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Primeur weekly 2017-07-24

Focus

20th Birthday celebrating OpenMP still welcoming new members ...

Fujitsu's processor roadmap is hitting new targets for Deep Learning ...

Focus on Europe

New FPGA programming method delivers five times more computing power ...

Gazprom Neft to utilise capacity at the St Petersburg Polytechnic University supercomputer ...

Tenfold connectivity increase between Ukraine and European research and education network ...

Newly improved Brain Simulation Platform now online ...

Joeri van Leeuwen received a grant and in-kind expertise from the eScience Center for his astronomy project AA-ALERT ...

Middleware

Bright Computing and Brazil-based AMT sign partnership agreement ...

Hardware

7th International Women in HPC workshop ...

IBM scientists observe elusive gravitational effect in solid-state physics ...

New Supermicro Rack Scale Design (RSD) supports high-density, high-performance pooled NVMe storage ...

Inspur announced the new M5 series servers to get businesses ready for the new era of intelligent computing ...

Women, leadership and Flash - Panel and networking event ...

Applications

3D models help scientists gauge flood impact ...

Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information ...

Flashes of light on the dark matter ...

Titan simulations show importance of close 2-way coupling between human and Earth systems ...

A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser light ...

Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactions ...

Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environment ...

ANSYS, Saudi Aramco and KAUST shatter supercomputing record ...

Scientists use "Piz Daint" simulations to track heavy summer precipitation from the Mediterranean ...

Fernanda Foertter elected SIG HPC Education Vice Chair ...

The Cloud

IBM expands global Cloud data centre presence with four new facilities ...

The Cloud comes to you: AT&T to power self-driving cars, AR/VR and other future 5G applications through edge computing ...

Teradata acquires San Diego-based start-up StackIQ to strengthen Teradata Everywhere and IntelliCloud capabilities ...

IBM mainframe ushers in new era of data protection ...

Solarflare lets server racks match connectivity of a human neuron ...

New high speed interface connects IBM Z to IBM storage systems ...

Oracle significantly expands Cloud at Customer with PaaS and SaaS services to help customers in their journey to the Cloud ...

Joeri van Leeuwen received a grant and in-kind expertise from the eScience Center for his astronomy project AA-ALERT


Joeri van Leeuwen, Dutch astrophysicist, ASTRON and University of Amsterdam. Photography and text: Elodie Burrillon / HUCOPIX.
17 Jul 2017 Amsterdam - Joeri van Leeuwen (42) is a Dutch astrophysicist at ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, and University of Amsterdam. In 2015, Joeri received a grant and in-kind expertise from the eScience Center for his project AA-ALERT, the Access and Acceleration of the Apertif Legacy Exploration of the Radio Transient Sky.

By collaborating with the eScience Center, Joeri van Leeuwen's team aims to make the new and enormous amount of data produced by the rejuvenated Westerbork telescope more open and delivered faster to everyone& - and specifically to contribute to a better understanding of cosmic explosions.

Joeri van Leeuwen stated: "I have always been very curious. As a child, I wanted to understand how animals function, how to make a big fire, how the things in the sky work. I remember liking astronomy when I was 17, but I was also drawn to other sciences. I am just inquisitive and want to know what makes things tick."

"After doing my PhD in astronomy in The Netherlands and spending a few years as a postdoc in Canada and the USA, I came back to The Netherlands ten years ago. I would say that ending up at ASTRON was a result of hard work but also a lot of luck: In my own country, just after finishing two postdocs, they were looking for astronomers to help build a huge radio telescope (LOFAR), with exactly the expertise I had been developing overseas."

"As an astronomer, as in many scientific disciplines, you can focus on the theory, on observations, or on instrumentation. I enjoy that I do all three. Sometimes I work for months on a theory paper, sometimes I get my boots muddy at the LOFAR telescope."

"Our instruments involve a lot of computer science and high-performance computing, so often I am busy with the machines in the telescope server rooms. In addition, there are of course also the months I spend on attracting funding, or on the outreach I do. Plus the mentoring of a sizeable group of students and postdocs. That variety of tasks and skills I enjoy very much."

"I think that the biggest challenge I ever had to overcome was getting ARTS, the real-time system on Apertif, built. The idea behind this project is to rejuvenate the Westerbork Telescope, making it a radio telescope with a 40 times bigger field of view than before, better than any other radio telescope. But the Dutch astronomical community runs many other world-class projects clamoring for resources. So, convincing all stakeholders - funding agencies, astronomers, politicians, technicians - to free up funding and person power took much energy and time. We made the first plans in 2010, and we are building it now."

"I'm proud that ASTRON is the only institute in the world with two of the biggest radio telescopes - LOFAR and the Westerbork Telescope. And we are glueing these together through a real-time GPU supercomputing system."

With Apertif accepted, Joeri van Leeuwen could have been satisfied: there was now a real-time system, and an ERC award for a dedicated team of expert astronomers to help carry out the survey, ALERT. But he had an ambition for the global radio astronomical community: making these new data more open, and delivered faster.

In 2015, Joeri received a grant from the eScience Center for his project AA-ALERT - the Access and Acceleration of the Apertif Legacy Exploration of the Radio Transient Sky. The team has a twofold aim: better access to the data produced by the Westerbork Telescope, and accelerated processing of this data.

"All our data is already open to everyone in principle, but to make it more open to everyone in fact, they need to be easily able to get and use it - using our data shouldn't be reserved to experts."

"This is the first half of the project: making the data more accessible to all. The second half concerns the acceleration of the decision-making. Apertif continuously produces so much data - more than the entire internet of The Netherlands, all the time - that it would be crazy to keep it all. So every second we have to decide 'keep it' or 'throw it away'. So it's a lot like building a new reflex for this telescope, telling it what to do."

"Collaborating with the eScience Center on this AA-ALERT project was, to me, almost obvious. Someone like eScience Research Engineer Alessio Sclocco worked with us on ARTS, at ASTRON, before he got a position at the eScience Center. The GPU acceleration he has been working on, only a handful of people in the country can do it. I actually wanted to hire him myself when he finished his PhD, but the eScience Center got him."

"In the meantime, Jisk Attema makes sure that, after a telescope reflex decision, astronomers can look at the relevant data for our science goals; understanding cosmic explosions. So you can imagine that what I value most about the eScience Center is the high level of expertise. Would I recommend working with the eScience Center? Well, a wholehearted 'yes'."
Source: Netherlands eScience Center

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-07-24

Focus

20th Birthday celebrating OpenMP still welcoming new members ...

Fujitsu's processor roadmap is hitting new targets for Deep Learning ...

Focus on Europe

New FPGA programming method delivers five times more computing power ...

Gazprom Neft to utilise capacity at the St Petersburg Polytechnic University supercomputer ...

Tenfold connectivity increase between Ukraine and European research and education network ...

Newly improved Brain Simulation Platform now online ...

Joeri van Leeuwen received a grant and in-kind expertise from the eScience Center for his astronomy project AA-ALERT ...

Middleware

Bright Computing and Brazil-based AMT sign partnership agreement ...

Hardware

7th International Women in HPC workshop ...

IBM scientists observe elusive gravitational effect in solid-state physics ...

New Supermicro Rack Scale Design (RSD) supports high-density, high-performance pooled NVMe storage ...

Inspur announced the new M5 series servers to get businesses ready for the new era of intelligent computing ...

Women, leadership and Flash - Panel and networking event ...

Applications

3D models help scientists gauge flood impact ...

Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information ...

Flashes of light on the dark matter ...

Titan simulations show importance of close 2-way coupling between human and Earth systems ...

A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser light ...

Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactions ...

Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environment ...

ANSYS, Saudi Aramco and KAUST shatter supercomputing record ...

Scientists use "Piz Daint" simulations to track heavy summer precipitation from the Mediterranean ...

Fernanda Foertter elected SIG HPC Education Vice Chair ...

The Cloud

IBM expands global Cloud data centre presence with four new facilities ...

The Cloud comes to you: AT&T to power self-driving cars, AR/VR and other future 5G applications through edge computing ...

Teradata acquires San Diego-based start-up StackIQ to strengthen Teradata Everywhere and IntelliCloud capabilities ...

IBM mainframe ushers in new era of data protection ...

Solarflare lets server racks match connectivity of a human neuron ...

New high speed interface connects IBM Z to IBM storage systems ...

Oracle significantly expands Cloud at Customer with PaaS and SaaS services to help customers in their journey to the Cloud ...