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Primeur weekly 2018-04-09

Quantum computing

Frogs and mushrooms bubble up in quantum fluids ...

Focus on Europe

TrueBrainConnect: Predicting brain disorders - New ERC-funded project at Charité to combine EEG data and machine learning ...

Middleware

TACC promotes longtime visualization expert to director ...

The OpenMP ARB appoints Barbara Chapman of Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Lab to its Board of Directors ...

GigaSpaces boosts Big Data and analytics performance with InsightEdge Platform 12.3 ...

Hardware

Singapore's NSCC and Australia's Pawsey Supercomputing Centre sign an MOU to boost HPC scientific collaboration ...

World's first 2 petaflop Deep Learning system, NVIDIA DGX-2, features Mellanox InfiniBand and Ethernet solutions ...

Burton Smith, Cray co-founder a dies at 77 ...

REFLEX CES to launch low profile PCIe board XpressGXA10-LP 1150 and 1151 versions ...

Supermicro first-to-market with IoT embedded solutions optimized for new 8th Gen Intel Core processors ...

Preferred Networks to launch MN-1b private sector supercomputer adopting NVIDIA Tesla V100 32GB GPUs ...

GigaSpaces InsightEdge Platform with Intel technology accelerates AI innovations ...

DDN and Dalet announce certified solutions; Reimagining centralized storage for ultra HD broadcast workflows at scale ...

Applications

University of Alabama in Huntsville researchers' supercomputer simulations shed light on the heliospheric interface ...

Academic researchers look to Argonne's Mira supercomputer to better understand boiling phenomena, bubble formation and two-phase bubbly flow inside nuclear reactors ...

Anticipating the dangers of space ...

NVIDIA Project Clara supercomputing platform redefines medical imaging ...

University of Illinois team brings subatomic resolution to computational microscope ...

BSC launches the Bioinfo4Women - Outstanding Young Female Bioinformaticians Programme ...

Statewide Users Group spring conference showcases variety of research and OSC resources ...

Insilico Taiwan calls Taiwanese AI talents with MolHack starting from April 23 ...

Dark matter might not be interactive after all ...

Forecasting the 'whether' with computer modelling ...

William Tang wins 2018 NVIDIA Global Impact Award ...

The Cloud

Gluster Community releases Gluster 4.0 with enhanced container integration ...

Dark matter might not be interactive after all

Hubble Space Telescope image of the four giant galaxies at the heart of cluster Abell 3827. An almost three-hour exposure shows the view at wavelengths visible to the human eye, and the near infrared, as used in the original 2015 study. The distorted image of a more distant galaxy behind the cluster is faintly visible, wrapped around the four galaxies. Credit: NASA/ESA/Richard Massey, Durham University.5 Apr 2018 Liverpool - Astronomers are back in the dark about what dark matter might be, after new observations showed the mysterious substance may not be interacting with forces other than gravity after all. Dr. Andrew Robertson of Durham University has presented the new results at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.

Three years ago, a Durham-led international team of researchers thought they had made a breakthrough in ultimately identifying what dark matter is.

Observations using the Hubble Space Telescope appeared to show that a galaxy in the Abell 3827 cluster - approximately 1.3 billion light years from Earth - had become separated from the dark matter surrounding it.

Such an offset is predicted during collisions if dark matter interacts with forces other than gravity, potentially providing clues about what the substance might be.

The chance orientation at which the Abell 3827 cluster is seen from Earth makes it possible to conduct highly sensitive measurements of its dark matter.

However, the same group of astronomers now say that new data from more recent observations shows that dark matter in the Abell 3827 cluster has not separated from its galaxy after all. The measurement is consistent with dark matter feeling only the force of gravity.

Lead author Dr. Richard Massey, in the Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, at Durham University, stated: "The search for dark matter is frustrating, but that's science. When data improves, the conclusions can change. Meanwhile the hunt goes on for dark matter to reveal its nature. So long as dark matter doesn't interact with the Universe around it, we are having a hard time working out what it is."

The Universe is composed of approximately 27 percent dark matter with the remainder largely consisting of the equally mysterious dark energy. Normal matter, such as planets and stars, contributes a relatively small five per cent of the Universe.

There is believed to be about five times more dark matter than all the other particles understood by science, but nobody knows what it is.

However, dark matter is an essential factor in how the Universe looks today, as without the constraining effect of its extra gravity, galaxies like our Milky Way would fling themselves apart as they spin.

In this latest study, the researchers used the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) in Chile, South America, to view the Abell 3827 cluster.

ALMA picked up on the distorted infra-red light from an unrelated background galaxy, revealing the location of the otherwise invisible dark matter that remained unidentified in their previous study.

Research co-author Professor Liliya Williams, of the University of Minnesota, stated: "We got a higher resolution view of the distant galaxy using ALMA than from even the Hubble Space Telescope. The true position of the dark matter became clearer than in our previous observations."

While the new results show dark matter staying with its galaxy, the researchers said it did not necessarily mean that dark matter does not interact. Dark matter might just interact very little, or this particular galaxy might be moving directly towards us, so we would not expect to see its dark matter displaced sideways, the team added.

Several new theories of non-standard dark matter have been invented over the past two years and many have been simulated at Durham University using high-powered supercomputers.

Dr. Andrew Robertson, who is a co-author of the work, and based at Durham University's Institute for Computational Cosmology, added: "Different properties of dark matter do leave tell-tale signs. We will keep looking for nature to have done the experiment we need, and for us to see it from the right angle. One especially interesting test is that dark matter interactions make clumps of dark matter more spherical. That's the next thing we're going to look for."

To measure the dark matter in hundreds of galaxy clusters and continue this investigation, Durham University has just finished helping to build the new SuperBIT telescope, which gets a clear view by rising above the Earth's atmosphere under a giant helium balloon.

The research was funded by the Royal Society and the Science and Technology Facilities Council in the UK and NASA. The findings will appear in a new paper in the journalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

A supercomputer simulation of a collision between two galaxy clusters, similar to the real object known as the 'Bullet Cluster', and showing the same effects tested for in Abell 3827. All galaxy clusters contain stars (orange), hydrogen gas (shown as red) and invisible dark matter (shown as blue). Individual stars, and individual galaxies are so far apart from each other that they whizz straight past each other. The diffuse gas slows down and becomes separated from the galaxies, due to the forces between ordinary particles that act as friction. If dark matter feels only the force of gravity, it should stay in the same place as the stars, but if it feels other forces, its trajectory through this giant particle collider would be changed. Credit: Andrew Robertson/Institute for Computational Cosmology/Durham University.

Source: Royal Astronomical Society

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-04-09

Quantum computing

Frogs and mushrooms bubble up in quantum fluids ...

Focus on Europe

TrueBrainConnect: Predicting brain disorders - New ERC-funded project at Charité to combine EEG data and machine learning ...

Middleware

TACC promotes longtime visualization expert to director ...

The OpenMP ARB appoints Barbara Chapman of Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Lab to its Board of Directors ...

GigaSpaces boosts Big Data and analytics performance with InsightEdge Platform 12.3 ...

Hardware

Singapore's NSCC and Australia's Pawsey Supercomputing Centre sign an MOU to boost HPC scientific collaboration ...

World's first 2 petaflop Deep Learning system, NVIDIA DGX-2, features Mellanox InfiniBand and Ethernet solutions ...

Burton Smith, Cray co-founder a dies at 77 ...

REFLEX CES to launch low profile PCIe board XpressGXA10-LP 1150 and 1151 versions ...

Supermicro first-to-market with IoT embedded solutions optimized for new 8th Gen Intel Core processors ...

Preferred Networks to launch MN-1b private sector supercomputer adopting NVIDIA Tesla V100 32GB GPUs ...

GigaSpaces InsightEdge Platform with Intel technology accelerates AI innovations ...

DDN and Dalet announce certified solutions; Reimagining centralized storage for ultra HD broadcast workflows at scale ...

Applications

University of Alabama in Huntsville researchers' supercomputer simulations shed light on the heliospheric interface ...

Academic researchers look to Argonne's Mira supercomputer to better understand boiling phenomena, bubble formation and two-phase bubbly flow inside nuclear reactors ...

Anticipating the dangers of space ...

NVIDIA Project Clara supercomputing platform redefines medical imaging ...

University of Illinois team brings subatomic resolution to computational microscope ...

BSC launches the Bioinfo4Women - Outstanding Young Female Bioinformaticians Programme ...

Statewide Users Group spring conference showcases variety of research and OSC resources ...

Insilico Taiwan calls Taiwanese AI talents with MolHack starting from April 23 ...

Dark matter might not be interactive after all ...

Forecasting the 'whether' with computer modelling ...

William Tang wins 2018 NVIDIA Global Impact Award ...

The Cloud

Gluster Community releases Gluster 4.0 with enhanced container integration ...