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Primeur weekly 2018-04-09

Quantum computing

Frogs and mushrooms bubble up in quantum fluids ...

Focus on Europe

TrueBrainConnect: Predicting brain disorders - New ERC-funded project at Charité to combine EEG data and machine learning ...

Middleware

TACC promotes longtime visualization expert to director ...

The OpenMP ARB appoints Barbara Chapman of Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Lab to its Board of Directors ...

GigaSpaces boosts Big Data and analytics performance with InsightEdge Platform 12.3 ...

Hardware

Singapore's NSCC and Australia's Pawsey Supercomputing Centre sign an MOU to boost HPC scientific collaboration ...

World's first 2 petaflop Deep Learning system, NVIDIA DGX-2, features Mellanox InfiniBand and Ethernet solutions ...

Burton Smith, Cray co-founder a dies at 77 ...

REFLEX CES to launch low profile PCIe board XpressGXA10-LP 1150 and 1151 versions ...

Supermicro first-to-market with IoT embedded solutions optimized for new 8th Gen Intel Core processors ...

Preferred Networks to launch MN-1b private sector supercomputer adopting NVIDIA Tesla V100 32GB GPUs ...

GigaSpaces InsightEdge Platform with Intel technology accelerates AI innovations ...

DDN and Dalet announce certified solutions; Reimagining centralized storage for ultra HD broadcast workflows at scale ...

Applications

University of Alabama in Huntsville researchers' supercomputer simulations shed light on the heliospheric interface ...

Academic researchers look to Argonne's Mira supercomputer to better understand boiling phenomena, bubble formation and two-phase bubbly flow inside nuclear reactors ...

Anticipating the dangers of space ...

NVIDIA Project Clara supercomputing platform redefines medical imaging ...

University of Illinois team brings subatomic resolution to computational microscope ...

BSC launches the Bioinfo4Women - Outstanding Young Female Bioinformaticians Programme ...

Statewide Users Group spring conference showcases variety of research and OSC resources ...

Insilico Taiwan calls Taiwanese AI talents with MolHack starting from April 23 ...

Dark matter might not be interactive after all ...

Forecasting the 'whether' with computer modelling ...

William Tang wins 2018 NVIDIA Global Impact Award ...

The Cloud

Gluster Community releases Gluster 4.0 with enhanced container integration ...

Forecasting the 'whether' with computer modelling

5 Apr 2018 Pittsburgh - Can a computer tell whether El Niño affects famine in South Sudan? How about whether national currency devaluation affects refugee displacement? Whether flooding affects government upheaval? A comprehensive model explaining whether these factors relate would require far more data than even the most brilliant minds can imagine and far more imagination than even the most powerful computers can muster.

Thanks to a $2.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) researchers are looking to harmonize the power of computation with the insight of human intuition. The result would resemble models used by meteorologists to forecast the weather but include complex socioeconomic and geopolitical dynamics.

"Our first challenge is to predict food shortages in South Sudan", stated Natasa Miskov-Zivanov, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering. "We not only consider numerical data but textual data from news sources, reports, and databases to predict future crises."

Dr. Miskov-Zivanov leads as principal investigator on one of eight teams in DARPA's World Modellers programme, which will focus primarily on explaining world problems like famine in South Sudan. Her study, called STORM: Standardized Technology for Optimizing Data Modelling, will attempt to automate the design of computer models to describe complex, causal relationships between current events.

"Computer models can synthesize vast amounts of data, but just because two data points are correlated doesn't mean we know how one influences the other. We want to be able to have experts analyze and tweak the computer models, and therefore strengthen our overall understanding of how each node is related", explained Dr. Miskov-Zivanov.

In the discrete modelling approach taken by Dr. Miskov-Zivanov, the nodes are things that change over time, such as crop production and exchange rates. Edges of the model are connections between nodes and their influences on each other. The result is a model that can explain "how" two events are related beyond an observed correlation. Through the combination of human expertise and Big Data processing, the World Modellers aim to create a model that accurately describes cause and effect in the real world.

Drs. Eduard Hovy, Michael Trick, and Cheryl Telmer from CMU join Dr. Miskov-Zivanov's team on the World Modellers project. Dr. Telmer previously worked with Dr. Miskov-Zivanov during the 2014-2018 DARPA Big Mechanism programme aimed at creating models of cancer pathways from automated reading of research papers. Dr. Miskov-Zivanov received $2.4 million of funding during Big Mechanism for a project called Automated Integration of Mechanisms in Cancer (AIMCancer), which took a similar approach to data modelling as the new World Modelers program but focused on understanding signaling pathways of cancer.

"During Big Mechanism, we developed a framework for automating assembly and explanation of models, combining the information extracted by machine reading from published papers, experimental data, and expert knowledge. While the framework has been mostly used in biology, the technology was built to apply to other systems", stated Dr. Miskov-Zivanov.

Big Mechanism had the advantage of extracting information from research papers, but World Modellers will attempt to build its models based on the much less consistent information extracted from the news and discussion of current events. By finding patterns in the causes and effects of significant events, the researchers hope to develop computer models describing complex networks that cause famines or create economic trends.

"The computer does not know the difference between molecules, people, or nations", stated Dr. Miskov-Zivanov. "If we collect enough information, verify how data points relate to each other with expert opinion, and model networks to describe these relationships, we will get a more accurate picture than ever before of what triggers major events."

Source: University of Pittsburgh

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-04-09

Quantum computing

Frogs and mushrooms bubble up in quantum fluids ...

Focus on Europe

TrueBrainConnect: Predicting brain disorders - New ERC-funded project at Charité to combine EEG data and machine learning ...

Middleware

TACC promotes longtime visualization expert to director ...

The OpenMP ARB appoints Barbara Chapman of Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Lab to its Board of Directors ...

GigaSpaces boosts Big Data and analytics performance with InsightEdge Platform 12.3 ...

Hardware

Singapore's NSCC and Australia's Pawsey Supercomputing Centre sign an MOU to boost HPC scientific collaboration ...

World's first 2 petaflop Deep Learning system, NVIDIA DGX-2, features Mellanox InfiniBand and Ethernet solutions ...

Burton Smith, Cray co-founder a dies at 77 ...

REFLEX CES to launch low profile PCIe board XpressGXA10-LP 1150 and 1151 versions ...

Supermicro first-to-market with IoT embedded solutions optimized for new 8th Gen Intel Core processors ...

Preferred Networks to launch MN-1b private sector supercomputer adopting NVIDIA Tesla V100 32GB GPUs ...

GigaSpaces InsightEdge Platform with Intel technology accelerates AI innovations ...

DDN and Dalet announce certified solutions; Reimagining centralized storage for ultra HD broadcast workflows at scale ...

Applications

University of Alabama in Huntsville researchers' supercomputer simulations shed light on the heliospheric interface ...

Academic researchers look to Argonne's Mira supercomputer to better understand boiling phenomena, bubble formation and two-phase bubbly flow inside nuclear reactors ...

Anticipating the dangers of space ...

NVIDIA Project Clara supercomputing platform redefines medical imaging ...

University of Illinois team brings subatomic resolution to computational microscope ...

BSC launches the Bioinfo4Women - Outstanding Young Female Bioinformaticians Programme ...

Statewide Users Group spring conference showcases variety of research and OSC resources ...

Insilico Taiwan calls Taiwanese AI talents with MolHack starting from April 23 ...

Dark matter might not be interactive after all ...

Forecasting the 'whether' with computer modelling ...

William Tang wins 2018 NVIDIA Global Impact Award ...

The Cloud

Gluster Community releases Gluster 4.0 with enhanced container integration ...