Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-04-29

Quantum computing

Leading universities partner with IBM to accelerate joint research and drive educational opportunities in quantum computing ...

Canada's Strategic Innovation Fund invests CAN$7,2 million in ISARA ...

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing ...

Building a Printing Press for New Quantum Materials ...

New robust device may scale up quantum tech, according to researchers ...

Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists ...

Munich quantum distillery for light ...

Focus on Europe

PRACE issues Annual Report 2018 in a new style ...

Middleware

Sylabs announces general availability of SingularityPRO 3.1 ...

Hardware

Calcul Québec inaugurates a cutting-edge supercomputer to boost research performance ...

Xilinx to acquire Solarflare ...

New Supermicro scale-up in-memory computing platforms now shipping in volume ...

Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications ...

Applications

Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation ...

UC San Diego's HPWREN Workshop attracts first responders, scientists and educators ...

Illinois researchers sweeten "honeypot" to catch, blacklist hackers ...

Four Ph.D. students selected as Blue Waters Graduate Fellows ...

ALCF Data Science Programme seeks proposals for data and learning projects ...

A new PIC simulation tool brings advanced scalability to ultra-high-intensity physics simulations ...

Upgraded science trailer teaches students about supercomputing ...

OLCF scientist talks early Summit results at APS Meeting ...

The Cloud

Archanan announces beta launch of the Archanan Development Cloud, a Cloud-based developer platform for building and testing code at scale ...

Inspur and Nutanix partner for Inspur HCI all-in-one system inMerge1000 ...

New robust device may scale up quantum tech, according to researchers


Researchers at various Microsoft Quantum lab sites, including the lab of Michael Manfra at Purdue University, collaborated to create a device that could bring more scalable quantum bits. Pictured here are Purdue researchers Candice Thomas (left) and Geoff Gardner. Credit: Microsoft Station Q Purdue.
24 Apr 2019 West Lafayette - Researchers have been trying for many years to build a quantum computer that industry could scale up, but the building blocks of quantum computing, qubits, still aren't robust enough to handle the noisy environment of what would be a quantum computer.

A theory developed only two years ago proposed a way to make qubits more resilient through combining a semiconductor, indium arsenide, with a superconductor, aluminum, into a planar device. Now, this theory has received experimental support in a device that could also aid the scaling of qubits.

This semiconductor-superconductor combination creates a state of "topological superconductivity", which would protect against even slight changes in a qubit's environment that interfere with its quantum nature, a renowned problem called "decoherence".

The device is potentially scalable because of its flat "planar" surface - a platform that industry already uses in the form of silicon wafers for building classical microprocessors.

The work, published in Nature , was led by the Microsoft Quantum lab at the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute, which fabricated and measured the device. The Microsoft Quantum lab at Purdue University grew the semiconductor-superconductor heterostructure using a technique called molecular beam epitaxy, and performed initial characterization measurements.

Theorists from Station Q, a Microsoft Research lab in Santa Barbara, California, along with the University of Chicago and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, also participated in the study.

"Because planar semiconductor device technology has been so successful in classical hardware, several approaches for scaling up a quantum computer having been building on it", stated Michael Manfra, Purdue University's Bill and Dee O'Brien Chair Professor of Physics and Astronomy, and professor of electrical and computer engineering and materials engineering, who leads Purdue's Microsoft Station Q site.

These experiments provide evidence that aluminum and indium arsenide, when brought together to form a device called a Josephson junction, can support Majorana zero modes, which scientists have predicted possess topological protection against decoherence.

It's also been known that aluminum and indium arsenide work well together because a supercurrent flows well between them.

This is because unlike most semiconductors, indium arsenide doesn't have a barrier that prevents the electrons of one material from entering another material. This way, the superconductivity of aluminum can make the top layers of indium arsenide, a semiconductor, superconducting, as well.

"The device isn't operating as a qubit yet, but this paper shows that it has the right ingredients to be a scalable technology", stated Michael Manfra, whose lab specializes in building platforms for, and understanding the physics of, upcoming quantum technologies.

Combining the best properties of superconductors and semiconductors into planar structures, which industry could readily adapt, could lead to making quantum technology scalable. Trillions of switches, called transistors, on a single wafer currently allow classical computers to process information.

"This work is an encouraging first step towards building scalable quantum technologies", Michael Manfra stated.

Work at Purdue was financially supported by Microsoft Corp.
Source: Purdue University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-04-29

Quantum computing

Leading universities partner with IBM to accelerate joint research and drive educational opportunities in quantum computing ...

Canada's Strategic Innovation Fund invests CAN$7,2 million in ISARA ...

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing ...

Building a Printing Press for New Quantum Materials ...

New robust device may scale up quantum tech, according to researchers ...

Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists ...

Munich quantum distillery for light ...

Focus on Europe

PRACE issues Annual Report 2018 in a new style ...

Middleware

Sylabs announces general availability of SingularityPRO 3.1 ...

Hardware

Calcul Québec inaugurates a cutting-edge supercomputer to boost research performance ...

Xilinx to acquire Solarflare ...

New Supermicro scale-up in-memory computing platforms now shipping in volume ...

Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications ...

Applications

Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation ...

UC San Diego's HPWREN Workshop attracts first responders, scientists and educators ...

Illinois researchers sweeten "honeypot" to catch, blacklist hackers ...

Four Ph.D. students selected as Blue Waters Graduate Fellows ...

ALCF Data Science Programme seeks proposals for data and learning projects ...

A new PIC simulation tool brings advanced scalability to ultra-high-intensity physics simulations ...

Upgraded science trailer teaches students about supercomputing ...

OLCF scientist talks early Summit results at APS Meeting ...

The Cloud

Archanan announces beta launch of the Archanan Development Cloud, a Cloud-based developer platform for building and testing code at scale ...

Inspur and Nutanix partner for Inspur HCI all-in-one system inMerge1000 ...