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Primeur weekly 2017-07-31

Focus

ECMWF at the heart of weather and climate modelling as global challenge of societal relevance with game changing prediction capability through exascale ...

NVIDIA hits the top 10 in the TOP500 and Green500 lists with multi-tasking GPUs - NVIDIA Vice President Ian Buck explains ...

Exascale supercomputing

Oak Ridge National Laboratory acquires D-Wave 2000Q Cloud services to accelerate hybrid computing applications ...

Crowd computing

Dark ecology project will use past weather radar data to trace bird migrations ...

Quantum computing

Tiny dancer atoms could prove a hit with quantum computer scientists ...

Qubitekk licenses ORNL single-photon source approach for quantum encryption ...

Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing ...

University of Sydney and Microsoft forge global quantum computing partnership ...

Focus on Europe

Prof. Jan de Boer joins Board of Directors at Netherlands eScience Center ...

Hardware

Cray to expand storage portfolio through strategic transaction and partnership with Seagate ...

Stampede2 storms out of the Corral in support of U.S. scientists ...

Nick Nystrom appointed Interim Director of PSC ...

CSIRO has chosen Dell EMC to build a new scientific computing capability, kicking off a new generation of research ...

One Stop Systems named one of San Diego's fastest growing companies ...

Applications

High risk of unprecedented rainfall in the United Kingdom simulated by Met Office supercomputer ...

NIH awards $9.3 million for further development of PHENIX structural biology software ...

Inaugural Collaborative Science Call yields six proposals melding genomics and supercomputing ...

Stampede supercomputer skyrocketed science ...

IBM combines All-Flash and storage software optimized for Hortonworks ...

PPPL researchers perform first basic-physics simulation of the impact of recycled atoms on plasma turbulence ...

Catch of the day: A net full of trees ...

Liquid electrolyte contacts for advanced characterization of resistive switching memories ...

Tiny dancer atoms could prove a hit with quantum computer scientists


24 Jul 2017 Guildford - Quantum computers could be a step closer to practical use thanks to the work of an international team led by University of Surrey scientists.

The group, led by Dr. Steve Chick and Professor of Physics Ben Murdin, has developed a way of making phosphorous atoms 'dance', which could be the next breakthrough in the quest to make quantum computers a viable reality.

The study , published inNature Communications, reports that the scientists were successful in manipulating atoms of phosphorous within silicon crystals, controlling their shape and size, essentially making them dance.

To date, the majority of quantum computers have been made using materials that are not mass-produced, and often using atoms suspended in vacuum.

But the Surrey team works with technology where single phosphorous atoms are trapped inside crystals of silicon, which are elements existing computer chips are made from. The team believes that positioning these atoms in a fixed grid structure could pave the way for reliable quantum computers. The strategy, called "surface code" quantum computing, involves placing many atoms in a fixed grid and using the dancing motion of the atoms to control how they interact.

Current generation computers such as those found on desktops use a series of switches called transistors to carry out the key functions of computing - storing information and processing that information.

Quantum computers work by storing and processing that information using atoms, which can be both "off" and "on" at the same time thanks to quantum mechanics. This allows them to process information more efficiently than the computers we have today.

Dr. Steve Chick, who led the research with Professor of Physics Ben Murdin, stated: "Our experiment showed that we can control the shape and size of the phosphorous atoms and make them dance around."

"Our intention is to take advantage of this behaviour to make 'gates', to control when and how the quantum computer works. Our advanced control will help make our quantum computers more reliable, even if they occasionally make mistakes. Classical computers already use ways of recovering from mistakes, but in quantum computers it's a much more difficult problem."

"We also hope that using materials which are already popular in computing will allow quantum computers and current computers to be compatible with each other."

Researchers from Radboud University, The Netherlands; the National Physical Laboratory, UK; University College London, UK; Heriot Watt University, UK; and ETH Zurich, EPF Lausanne and Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland, were involved in the research.
Source: University of Surrey

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-07-31

Focus

ECMWF at the heart of weather and climate modelling as global challenge of societal relevance with game changing prediction capability through exascale ...

NVIDIA hits the top 10 in the TOP500 and Green500 lists with multi-tasking GPUs - NVIDIA Vice President Ian Buck explains ...

Exascale supercomputing

Oak Ridge National Laboratory acquires D-Wave 2000Q Cloud services to accelerate hybrid computing applications ...

Crowd computing

Dark ecology project will use past weather radar data to trace bird migrations ...

Quantum computing

Tiny dancer atoms could prove a hit with quantum computer scientists ...

Qubitekk licenses ORNL single-photon source approach for quantum encryption ...

Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing ...

University of Sydney and Microsoft forge global quantum computing partnership ...

Focus on Europe

Prof. Jan de Boer joins Board of Directors at Netherlands eScience Center ...

Hardware

Cray to expand storage portfolio through strategic transaction and partnership with Seagate ...

Stampede2 storms out of the Corral in support of U.S. scientists ...

Nick Nystrom appointed Interim Director of PSC ...

CSIRO has chosen Dell EMC to build a new scientific computing capability, kicking off a new generation of research ...

One Stop Systems named one of San Diego's fastest growing companies ...

Applications

High risk of unprecedented rainfall in the United Kingdom simulated by Met Office supercomputer ...

NIH awards $9.3 million for further development of PHENIX structural biology software ...

Inaugural Collaborative Science Call yields six proposals melding genomics and supercomputing ...

Stampede supercomputer skyrocketed science ...

IBM combines All-Flash and storage software optimized for Hortonworks ...

PPPL researchers perform first basic-physics simulation of the impact of recycled atoms on plasma turbulence ...

Catch of the day: A net full of trees ...

Liquid electrolyte contacts for advanced characterization of resistive switching memories ...