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Primeur weekly 2018-04-16

Focus

GO FAIR initiative to create implementation networks for stewardship of data ...

Quantum computing

Atos Quantum Learning Machine can now simulate real qubits ...

UCSB/Google researchers in quantum computing professor John Martinis' group outline their plan for quantum supremacy ...

New qubit now works without breaks ...

Prototype of most advanced quantum memory presented by two Kazan universities ...

The thermodynamics of computing ...

Focus on Europe

GÉANT confirms Erik Huizer as CEO ...

ISC launches Travel Grant Programme to enable students and young researchers to attend the conference ...

Student develops gaming technology for environmental and scientific research ...

Prof. Dr. Xiaoxiang Zhu wins the 2018 PRACE Ada Lovelace Award for HPC ...

Academia and industry collaborate to drive UK supercomputer adoption ...

Middleware

Queen Mary University of London HPC cluster performance increases several orders of magnitude, saving time and cost ...

Hardware

University of Texas hires next director of no. 1 ranked computational institute ...

James Ang joins Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as chief scientist for computing ...

Fujitsu commences sales of PRIMERGY x86 server aimed at data centre companies ...

Tohoku University deploys vSMP Foundation for "The Supercomputer System" ...

Chinese leading weather research institute selected Mellanox InfiniBand, replacing OmniPath in an existing data centre ...

Valleytronics discovery could extend limits of Moore's Law ...

Top HPC clusters and workstations for AI, ML developed by Nor-Tech ...

Demonstration of world record: 159 Tb/s transmission over 1,045 km with 3-mode fiber ...

Applications

Boston partners with Excelero and Pixit Media at NAB to demo joint solution for media workflows ...

Fujitsu launches "Heart Explorer" to study heart behaviour ...

U.S. Department of Energy supports doctoral research into on-site analysis of supercomputer simulations ...

Scientists use machine learning to speed discovery of metallic glass ...

Machine learning could help search for gravitational waves ...

Artificial Intelligence can now detect gravitational waves ...

Jon Bashor retires after 27 years of service to national labs ...

Research and software: perspectives from different communities ...

The background hum of space could reveal hidden black holes ...

How to catch a fish genome with Big Data ...

Translational research community debates on the EGA and its impact on health ...

The Cloud

Capitalizing on the opportunity of hybrid cloud in HPC ...

St. Jude Cloud launches for researchers worldwide ...

The background hum of space could reveal hidden black holes

12 Apr 2018 Melbourne - Deep space is not as silent as we have been led to believe. Every few minutes a pair of black holes smash into each other. These cataclysms release ripples in the fabric of spacetime known as gravitational waves. Now Monash University scientists have developed a way to listen in on these events. The new technique is expected to reveal the presence of thousands of previously hidden black holes.

Last year, in one of the biggest astronomical discoveries of the 21st century, LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) and Virgo Collaboration researchers measured gravitational waves from a pair of merging neutron stars.

Drs. Eric Thrane and Rory Smith, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) and Monash University, were part of the team involved in last year's discovery and were also part of the team involved in the detection of first gravitational-wave discovery in 2015, when ripples in the fabric of space time generated by the collision of two black holes in the distant Universe were first witnessed, confirming Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity.

To date, there have been six confirmed, or gold plated, gravitational-wave events announced by the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations. However there are, according to Dr. Thrane, more than 100,000 gravitational wave events every year too faint for LIGO and Virgo to unambiguously detect. The gravitational waves from these mergers combine to create a gravitational-wave background. While the individual events that contribute to it cannot be resolved individually, researchers have sought for years to detect this quiet gravitational-wave hum.

In a landmark paper in the US journal,Physical Review X, the two researchers have developed a new, more sensitive way of searching for the gravitational-wave background.

"Measuring the gravitational-wave background will allow us to study populations of black holes at vast distances. Someday, the technique may enable us to see gravitational waves from the Big Bang, hidden behind gravitational waves from black holes and neutron stars", Dr. Thrane stated.

The researchers developed computer simulations of faint black hole signals, collecting masses of data until they were convinced that - within the simulated data - was faint, but unambiguous evidence of black hole mergers. Dr. Smith is optimistic that the method will yield a detection when applied to real data. According to Dr. Smith, recent improvements in data analysis will enable the detection of "what people had spent decades looking for". The new method is estimated to be one thousand times more sensitive, which should bring the long-sought goal within reach.

Importantly the researchers will have access to a new $4 million supercomputer, launched in March at the Swinburne University of Technology. The computer, called OzSTAR, will be used by scientists to look for gravitational waves in LIGO data.

According to OzGRav Director, Professor Matthew Bailes, the supercomputer will allow OzGrav's researchers to attempt these kind of landmark discoveries. "It is 125,000 times more powerful than the first supercomputer I built at the institution in 1998."

The OzStar computer differs from most of the more than 13,000 computers used by the LIGO community, according to Dr. Smith, including those at CalTech and MIT. OzStar employs graphical processor units (GPUs), rather than more traditional central processing units (CPUs). For some applications, GPUs are hundreds of times faster. "By harnessing the power of GPUs, OzStar has the potential to make big discoveries in gravitational-wave astronomy", Dr. Smith stated.

Source: Monash University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-04-16

Focus

GO FAIR initiative to create implementation networks for stewardship of data ...

Quantum computing

Atos Quantum Learning Machine can now simulate real qubits ...

UCSB/Google researchers in quantum computing professor John Martinis' group outline their plan for quantum supremacy ...

New qubit now works without breaks ...

Prototype of most advanced quantum memory presented by two Kazan universities ...

The thermodynamics of computing ...

Focus on Europe

GÉANT confirms Erik Huizer as CEO ...

ISC launches Travel Grant Programme to enable students and young researchers to attend the conference ...

Student develops gaming technology for environmental and scientific research ...

Prof. Dr. Xiaoxiang Zhu wins the 2018 PRACE Ada Lovelace Award for HPC ...

Academia and industry collaborate to drive UK supercomputer adoption ...

Middleware

Queen Mary University of London HPC cluster performance increases several orders of magnitude, saving time and cost ...

Hardware

University of Texas hires next director of no. 1 ranked computational institute ...

James Ang joins Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as chief scientist for computing ...

Fujitsu commences sales of PRIMERGY x86 server aimed at data centre companies ...

Tohoku University deploys vSMP Foundation for "The Supercomputer System" ...

Chinese leading weather research institute selected Mellanox InfiniBand, replacing OmniPath in an existing data centre ...

Valleytronics discovery could extend limits of Moore's Law ...

Top HPC clusters and workstations for AI, ML developed by Nor-Tech ...

Demonstration of world record: 159 Tb/s transmission over 1,045 km with 3-mode fiber ...

Applications

Boston partners with Excelero and Pixit Media at NAB to demo joint solution for media workflows ...

Fujitsu launches "Heart Explorer" to study heart behaviour ...

U.S. Department of Energy supports doctoral research into on-site analysis of supercomputer simulations ...

Scientists use machine learning to speed discovery of metallic glass ...

Machine learning could help search for gravitational waves ...

Artificial Intelligence can now detect gravitational waves ...

Jon Bashor retires after 27 years of service to national labs ...

Research and software: perspectives from different communities ...

The background hum of space could reveal hidden black holes ...

How to catch a fish genome with Big Data ...

Translational research community debates on the EGA and its impact on health ...

The Cloud

Capitalizing on the opportunity of hybrid cloud in HPC ...

St. Jude Cloud launches for researchers worldwide ...