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Primeur weekly 2014-03-24

Special

Crowd computing takes a closer look at the social life of molecules ...

Exascale supercomputing

Dongarra calls for renewed focus on research into high-end math ...

The Cloud

HP expands testing for mobile and Cloud-based application delivery ...

Kamal Osman Jamjoom Group LLC transforms performance management system with Oracle HCM Cloud ...

EuroFlash

HPC performance insight improves usage at Cardiff University ...

Early-Bird registration opens for International Supercomputing Conference ...

Europe's most powerful supercomputer cleared for users ...

Bright Computing expands product line to manage HPC, OpenStack, and Apache Hadoop clusters ...

World-renowned computational biophysicist, Klaus Schulten to deliver ISC'14 keynote ...

Innovative computer under scrutiny ...

Plans for world class research centre in the United Kingdom ...

2nd International Workshop on OpenCL full technical programme is now available ...

Excelian offers a fully managed compute Grid solution with pay-as-you-go infrastructure costs ...

Prêt-à-fabriquer: Real-time simulation of textiles ...

Follow the ant trail for drug design ...

CFAED presents the new microchip 'Tomahawk 2' at the DATE'14 in Dresden ...

USFlash

Cray to install China's first Cray XC30 supercomputer at Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital ...

Dot Hill storage products drill down to support oil & gas applications ...

The New York Genome Center and IBM Watson Group announce collaboration to advance genomic medicine ...

SDSC's Gordon supercomputer assists in whole-genome sequencing analysis under collaboration with Janssen ...

HP delivers powerful system with faster analytics engine for SAP HANA environments ...

Southern Methodist University announces name for new supercomputer: ManeFrame ...

Oregon physicists use geometry to understand 'jamming' process ...

NIST chips help BICEP2 telescope find direct evidence of origin of the universe ...

University of Idaho researchers gain new advantage with one of the nation's most powerful computers ...

Study finds forest corridors help plants disperse their seeds ...

Computer analyzes massive clinical databases to properly categorize asthma patients ...

Start-up focuses on reliable, efficient cooling for computer servers ...

NIST chips help BICEP2 telescope find direct evidence of origin of the universe


Anthony Turner/JPL
18 Mar 2014 Boulder - The view back in time - way back to the origins of the universe - just got clearer. Much clearer. A team of U.S. cosmologists using the BICEP2 telescope at the South Pole have discovered the first direct evidence of the rapid inflation of the universe at the dawn of time, thanks in part to technology developed and built by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

The BICEP2 camera relies, in part, on the extraordinary signal amplification made possible by NIST's superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs).

The team of cosmologists from Harvard University, the University of Minnesota, the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Stanford University/SLAC used BICEP2 to observe telltale patterns in the cosmic microwave background - the afterglow of the Big Bang almost 14 billion years ago - that support the leading theory about the origins of the universe.

The patterns, so-called "B-mode polarization", are the signature of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves are direct evidence that the currently observable universe expanded rapidly from a subatomic volume in the first tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang. The project was funded by the National Science Foundation.

Researchers at NIST's campus in Boulder, Colorado, made the custom superconducting circuits, or chips, that amplify electrical signals generated by microwave detectors measuring primordial particles of light. JPL made the detectors. The NIST chips, which along with the detectors are chilled to cryogenic temperatures, also assemble the signals into a sequential time stream that can be read by conventional room-temperature electronics.

"This is an exciting and important new result, and we are pleased that technology developed at NIST played a role", stated physicist Gene Hilton, who was responsible for production of the NIST chips.

The 16 NIST chips contain a total of more than 2,000 SQUIDs, which measure the magnetic fields created in coils that carry and amplify the very small currents generated by the detectors. NIST researchers invented a method for wiring hundreds of SQUID signal amplifiers together to make large arrays of superconducting detectors practical - part of the cutting-edge technology that helps make BICEP2 especially powerful.

Physicists just celebrated the 50th anniversary of the SQUID, which has broad applications from medicine to mining and materials analysis - and now more than ever, cosmology.
Source: National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2014-03-24

Special

Crowd computing takes a closer look at the social life of molecules ...

Exascale supercomputing

Dongarra calls for renewed focus on research into high-end math ...

The Cloud

HP expands testing for mobile and Cloud-based application delivery ...

Kamal Osman Jamjoom Group LLC transforms performance management system with Oracle HCM Cloud ...

EuroFlash

HPC performance insight improves usage at Cardiff University ...

Early-Bird registration opens for International Supercomputing Conference ...

Europe's most powerful supercomputer cleared for users ...

Bright Computing expands product line to manage HPC, OpenStack, and Apache Hadoop clusters ...

World-renowned computational biophysicist, Klaus Schulten to deliver ISC'14 keynote ...

Innovative computer under scrutiny ...

Plans for world class research centre in the United Kingdom ...

2nd International Workshop on OpenCL full technical programme is now available ...

Excelian offers a fully managed compute Grid solution with pay-as-you-go infrastructure costs ...

Prêt-à-fabriquer: Real-time simulation of textiles ...

Follow the ant trail for drug design ...

CFAED presents the new microchip 'Tomahawk 2' at the DATE'14 in Dresden ...

USFlash

Cray to install China's first Cray XC30 supercomputer at Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital ...

Dot Hill storage products drill down to support oil & gas applications ...

The New York Genome Center and IBM Watson Group announce collaboration to advance genomic medicine ...

SDSC's Gordon supercomputer assists in whole-genome sequencing analysis under collaboration with Janssen ...

HP delivers powerful system with faster analytics engine for SAP HANA environments ...

Southern Methodist University announces name for new supercomputer: ManeFrame ...

Oregon physicists use geometry to understand 'jamming' process ...

NIST chips help BICEP2 telescope find direct evidence of origin of the universe ...

University of Idaho researchers gain new advantage with one of the nation's most powerful computers ...

Study finds forest corridors help plants disperse their seeds ...

Computer analyzes massive clinical databases to properly categorize asthma patients ...

Start-up focuses on reliable, efficient cooling for computer servers ...