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Primeur weekly 2017-02-20

Focus

HPC expert Genias Benelux to show its skillful expertise in brandnew website ...

Are billion Euro Flagships the right way to finance innovative areas like graphene, human brain research and quantum computing? ...

Exascale supercomputing

Advanced fusion code led by PPPL selected to participate in Early Science Programmes on three new DOE Office of Science pre-exascale supercomputers ...

Focus on Europe

From robotics to particle physics: Data analytics gets the spotlight in Distinguished Talk series at ISC 2017 ...

A new spin on electronics ...

Data mining tools for personalized cancer treatment ...

Why host HPC in Iceland to tackle Big Data for life sciences at Earlham Insititute ...

Biological experiments become transparent - anywhere, any time ...

Middleware

IBM delivers new platform to help clients address storage challenges at massive scale ...

Hewlett Packard Enterprise unveils most significant 3PAR Flash storage innovations to date ...

Hardware

Tokyo Institute of Technology partners with DDN on Tsubame3.0 to build forward-looking AI and Big Data computing infrastructure ...

Mellanox demonstrates four times improvement in crypto performance with Innova IPsec 40G Ethernet network adapter ...

Supermicro launches BigTwin - the industry's highest performing Twin multi-node system supporting the full range of CPUs, maximum memory and all-flash NVMe ...

Applications

Researchers catch extreme waves with higher-resolution modelling ...

Researchers are creating software to 'clean' large datasets, making it easier for scientists and the public to use Big Data ...

Designing new materials from 'small' data ...

Success by deception ...

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer ...

'Lossless' metamaterial could boost efficiency of lasers and other light-based devices ...

Perimeter Institute researchers apply machine learning to condensed matter physics ...

When treating brain aneurysms, two isn't always better than one ...

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers ...

Analyzing data for transportation systems using TACC's Rustler, XSEDE ECSS support ...

NCSA facilitates performance comparisons with China's nr. 1 supercomputer ...

IBM delivers Watson for cyber security to power cognitive security operations centres ...

The Cloud

Optimizing data centre placement and network design to strengthen Cloud computing ...

Dutch start-up solution impacts data centres ...

OpenFog Consortium releases landmark reference architecture for Fog computing ...

IBM brings machine learning to the private Cloud ...

IBM accelerates hybrid Cloud adoption by enabling channel partners to offer VMware solutions ...

Oracle launches Cloud service to help organisations integrate disparate data and drive real-time analytics ...

A new spin on electronics

The extremely thin, electrically conducting layer between the materials lanthanum-aluminate (LaAlO2) and strontium-titanate (SrTiO3) transports spin-information from the point of injection to a detector. Credit: Christoph Hohmann / Nanosystems Initiative Munich.15 Feb 2017 Munich - Modern computer technology is based on the transport of electric charge in semiconductors. But this technology's potential will be reaching its limits in the near future, since the components deployed cannot be miniaturized further. But, there is another option: using an electron's spin, instead of its charge, to transmit information. A team of scientists from Munich and Kyoto is now demonstrating how this works.

Computers and mobile devices continue providing ever more functionality. The basis for this surge in performance has been progressively extended miniaturization. However, there are fundamental limits to the degree of miniaturization possible, meaning that arbitrary size reductions will not be possible with semiconductor technology.

Researchers around the world are thus working on alternatives. A particularly promising approach involves so-called spin electronics. This takes advantage of the fact that electrons possess, in addition to charge, angular momentum - the spin. The experts hope to use this property to increase the information density and at the same time the functionality of future electronics.

Together with colleagues at the Kyoto University in Japan scientists at the Walther-Meißner-Institute (WMI) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in Garching have now demonstrated the transport of spin information at room temperature in a remarkable material system.

In their experiment, they demonstrated the production, transport and detection of electronic spins in the boundary layer between the materials lanthanum-aluminate (LaAlO2) and strontium-titanate (SrTiO3). What makes this material system unique is that an extremely thin, electrically conducting layer forms at the interface between the two non-conducting materials: a so-called two-dimensional electron gas.

The German-Japanese team has now shown that this two-dimensional electron gas transports not only charge, but also spin. "To achieve this we first had to surmount several technical hurdles", stated Dr. Hans Hübl, scientist at the Chair for Technical Physics at TUM and Deputy Director of the Walther-Meißner-Institute. "The two key questions were: How can spin be transferred to the two-dimensional electron gas and how can the transport be proven?"

The scientists solved the problem of spin transfer using a magnetic contact. Microwave radiation forces its electrons into a precession movement, analogous to the wobbling motion of a top. Just as in a top, this motion does not last forever, but rather, weakens in time - in this case by imparting its spin onto the two-dimensional electron gas.

The electron gas then transports the spin information to a non-magnetic contact located one micrometer next to the contact. The non-magnetic contact detects the spin transport by absorbing the spin, building up an electric potential in the process. Measuring this potential allowed the researchers to systematically investigate the transport of spin and demonstrate the feasibility of bridging distances up to one hundred times larger than the distance of today's transistors.

Based on these results, the team of scientists is now researching to what extent spin electronic components with novel functionality can be implemented using this system of materials.

The research was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the context of the Cluster of Excellence "Nanosystems Initiative Munich" (NIM).

The publication titled " Strong evidence for d-electron spin transport at room temperature at a LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface " is authored by R. Ohshima, Y. Ando, K. Matsuzaki, T. Susaki, M. Weiler, S. Klingler, H. Huebl, E. Shikoh, T. Shinjo, S.T.B Goennenwein and M. Shiraishi. It has been published inNature Materialsas Advanced Online Publication on 13 February, 2017.

Source: Technical University of Munich - TUM

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-02-20

Focus

HPC expert Genias Benelux to show its skillful expertise in brandnew website ...

Are billion Euro Flagships the right way to finance innovative areas like graphene, human brain research and quantum computing? ...

Exascale supercomputing

Advanced fusion code led by PPPL selected to participate in Early Science Programmes on three new DOE Office of Science pre-exascale supercomputers ...

Focus on Europe

From robotics to particle physics: Data analytics gets the spotlight in Distinguished Talk series at ISC 2017 ...

A new spin on electronics ...

Data mining tools for personalized cancer treatment ...

Why host HPC in Iceland to tackle Big Data for life sciences at Earlham Insititute ...

Biological experiments become transparent - anywhere, any time ...

Middleware

IBM delivers new platform to help clients address storage challenges at massive scale ...

Hewlett Packard Enterprise unveils most significant 3PAR Flash storage innovations to date ...

Hardware

Tokyo Institute of Technology partners with DDN on Tsubame3.0 to build forward-looking AI and Big Data computing infrastructure ...

Mellanox demonstrates four times improvement in crypto performance with Innova IPsec 40G Ethernet network adapter ...

Supermicro launches BigTwin - the industry's highest performing Twin multi-node system supporting the full range of CPUs, maximum memory and all-flash NVMe ...

Applications

Researchers catch extreme waves with higher-resolution modelling ...

Researchers are creating software to 'clean' large datasets, making it easier for scientists and the public to use Big Data ...

Designing new materials from 'small' data ...

Success by deception ...

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer ...

'Lossless' metamaterial could boost efficiency of lasers and other light-based devices ...

Perimeter Institute researchers apply machine learning to condensed matter physics ...

When treating brain aneurysms, two isn't always better than one ...

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers ...

Analyzing data for transportation systems using TACC's Rustler, XSEDE ECSS support ...

NCSA facilitates performance comparisons with China's nr. 1 supercomputer ...

IBM delivers Watson for cyber security to power cognitive security operations centres ...

The Cloud

Optimizing data centre placement and network design to strengthen Cloud computing ...

Dutch start-up solution impacts data centres ...

OpenFog Consortium releases landmark reference architecture for Fog computing ...

IBM brings machine learning to the private Cloud ...

IBM accelerates hybrid Cloud adoption by enabling channel partners to offer VMware solutions ...

Oracle launches Cloud service to help organisations integrate disparate data and drive real-time analytics ...