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Primeur weekly 2017-07-24

Focus

20th Birthday celebrating OpenMP still welcoming new members ...

Fujitsu's processor roadmap is hitting new targets for Deep Learning ...

Focus on Europe

New FPGA programming method delivers five times more computing power ...

Gazprom Neft to utilise capacity at the St Petersburg Polytechnic University supercomputer ...

Tenfold connectivity increase between Ukraine and European research and education network ...

Newly improved Brain Simulation Platform now online ...

Joeri van Leeuwen received a grant and in-kind expertise from the eScience Center for his astronomy project AA-ALERT ...

Middleware

Bright Computing and Brazil-based AMT sign partnership agreement ...

Hardware

7th International Women in HPC workshop ...

IBM scientists observe elusive gravitational effect in solid-state physics ...

New Supermicro Rack Scale Design (RSD) supports high-density, high-performance pooled NVMe storage ...

Inspur announced the new M5 series servers to get businesses ready for the new era of intelligent computing ...

Women, leadership and Flash - Panel and networking event ...

Applications

3D models help scientists gauge flood impact ...

Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information ...

Flashes of light on the dark matter ...

Titan simulations show importance of close 2-way coupling between human and Earth systems ...

A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser light ...

Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactions ...

Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environment ...

ANSYS, Saudi Aramco and KAUST shatter supercomputing record ...

Scientists use "Piz Daint" simulations to track heavy summer precipitation from the Mediterranean ...

Fernanda Foertter elected SIG HPC Education Vice Chair ...

The Cloud

IBM expands global Cloud data centre presence with four new facilities ...

The Cloud comes to you: AT&T to power self-driving cars, AR/VR and other future 5G applications through edge computing ...

Teradata acquires San Diego-based start-up StackIQ to strengthen Teradata Everywhere and IntelliCloud capabilities ...

IBM mainframe ushers in new era of data protection ...

Solarflare lets server racks match connectivity of a human neuron ...

New high speed interface connects IBM Z to IBM storage systems ...

Oracle significantly expands Cloud at Customer with PaaS and SaaS services to help customers in their journey to the Cloud ...

3D models help scientists gauge flood impact


Pictured here is the Coralville Dam on the Coralville Lake overflowing into its spillway during the Iowa Flood of 2008. The flood cost $10 billion in damages for the entire state of Iowa, due to the overflowing of the Iowa and Cedar Rivers. After the flood, the Iowa Flood Center at the University of Iowa was established for flood-related research. Credit: United States Army Corps of Engineers.
18 Jul 2017 Oak Ridge - Heavy rainfall can cause rivers and drainage systems to overflow or dams to break, leading to flood events that bring damage to property and road systems as well potential loss of human life. One such event in 2008 cost $10 billion in damages for the entire state of Iowa. After the flood, the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) at the University of Iowa (UI) was established as the first centre in the United States for advanced flood-related research and education.

Today, simplified 2D flood models are the state of the art for predicting flood wave propagation, or how floods spread across land. A team at IFC, led by UI Professor George Constantinescu, is creating 3D non-hydrostatic flood models that can more accurately simulate flood wave propagation and account for the interaction between the flood wave and large obstacles such as dams or floodplain walls. These 3D models also can be used to assess and improve the predictive capabilities of the 2D models that government agencies and consulting companies use for predicting how floods will spread and the associated risks and hazards.

Using one of the world's most powerful supercomputers - Titan, the 27-petaflop Cray XK7 at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) - George Constantinescu's team performed one of the first highly resolved, 3D, volume-of-fluid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a dam break in a natural environment. The simulation allowed the team to map precise water levels for actual flood events over time. RANS is a widely used method for modelling turbulent flows.

"Flood events, like those generated by dam breaks, can be computationally very expensive to simulate", George Constantinescu stated. "Previously, there wasn't enough computer power to do these kinds of time-accurate simulations in large computational domains, but with the power of high-performance computing (HPC) and Titan, we are achieving more than was previously thought possible."

The project was supported in 2015 and 2016 within the OLCF's Director's Discretionary user programme. The OLCF, a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides HPC resources for research and development projects to advance scientific discovery.

The team's 3D simulations showed that commonly used 2D models may inaccurately predict some aspects of flooding, such as the time over which dangerous flood levels last at certain locations and the amount of surface area flooded. Simulation results also demonstrated that 2D models may underestimate the speed at which floods spread and overestimate the time at which flood waves reach their highest point.

When the water sources that empty into a river rise simultaneously, they can trigger one or more successive flood waves. Accuracy of the 1D, 2D, or 3D flood models that track how these waves move is crucial for predicting maximum flood depth, hazardous conditions, and other variables.

"We need to know what's going to happen for situations in which a dam breaks", George Constantinescu stated. "We need to know who's going to be affected, how much time they will have to evacuate, and what else might happen to the environment as a result."

Because 2D models make simplified assumptions about some aspects of the flow, they can't account for changes in the flow, such as when the flood wave moves around large obstacles, changes rapidly in direction, or fully immerses bridge decks. The team needed a leadership-class supercomputer to run the 3D simulations and accurately capture these changes.

Using a fully non-hydrostatic 3D RANS solver, the team performed the first simulations of the hypothetical failure of two Iowa dams: the Coralville Dam in Iowa City and the Saylorville Dam in Des Moines. Each used a computational grid of about 30-50 million cells and covered a physical area of about 20 miles by 5 miles.

The team used the state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics software STAR-CCM+. This software features a volume-of-fluid method to track the position of the water's free surface - the areas where water meets the air. In a scalability study, the team determined the peak performance of the code for the dam break simulations. The researchers used 2,500 of Titan's CPU processors for peak performance in each simulation.

The researchers also computed the same dam break test cases using a standard 2D model commonly used by IFC. When they compared the 2D results against those of the 3D simulations, they found that the 2D model underestimated how quickly the flood wave moved across land and overestimated the time at which the maximum flood occurred. This finding is important because government agencies and consulting companies use 2D shallow flow models to predict dam breaks and floods, as well as to estimate flood hazards.

"By performing these 3D simulations, we provided a huge data set that can be used to improve the accuracy of existing 2D and 1D flood models", George Constantinescu stated. "We can also examine the effectiveness of deploying flood protection structures for different flooding scenarios." The team ultimately showed that HPC can be used successfully to answer engineering questions related to the consequences of structural failure of dams and related hazards.

George Constantinescu said that as computers become faster and more powerful, simulations of full flooding events over larger physical regions will be possible. Summit, the OLCF's next-generation supercomputer that is scheduled to come online in 2018, will unearth new possibilities for George Constantinescu's research.

"Advances in numerical algorithms, automatic grid generation, and increased supercomputer power will eventually make the simulations of flood waves over large durations of time possible using Titan, and even more so with Summit", George Constantinescu stated. "Eventually, things we previously had to do by hand, such as generating a high-quality computational grid, will just be part of the typical software package."

The George Constantinescu team collaborated on this research with Professor Witold Krajewski, director of IFC and research engineer at the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research (IIHR)-Hydroscience and Engineering. IIHR PhD student Daniel Horna-Munoz, whose research was sponsored by IFC, was tasked with developing and testing the 3D model, running the simulations, and analyzing the data.
Source: DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-07-24

Focus

20th Birthday celebrating OpenMP still welcoming new members ...

Fujitsu's processor roadmap is hitting new targets for Deep Learning ...

Focus on Europe

New FPGA programming method delivers five times more computing power ...

Gazprom Neft to utilise capacity at the St Petersburg Polytechnic University supercomputer ...

Tenfold connectivity increase between Ukraine and European research and education network ...

Newly improved Brain Simulation Platform now online ...

Joeri van Leeuwen received a grant and in-kind expertise from the eScience Center for his astronomy project AA-ALERT ...

Middleware

Bright Computing and Brazil-based AMT sign partnership agreement ...

Hardware

7th International Women in HPC workshop ...

IBM scientists observe elusive gravitational effect in solid-state physics ...

New Supermicro Rack Scale Design (RSD) supports high-density, high-performance pooled NVMe storage ...

Inspur announced the new M5 series servers to get businesses ready for the new era of intelligent computing ...

Women, leadership and Flash - Panel and networking event ...

Applications

3D models help scientists gauge flood impact ...

Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information ...

Flashes of light on the dark matter ...

Titan simulations show importance of close 2-way coupling between human and Earth systems ...

A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser light ...

Simulation reveals universal signature of chaos in ultracold reactions ...

Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environment ...

ANSYS, Saudi Aramco and KAUST shatter supercomputing record ...

Scientists use "Piz Daint" simulations to track heavy summer precipitation from the Mediterranean ...

Fernanda Foertter elected SIG HPC Education Vice Chair ...

The Cloud

IBM expands global Cloud data centre presence with four new facilities ...

The Cloud comes to you: AT&T to power self-driving cars, AR/VR and other future 5G applications through edge computing ...

Teradata acquires San Diego-based start-up StackIQ to strengthen Teradata Everywhere and IntelliCloud capabilities ...

IBM mainframe ushers in new era of data protection ...

Solarflare lets server racks match connectivity of a human neuron ...

New high speed interface connects IBM Z to IBM storage systems ...

Oracle significantly expands Cloud at Customer with PaaS and SaaS services to help customers in their journey to the Cloud ...