology Conference

1st International IRISC Workshop to issue Call for Participation

Nottingham scientists pioneer new method for nanoribbon production

When atoms are surfing on optical waves

The diamond's quantum memory

USFlash

Addonics announces 5-Port HPM-XU port multiplier with eSATA/USB 3.0 connections and a family of RAID tower storage solutions

IBM terminates Blue Waters contract

Steve Scott to leave Cray

SDSC readying 'Gordon' supercomputer for pre-production trials this month

'Data Motion Metric' needed for supercomputer rankings, according to SDSC's Snavely

Platform Computing recognized for second consecutive year at International Business Awards

Supercomputer boosts research power, data support available at WKU facility

GNS Healthcare announces collaboration with Bristol-Myers Squibb

IBM raises bar, records highest ever TPC-C benchmark for x86 servers

Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g delivers record setting performance for 2-processor system on SPECjEnterprise2010 benchmark

Oracle Solaris 11 Express available on Oracle Exadata Database Machines

MOSAID files suit on computer networking patents

Emerson Network Power first to earn EAL2+ Common Criteria certification for secure KVM switch series

Fusion-io to acquire IO Turbine

Caltech-led engineers solve longstanding problem in photonic chip technology

NIST physicists 'entangle' 2 atoms using microwaves for the first time

Designing diamond circuits for extreme environments

Tufts computer engineer wins national award for research

Berkeley Lab researchers develop technique for dynamically controlling plasmonic airy beams

Tufts computer engineer wins national award for research

12 Aug 2011 Medford/Somerville - Efforts to improve how computer programmes manage memory without sacrificing security have earned Sam Guyer, an assistant professor of computer science in the Tufts University School of Engineering, an early career award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). With the $443,000, five-year NSF grant, Sam Guyer will explore a new approach to improving virtual machines - complex pieces of software that manage computing resources such as memory.

Modern managed computer programming languages, such as Java and C#, eliminate many errors and security risks that have plagued traditional languages such as C and C++. But this security comes at a price: programmes written in managed languages are more expensive to run because they require more computing resources.

This creates a dilemma for programmers, Sam Guyer noted. "They can use a safe and secure managed language that requires more memory and server resources or they can continue taking chances with languages such as C and C++."

To solve this problem cost-effectively, Sam Guyer wants to improve the virtual machine by strengthening the process of "garbage collection". The garbage collector identifies what regions of application data are no longer needed by the programme. Then it deletes this data, freeing up vital space for later computations.

But current garbage collection techniques have trouble identifying the trash. "The problem with existing techniques for garbage collection is that they don't know which parts of memory are likely to be garbage, so they have to look at it all", Sam Guyer explained. "It takes a lot of work to identify unused memory - the more data the programme has, the more work it takes."

"If we knew just a little bit more about what the programme's doing, we could probably do a lot better in recycling memory that's not being used", he stated. "And that's where cooperation between programmer and machine comes in."

In Sam Guyer's approach, the programmer will identify the large-scale structures and patterns of use in the programme. "If the garbage collector somehow knows that a block of data represents a particular user, then when the user logs off, it can collect that memory without looking at all the rest of the data", he stated.

For example, in an on-line banking session the server stores a chunk of memory that represents current information at the bank. When a user logs off, the information about that particular session no longer needs to be stored. Conversely, a programme may contain a database that should remain permanent and not be discarded.

Sam Guyer's software will recognize what is to be saved and what should be discarded as garbage. "There are patterns", he stated. "We're developing different tools that will let us look inside the programme and see those kinds of patterns."

"The key idea is that with extra information, virtual machines can provide much more efficient services because they are customized to each application's needs", Sam Guyer stated.
Source: Tufts University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2011-08-15

Desktop Grids

DistrRTgen added to BOINC project list

Infinispan 5.0 offers more than 45 new features

The Cloud

S&S Worldwide boosts sales by 75 percent with IBM Smarter Commerce software in the Cloud

Citrix extends desktop virtualization leadership with acquisition of RingCube

EuroFlash

Altair announces keynote presenters of 5th European HyperWorks Technology Conference

1st International IRISC Workshop to issue Call for Participation

Nottingham scientists pioneer new method for nanoribbon production

When atoms are surfing on optical waves

The diamond's quantum memory

USFlash

Addonics announces 5-Port HPM-XU port multiplier with eSATA/USB 3.0 connections and a family of RAID tower storage solutions

IBM terminates Blue Waters contract

Steve Scott to leave Cray

SDSC readying 'Gordon' supercomputer for pre-production trials this month

'Data Motion Metric' needed for supercomputer rankings, according to SDSC's Snavely

Platform Computing recognized for second consecutive year at International Business Awards

Supercomputer boosts research power, data support available at WKU facility

GNS Healthcare announces collaboration with Bristol-Myers Squibb

IBM raises bar, records highest ever TPC-C benchmark for x86 servers

Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g delivers record setting performance for 2-processor system on SPECjEnterprise2010 benchmark

Oracle Solaris 11 Express available on Oracle Exadata Database Machines

MOSAID files suit on computer networking patents

Emerson Network Power first to earn EAL2+ Common Criteria certification for secure KVM switch series

Fusion-io to acquire IO Turbine

Caltech-led engineers solve longstanding problem in photonic chip technology

NIST physicists 'entangle' 2 atoms using microwaves for the first time

Designing diamond circuits for extreme environments

Tufts computer engineer wins national award for research

Berkeley Lab researchers develop technique for dynamically controlling plasmonic airy beams