Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-04-18

Quantum computing

QxBranch and Commonwealth Bank Australia launch quantum computing simulator ...

Indistinguishable photons key to advancing quantum technologies ...

Recent advances and new insights into quantum image processing ...

Focus on Europe

Teratec 2017 Forum issues Call for Participation ...

Hazel Hen helps explain ultrafast phase transition ...

Hardware

Engility to pursue NASA advanced computing services opportunity ...

DDN names Jessica Popp General Manager of IME business unit ...

Eni fires up its HPC3, the new hybrid high performance computer for E&P activities ...

DDN advances object storage performance and delivers industry's most flexible and cost-effective data protection ...

Asetek to receive RackCDU D2C order for new HPC installation ...

PSNC deploys ADVA Optical Networking 96-channel 100G core solution in pan-European research network ...

Putting a spin on logic gates ...

Tool for checking complex computer architectures reveals flaws in emerging design ...

System better allots network bandwidth, for faster page loads ...

Applications

SDSC to enhance campus research computing resources for bioinformatics ...

U.S. Department of Energy's INCITE programme seeks advanced computational research proposals for 2018 ...

Tutorials schedule announced for PEARC17 ...

Fujitsu awarded three prizes for science and technology from MEXT ...

Fujitsu and Grid partner to jointly develop AI services ...

IBM brings Anaconda Open Data Science platform to IBM Cognitive Systems ...

Jefferson Lab scientists eavesdrop on chatter of sub-atomic world ...

Buckle up - Climate change to increase severe aircraft turbulence ...

Beyond the frontiers of Supercomputing ...

Scientists develop a novel algorithm, inspired on the behaviour of bee colonies, which will help dismantling criminal social networks ...

The Cloud

Atos leads C2NET consortium - the first collaborative Cloud-based platform for SMEs to support manufacturing management ...

Comcast Business now provides enterprises with dedicated links to IBM Cloud ...

Nimbix ushers in next-generation GPUs for Cloud-based deep learning ...

USFlash

Group works toward devising topological superconductor ...

Stanford researchers create deep learning algorithm that could boost drug development ...

Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into artificial intelligence systems ...

Putting a spin on logic gates

Full majority gate prototype. The brass block serves as an electric ground plate ensuring an efficient insertion of the RF currents to the antennae and, on the other hand, microwave connectors mounted to the block allow for the embedding of the device into the microwave set-up. Credit: Fischer/Kewenig/Meyer. 10 Apr 2017 Kaiserslautern - Computer electronics are shrinking to small enough sizes that the very electrical currents underlying their functions can no longer be used for logic computations in the ways of their larger-scale ancestors. A traditional semiconductor-based logic gate called a majority gate, for instance, outputs current to match either the "0" or "1" state that comprise at least two of its three input currents - or equivalently, three voltages. But how do you build a logic gate for devices too small for classical physics?

One recent experimental demonstration, the results of which are published inApplied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, uses the interference of spin-waves - synchronous waves of electron spin alignment observed in magnetic systems. The spin-wave majority gate prototype, made of Yttrium-Iron-Garnet, comes out of a new collaborative research centre funded by the German Research Foundation, named Spin+X. The work has also been supported by the European Union within the project InSpin and has been conducted in collaboration with the Belgian nanotechnology research institute IMEC.

"The motto of the research center Spin+X is 'spin in its collective environment', so it basically aims at investigating any type of interaction of spins - with light and matter and electrons and so on", stated Tobias Fischer, a doctoral student at the University of Kaiserslautern in Germany, and lead author of the paper. "More or less the main picture we are aiming at is to employ spin-waves in information processing. Spin waves are the fundamental excitations of magnetic materials."

So instead of using classical electric currents or voltages to send input information to a logic gate, the Kaiserslautern-based international team uses vibrations in a magnetic material's collective spin - essentially creating nanoscale waves of magnetization that can then interfere to produce Boolean calculations.

"You have atomic magnetic moments in your magnetic material which interact with each other and due to this interaction, there are wave-like excitations that can propagate in magnetic materials", Tobias Fischer stated. "The particular device we were investigating is based on the interference of these waves. If you use wave excitations instead of currents, then you can make use of wave interference, and that comes with certain advantages."

Using wave interference to produce the majority gate's output provides two parameters to use in controlling information: the wave's amplitude, and phase. In principle, that makes this concept more efficient also since a majority gate can substitute up to 10 transistors in modern electronic devices.

"The device we were investigating consists of three inputs where we excite waves and they combine", Tobias Fischer stated. "Depending on the input phases where you encode the information, that determines the phase of the output signal, hence, defining the logic output state '0' or '1'. That is actually information processing and that's what we want."

This first device prototype, though physically larger than what Tobias Fischer and his colleagues see for eventual large-scale use, clearly demonstrates the applicability of spin-wave phenomena for reliable information processing at GHz frequencies.

Because the wavelengths of these spin waves are easily reduced to the nanoscale, so too - though perhaps not quite as easily - can be the gate device itself. Doing so may actually improve the functionality, reducing its sensitivity to unwanted field fluctuations. Besides, nano-scaling will increase spin-wave velocities that will allow for an increase in computing speed.

"What we aim for is the miniaturization of the device, and the smaller you make the device, the less sensitive it becomes to these influences", Tobias Fischer stated. "If you look at how many wavelengths fit into this propagation length, the fewer there are, the less influence a change of the wavelength has on the output. So basically downscaling the device would also come with more benefits."

Furthermore, much like antennae, a single device can be operated at multiple frequencies simultaneously. This will allow for parallel computing using the same "core" of a future spin-wave processor.

"One of my colleagues in Kaiserslautern is into spin-wave multiplexing and de-multiplexing", Tobias Fischer stated. "We are also going in that direction, to use multiple frequencies and that would be a good compliment to this majority gate."

The article, "Experimental prototype of a spin-wave majority gate", is authored by T. Fischer, M. Kewenig, D.A. Bozhko, A.A. Serga, I.I. Syvorotka, F. Ciubotaru, C. Adelmann, B. Hillebrands and A.V. Chumak. The article has appeared in Applied Physics Letters on April 10, 2017.

Source: American Institute of Physics - AIP

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-04-18

Quantum computing

QxBranch and Commonwealth Bank Australia launch quantum computing simulator ...

Indistinguishable photons key to advancing quantum technologies ...

Recent advances and new insights into quantum image processing ...

Focus on Europe

Teratec 2017 Forum issues Call for Participation ...

Hazel Hen helps explain ultrafast phase transition ...

Hardware

Engility to pursue NASA advanced computing services opportunity ...

DDN names Jessica Popp General Manager of IME business unit ...

Eni fires up its HPC3, the new hybrid high performance computer for E&P activities ...

DDN advances object storage performance and delivers industry's most flexible and cost-effective data protection ...

Asetek to receive RackCDU D2C order for new HPC installation ...

PSNC deploys ADVA Optical Networking 96-channel 100G core solution in pan-European research network ...

Putting a spin on logic gates ...

Tool for checking complex computer architectures reveals flaws in emerging design ...

System better allots network bandwidth, for faster page loads ...

Applications

SDSC to enhance campus research computing resources for bioinformatics ...

U.S. Department of Energy's INCITE programme seeks advanced computational research proposals for 2018 ...

Tutorials schedule announced for PEARC17 ...

Fujitsu awarded three prizes for science and technology from MEXT ...

Fujitsu and Grid partner to jointly develop AI services ...

IBM brings Anaconda Open Data Science platform to IBM Cognitive Systems ...

Jefferson Lab scientists eavesdrop on chatter of sub-atomic world ...

Buckle up - Climate change to increase severe aircraft turbulence ...

Beyond the frontiers of Supercomputing ...

Scientists develop a novel algorithm, inspired on the behaviour of bee colonies, which will help dismantling criminal social networks ...

The Cloud

Atos leads C2NET consortium - the first collaborative Cloud-based platform for SMEs to support manufacturing management ...

Comcast Business now provides enterprises with dedicated links to IBM Cloud ...

Nimbix ushers in next-generation GPUs for Cloud-based deep learning ...

USFlash

Group works toward devising topological superconductor ...

Stanford researchers create deep learning algorithm that could boost drug development ...

Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into artificial intelligence systems ...