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Primeur weekly 2016-07-18

Special

SoftBank Group to acquire ARM for about 29 billion euro (24 billion GBP) ...

Focus

Moore's Law is all about economics but there are alternative technologies on the way ...

CMOS is still here to stay but we need to think out of the box to reclaim efficiency ...

Why the hunt for killer applications to run on quantum computers is challenging ...

Quantum computing

Researchers at UCSB blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement ...

Soprano and quantum computer combine for world first performance ...

Focus on Europe

New data centre Amsterdam Science Park for SURFsara supercomputers is completed ...

Middleware

Mellanox simplifies RDMA deployments with enhanced RoCE software ...

Hardware

Researchers devise secure, efficient anonymity network ...

Berkeley Lab scientists grow atomically thin transistors and circuits ...

Final expansion stage of the high-performance computer at DKRZ starts operation ...

Huaxintong Semiconductor licenses ARMv8-A architecture ...

SiFive introduces industry's first open-source chip platforms ...

AMAX launches GPU solutions based on latest NVIDIA Tesla P100 GPU accelerators ...

Applications

Netherlands eScience Center initiates three new Path-Finding projects ...

Physicists couple distant nuclear spins using a single electron ...

Supercomputers fire lasers to shoot gamma ray beam ...

Physics researchers question calcium-52's magic ...

Jack Wells brings HPC expertise to seismology meeting ...

Bridges connects evolutionary biologists with genomes of wild species ...

The Cloud

IBM Cloud ranked second in worldwide Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) ...

Physicists couple distant nuclear spins using a single electron

11 Jul 2016 Basel - For the first time, researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have coupled the nuclear spins of distant atoms using just a single electron. Three research groups took part in this complex experiment, the results of which have now been published in the journalNature Nanotechnology.

In most materials, the nuclear spins of neighbouring atoms have only a very weak effect on one another, as the tiny nuclei are located deep within the atoms. This is not the case in metals, however, where some of the electrons are able to move freely. The electron spins are able to couple nuclear spins at relatively large distances from one another. Named after four physicists, this RKKY interaction was discovered in the 1950s.

Now, an experiment by researchers from the Department of Physics at the University of Basel has for the first time succeeded in demonstrating this mechanism with a single electron, describing it using quantum theory. The team led by Professor Richard Warburton trapped a single electron inside a quantum dot. With use of a method developed in Basel to measure nuclear spin resonance, they showed that the electron coupled the spins of nuclei up to five nanometers apart - a huge distance in the world of nuclear spins. The results are particularly relevant to the development of spin qubits: these seek to use electron spins to carry information, but the interaction with the nuclei limits the stability of the quantum information.

"This is probably the most complicated experiment our team has ever carried out", stated Professor Richard Warburton, leader of the nano-photonics research group at the Department of Physics in Basel. At the same time, he expressed his delight at the cooperation between the three research groups that made this experiment possible. "There were so many different aspects to take into account - a challenge we were able to master only thanks to the fantastic collaborations in our department."

The research group led by Professor Martino Poggio provided the expertise in the field of nuclear spin resonance, while the team led by Professor Daniel Loss spent months computing the quantum theory for the experiment. A vital contribution also came from Ruhr University Bochum, which manufactured the semiconductor chips for the experiment.
Source: University of Basel

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2016-07-18

Special

SoftBank Group to acquire ARM for about 29 billion euro (24 billion GBP) ...

Focus

Moore's Law is all about economics but there are alternative technologies on the way ...

CMOS is still here to stay but we need to think out of the box to reclaim efficiency ...

Why the hunt for killer applications to run on quantum computers is challenging ...

Quantum computing

Researchers at UCSB blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement ...

Soprano and quantum computer combine for world first performance ...

Focus on Europe

New data centre Amsterdam Science Park for SURFsara supercomputers is completed ...

Middleware

Mellanox simplifies RDMA deployments with enhanced RoCE software ...

Hardware

Researchers devise secure, efficient anonymity network ...

Berkeley Lab scientists grow atomically thin transistors and circuits ...

Final expansion stage of the high-performance computer at DKRZ starts operation ...

Huaxintong Semiconductor licenses ARMv8-A architecture ...

SiFive introduces industry's first open-source chip platforms ...

AMAX launches GPU solutions based on latest NVIDIA Tesla P100 GPU accelerators ...

Applications

Netherlands eScience Center initiates three new Path-Finding projects ...

Physicists couple distant nuclear spins using a single electron ...

Supercomputers fire lasers to shoot gamma ray beam ...

Physics researchers question calcium-52's magic ...

Jack Wells brings HPC expertise to seismology meeting ...

Bridges connects evolutionary biologists with genomes of wild species ...

The Cloud

IBM Cloud ranked second in worldwide Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) ...