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Primeur weekly 2019-04-29

Quantum computing

Leading universities partner with IBM to accelerate joint research and drive educational opportunities in quantum computing ...

Canada's Strategic Innovation Fund invests CAN$7,2 million in ISARA ...

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing ...

Building a Printing Press for New Quantum Materials ...

New robust device may scale up quantum tech, according to researchers ...

Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists ...

Munich quantum distillery for light ...

Focus on Europe

PRACE issues Annual Report 2018 in a new style ...

Middleware

Sylabs announces general availability of SingularityPRO 3.1 ...

Hardware

Calcul Québec inaugurates a cutting-edge supercomputer to boost research performance ...

Xilinx to acquire Solarflare ...

New Supermicro scale-up in-memory computing platforms now shipping in volume ...

Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications ...

Applications

Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation ...

UC San Diego's HPWREN Workshop attracts first responders, scientists and educators ...

Illinois researchers sweeten "honeypot" to catch, blacklist hackers ...

Four Ph.D. students selected as Blue Waters Graduate Fellows ...

ALCF Data Science Programme seeks proposals for data and learning projects ...

A new PIC simulation tool brings advanced scalability to ultra-high-intensity physics simulations ...

Upgraded science trailer teaches students about supercomputing ...

OLCF scientist talks early Summit results at APS Meeting ...

The Cloud

Archanan announces beta launch of the Archanan Development Cloud, a Cloud-based developer platform for building and testing code at scale ...

Inspur and Nutanix partner for Inspur HCI all-in-one system inMerge1000 ...

Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists


The research team: Camille Papon, Leonardo Midolo and Xiaoyan Zhou from the Niels Bohr Institute. Photo: Ola J. Joensen.
23 Apr 2019 Copenhagen - University of Copenhagen researchers have developed a nanocomponent that emits light particles carrying quantum information. Less than one-tenth the width of a human hair, the miniscule component makes it possible to scale up and could ultimately reach the capabilities required for a quantum computer or quantum internet. The research result puts Denmark at the head of the pack in the quantum race.
The research team has invented a component, called a nanomechanical router, that emits quantum information carried by light particles (photons) and routes them into different directions inside a photonic chip. Photonic chips are like computer microchips - only, they use light instead of electrons. The component merges nano-opto-mechanics and quantum photonics - two areas of research that, until now, have never been combined. Photo: Ola J. Joensen.

Teams around the world are working to develop quantum technologies. The focus of researchers based at the Center for Hybrid Quantum Networks (Hy-Q) at the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute is on developing quantum communication technology based on light circuits, known as nanophotonic circuits. The UCPH researchers have now achieved a major advancement.

"It is a truly major result, despite the component being so tiny", stated Assistant Professor Leonardo Midolo, who has been working towards this breakthrough for the past five years.

The research team has invented a component, called a nanomechanical router, that emits quantum information carried by light particles (photons) and routes them into different directions inside a photonic chip. Photonic chips are like computer microchips - only, they use light instead of electrons. The component merges nano-opto-mechanics and quantum photonics - two areas of research that, until now, have never been combined. Most spectacular of all, is the size of the component, just a tenth that of a human hair. It is this microscopic size that makes it so promising for future applications.

"Bringing the worlds of nanomechanics and quantum photonics together is a way to scale up quantum technology. In quantum physics, it has been a challenge to scale systems. Until now, we have been able to send off individual photons. However, to do more advanced things with quantum physics, we will need to scale systems up, which is what this invention allows for. To build a quantum computer or quantum internet, you don't just need one photon at a time, you need lots of photons simultaneously that you can connect to each another", explained Leonardo Midolo.

To exploit quantum mechanical laws to e.g., to build a quantum computer or a quantum internet, many nanomechanical routers must be integrated in the same chip. About 50 photons are required to have enough power for achieving what is known as "quantum supremacy". According to Leonardo Midolo, the new nanomechanical router makes doing so a realistic goal.

"We have calculated that our nanomechanical router can already be scaled up to ten photons, and with further enhancements, it should be able to achieve the 50 photons needed to reach 'quantum supremacy'."

The invention is also a major leap forward in controlling light in a chip. Existing technology allows for only a few routers to be integrated on a single chip due to the large device footprint. Nanomechanical routers, on the contrary, are so small that several thousand can be integrated in the same chip.

"Our component is extremely efficient. It is all about being able to emit as many photons at once, without losing any of them. No other current technique allows for this", stated Leonardo Midolo.

The research is carried out in the Quantum Photonics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute, which is a part of the newly established Center for Hybrid Quantum Networks (Hy-Q).

The research is funded by Innovationsfonden; Villum Fonden; Danmarks Grundforskningsfond; H2020 European research Concil; Teknologi og Produktion, Det Frie Forskningsråd; Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; and Styrelsen for Forskning og Innovation. The result is published in Optica .
Source: University of Copenhagen

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-04-29

Quantum computing

Leading universities partner with IBM to accelerate joint research and drive educational opportunities in quantum computing ...

Canada's Strategic Innovation Fund invests CAN$7,2 million in ISARA ...

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing ...

Building a Printing Press for New Quantum Materials ...

New robust device may scale up quantum tech, according to researchers ...

Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists ...

Munich quantum distillery for light ...

Focus on Europe

PRACE issues Annual Report 2018 in a new style ...

Middleware

Sylabs announces general availability of SingularityPRO 3.1 ...

Hardware

Calcul Québec inaugurates a cutting-edge supercomputer to boost research performance ...

Xilinx to acquire Solarflare ...

New Supermicro scale-up in-memory computing platforms now shipping in volume ...

Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications ...

Applications

Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation ...

UC San Diego's HPWREN Workshop attracts first responders, scientists and educators ...

Illinois researchers sweeten "honeypot" to catch, blacklist hackers ...

Four Ph.D. students selected as Blue Waters Graduate Fellows ...

ALCF Data Science Programme seeks proposals for data and learning projects ...

A new PIC simulation tool brings advanced scalability to ultra-high-intensity physics simulations ...

Upgraded science trailer teaches students about supercomputing ...

OLCF scientist talks early Summit results at APS Meeting ...

The Cloud

Archanan announces beta launch of the Archanan Development Cloud, a Cloud-based developer platform for building and testing code at scale ...

Inspur and Nutanix partner for Inspur HCI all-in-one system inMerge1000 ...