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Primeur weekly 2011-05-16

EuroFlash

Jülich makes a crutial step towards Exascale computer with the introduction of hybrid clusters using Tesla 20-series GPU's ...

Cray signs contract to upgrade and expand the Cray XE6 supercomputer at the University of Edinburgh ...

Cray reports first quarter 2011 financial results ...

Electromechanics also operates at the nanoscale ...

ICM selects IBM to fuel national science ...

USFlash

Carbon, carbon, everywhere; But not from the Big Bang ...

Cisco Networking Solutions increase security and mobility with Cloud services for branch offices ...

Xerox and Cisco to form alliance to deliver Cloud services; Combine network intelligence and print management ...

Cray and Sandia establish a Supercomputing Institute for Learning and Knowledge Systems ...

EMC Isilon delivers world's largest single file system for big data ...

EMC and Box deliver enterprise content management mobility through the Cloud ...

EMC enables service providers to accelerate customers' journey to Cloud computing ...

EMC delivers "Cloud to Ground" root-cause analysis for data centres ...

EMC delivers Hadoop 'big data' analytics to the enterprise ...

New EMC Ionix UIM software simplifies Cloud infrastructure management ...

EMC connects VNX to the Cloud with new Cloud Tiering Appliance ...

Graphene optical modulators could lead to ultrafast communications ...

HP puts data storage on a diet and guarantees capacity reduction ...

HP launches high-performance FlexNetwork solutions for video and mobile computing ...

HP readies enterprises for the future with FlexNetwork architecture ...

IBM delivers technology to help clients protect and retain "Big Data" ...

Primerica selects new IBM zEnterprise mainframe server for smarter infrastructure ...

Proton dripping tests a fundamental force in nature ...

Raritan's data centre energy management software gets a new dashboard with forecasting tools and gauges to track and visualize key energy metrics ...

Red Hat revolutionizes the private and hybrid Cloud market ...

Rice doubles supercomputing capacity ...

Student, 16, invents new drug cocktail to fight cystic fibrosis, wins Canadian biotech challenge ...

Carbon, carbon, everywhere; But not from the Big Bang

11 May 2011 Raleigh - As Star Trek is so fond of reminding us, we're carbon-based life forms. But the event that jump-started the universe, the Big Bang, didn't actually produce any carbon, so where the heck did it - and we - come from? An North Carolina (NC) State researcher has helped create supercomputer simulations that demonstrate how carbon is produced in stars, proving an old theory correct.

More than 50 years ago, an astronomer named Fred Hoyle deduced that when three helium nuclei - or alpha particles - come together inside the core of a star, they have difficulty combining to form carbon-12, the stuff we're made of. So he predicted a new state of carbon-12, one with an energy tuned just right to make the formation of carbon possible in stars. This new state is now known as the Hoyle state. Later experimentation demonstrated that the theory was correct, but no one had ever been able to reproduce the Hoyle state from scratch, starting from the known interactions of protons and neutrons. If the Hoyle state didn't show up in those calculations, then the calculations must be incorrect or incomplete.

NC State physicist Dean Lee, along with German colleagues Evgeny Epelbaum, Hermann Krebs, and Ulf-G. Meissner, had previously developed a new method for describing all the possible ways that protons and neutrons can bind with one another inside nuclei. This "effective field theory" is formulated on a complex numerical lattice that allows the researchers to run simulations that show how particles interact. When the researchers put six protons and six neutrons on the lattice, the Hoyle state appeared together with other observed states of carbon-12, proving the theory correct from first principles.

"We've had simple models of the Hoyle state using three alpha particles for a long time, but the first principles calculations weren't giving anything close", Dean Lee stated. "Our method places the particles into a simulation with certain space and time parameters, then allows them to do what they want to do. Within those simulations, the Hoyle state shows up."

Their research "Ab initio calculation of the Hoyle state" appears in the May 13 issue ofPhysical Review Letters. The authors are Dean Lee, North Carolina State University; Evgeny Epelbaum and Hermann Krebs, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany; Ulf-G. Meissner, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn, Germany.

Dean Lee added: "This work is valuable because it gives us a much better idea of the kind of 'fine-tuning' nature has to do in order to produce carbon in stars."

The abstract of the article is as follows: "The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars heavier than our sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at −85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy."

The Department of Physics is part of NC State's College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences.
Source: North Carolina State University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2011-05-16

EuroFlash

Jülich makes a crutial step towards Exascale computer with the introduction of hybrid clusters using Tesla 20-series GPU's ...

Cray signs contract to upgrade and expand the Cray XE6 supercomputer at the University of Edinburgh ...

Cray reports first quarter 2011 financial results ...

Electromechanics also operates at the nanoscale ...

ICM selects IBM to fuel national science ...

USFlash

Carbon, carbon, everywhere; But not from the Big Bang ...

Cisco Networking Solutions increase security and mobility with Cloud services for branch offices ...

Xerox and Cisco to form alliance to deliver Cloud services; Combine network intelligence and print management ...

Cray and Sandia establish a Supercomputing Institute for Learning and Knowledge Systems ...

EMC Isilon delivers world's largest single file system for big data ...

EMC and Box deliver enterprise content management mobility through the Cloud ...

EMC enables service providers to accelerate customers' journey to Cloud computing ...

EMC delivers "Cloud to Ground" root-cause analysis for data centres ...

EMC delivers Hadoop 'big data' analytics to the enterprise ...

New EMC Ionix UIM software simplifies Cloud infrastructure management ...

EMC connects VNX to the Cloud with new Cloud Tiering Appliance ...

Graphene optical modulators could lead to ultrafast communications ...

HP puts data storage on a diet and guarantees capacity reduction ...

HP launches high-performance FlexNetwork solutions for video and mobile computing ...

HP readies enterprises for the future with FlexNetwork architecture ...

IBM delivers technology to help clients protect and retain "Big Data" ...

Primerica selects new IBM zEnterprise mainframe server for smarter infrastructure ...

Proton dripping tests a fundamental force in nature ...

Raritan's data centre energy management software gets a new dashboard with forecasting tools and gauges to track and visualize key energy metrics ...

Red Hat revolutionizes the private and hybrid Cloud market ...

Rice doubles supercomputing capacity ...

Student, 16, invents new drug cocktail to fight cystic fibrosis, wins Canadian biotech challenge ...