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Primeur weekly 2013-04-22

The Cloud

HP brings power of OpenStack to the enterprise ...

IBM acquires UrbanCode to help businesses rapidly deliver mobile, Cloud, Big Data and social software ...

EuroFlash

Programming and tUning Massively Parallel Systems Summer School to issue Call for Participation ...

Second PRACE Digest now available for download ...

Reward system for research data required that incorporates data metrics ...

Photons run out of loopholes ...

New Allinea DDT 4.0 Release brings software development for remote HPC systems closer to home ...

GCS HPC System SuperMUC to deliver 6.4 Petaflops by 2014/2015 ...

New high-speed cameras for Westerbork telescope ...

European Academia selects TotalView debugger ...

Collaboration aims to harness the energy of 2,000 suns ...

USFlash

Two Tsinghua University institutions respectively win champion and runner up in ASC13 ...

DataDirect Networks to build world's fastest storage system for Titan, world's most powerful supercomputer ...

Australia's Ballarat Grammar School blocks web threats with HP software-defined networks security application ...

Jupiter Medical Center chooses HP to support application growth ...

Apollo Group speeds performance with Oracle Engineered Systems ...

Bose-Einstein condensates evaluated for communicating among quantum computers ...

Researchers use supercomputers to learn impacts on Earth's magnetic field ...

Indiana University dedicating Big Red II supercomputer April 26 ...

NNSA's Sequoia supercomputer transitions to classified work, ensuring safety, security, effectiveness of US nuclear deterrent ...

New high-speed cameras for Westerbork telescope


18 Apr 2013 Dwingeloo - A team of Dutch astronomers and engineers, including NLeSC eScience Engineer Dr. Rob V. van Nieuwpoort, and led by astronomer Joeri van Leeuwen (ASTRON) was awarded a grant to turn the new 'Apertif' receivers on the Westerbork telescope into high-speed cameras. The receivers will expand the Westerbork field of view by over a factor 30 but the system is restricted to making images at the rate of one every second. The new upgrade increases this to 10,000 frames per second, allowing astronomers to survey the sky with greater sensitivity to quick changes. The grant of 540.000 euro by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) is part scientific 'NWO-M' investment subsidy, part related to the top sector High Tech Systems and Materials due to the potential for mobile broadband communications. Astronomers will use these new high-speed cameras to detect bright radio flashes from our Milky Way, and beyond.

The Apertif receivers allow astronomers to sensitively scan the sky for radio galaxies that are mostly unchanging. Throughout the Galaxy, however, many short bright radio bursts that last less than one thousandth of a second also go off. Some of these are emitted by radio pulsars, spinning Galactic lighthouses, but others originate from far outside our Galaxy. The nature of these far-off bursts is unclear, but given their distance they must represent enormous explosions comparable to the ‘supernovae' that are observed when massive stars explode.

Using the grant, Apertif's vision will be further trained: the receivers' current ability to see as sharp as an eagle will be extended to the quickness of a fly. The algorithms on the current imaging chips will be extended to form 10,000 frames per second. Furthermore, the image processing capacity will be extended with an extra supercomputer, as powerful as the Dutch national supercomputer, to immediately process the data the telescope receives. The phased array feeds and burst-detection processing of Apertif are pathfinder technologies for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

In a few years, the high-speed cameras can scan the sky for bright bursts. Thanks to the new processing capabilities these bursts can be recognized immediately, and their properties can be studied with the Westerbork telescope and other telescopes, before they fade. Astronomers aim to thus determine the nature of the explosive bursts.

Source: Netherlands eScience Center - NLeSC

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2013-04-22

The Cloud

HP brings power of OpenStack to the enterprise ...

IBM acquires UrbanCode to help businesses rapidly deliver mobile, Cloud, Big Data and social software ...

EuroFlash

Programming and tUning Massively Parallel Systems Summer School to issue Call for Participation ...

Second PRACE Digest now available for download ...

Reward system for research data required that incorporates data metrics ...

Photons run out of loopholes ...

New Allinea DDT 4.0 Release brings software development for remote HPC systems closer to home ...

GCS HPC System SuperMUC to deliver 6.4 Petaflops by 2014/2015 ...

New high-speed cameras for Westerbork telescope ...

European Academia selects TotalView debugger ...

Collaboration aims to harness the energy of 2,000 suns ...

USFlash

Two Tsinghua University institutions respectively win champion and runner up in ASC13 ...

DataDirect Networks to build world's fastest storage system for Titan, world's most powerful supercomputer ...

Australia's Ballarat Grammar School blocks web threats with HP software-defined networks security application ...

Jupiter Medical Center chooses HP to support application growth ...

Apollo Group speeds performance with Oracle Engineered Systems ...

Bose-Einstein condensates evaluated for communicating among quantum computers ...

Researchers use supercomputers to learn impacts on Earth's magnetic field ...

Indiana University dedicating Big Red II supercomputer April 26 ...

NNSA's Sequoia supercomputer transitions to classified work, ensuring safety, security, effectiveness of US nuclear deterrent ...