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Primeur weekly 2017-02-13

Focus

Funding agencies and academia need to rethink reward structure for computational tool developers to tackle big scientific challenges ...

OpenAire to support more technical e-Infrastructures with Open Research Data guidelines, publication and training ...

Exascale supercomputing

ISC High Performance keynote forecasts future role of HPC in weather and climage prediction ...

Crowd computing

Towards equal access to digital coins ...

Quantum computing

Large groups of photons on demand - an equivalent of photonic 'integrated circuit' ...

Protecting quantum computing networks against hacking threats ...

Sorting machine for atoms ...

Focus on Europe

HPC-Europa3 provides access to European HPC systems ...

Peter the Great Saint Petersburg Polytechnic University is first university to introduce computational computer code for Airbus ...

Middleware

Introducing Hazelcast Jet: a new lightweight, distributed data processing engine ...

Bright Computing announces strategic alliance with Curtiss-Wright ...

Hardware

NVIDIA powers new class of supercomputing workstations with breakthrough capabilities for design and engineering ...

Van Andel research institute optimises HPC pipeline to drive research discoveries and new drug therapies with end-to-end DDN solution ...

CoolIT Systems issued U.S. patent for modular heat-transfer solutions ...

ORNL researchers break data transfer efficiency record ...

Cray reports 2016 full year and fourth quarter financial results ...

Supermicro deploys 30,000+ MicroBlade servers to enable one of the world's highest Efficiency (1.06 PUE) data centres ...

Mellanox ships more than 100,000 cables for next generation 100 Gb/s networks ...

UMass Amherst boosts deep learning research with powerful new GPU cluster ...

Oak Ridge National Laboratory enhances data integrity and accessibility with Active Archive Solutions ...

Applications

ANSYS spurs pervasive engineering simulation with release 18 ...

Computing sciences students: Get your team together for the SC17 Student Cluster Competition in Denver ...

Latest Allinea update advances code optimization across platforms ...

Con Edison selects C3 IoT for Big Data and predictive analytics platform and applications ...

New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries - and our understanding of life ...

When data's deep, dark places need to be illuminated ...

Computer trained to predict which AML patients will go into remission and which will relapse ...

The Cloud

Cycle Computing collaborates with ANSYS on its Enterprise Cloud HPC offering ...

IBM launches "Digital - Nation Africa" and invests $70 million to bring digital skills to Africa with free, Watson-powered skills platform for 25 million people ...

Sorting machine for atoms

The physicists from University of Bonn at their sorting machine for Atoms (from left): Dr. Andrea Alberti, Carsten Robens, Prof. Dr. Dieter Meschede, Dr. Wolfgang Alt and Stefan Brakhane. Photo: Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn. 9 Feb 2017 Bonn - Physicists at the University of Bonn have cleared a further hurdle on the path to creating quantum computers: in a recent study, they present a method with which they can very quickly and precisely sort large numbers of atoms. The work has now been published inPhysical Review Letters.

Imagine you are standing in a grocery store buying apple juice. Unfortunately, all of the crates are half empty because other customers have removed individual bottles at random. So you carefully fill your crate bottle by bottle. But wait: The neighbouring crate is filled in exactly the opposite way. It has bottles where your crate has gaps. If you could lift these bottles in one hit and place them in your crate, it would be full straight away. You could save yourself a lot of work.

Unfortunately, such solutions don't (yet) exist for half-empty drinks crates. However, physicists at the University of Bonn want to sort thousands of atoms however they like in the future in this way - and in a matter of seconds. Around the world, scientists are currently looking for methods that enable sorting processes in the microcosm. The proposal by Bonn-based researchers could push the development of future quantum computers a crucial step forward. This allows atoms to interact with each other in a targeted manner in order to be able to exploit quantum-mechanical effects for calculations. In addition, the particles have to be brought into spatial proximity with one another.

The physicists are using a special property of atoms to create their sorting machine: These rotate around their own axis like little spinning tops. The direction of rotation - the spin - can be influenced with microwaves. The physicists thus initially set all of the atoms off in the same direction of rotation in their experiment.

In this state, it was possible to load the particles onto a laser beam. However, beforehand, they had to manipulate the laser in such a way that it matched the spin of its particles - a process known as polarization. The atoms were then held by the polarized laser beam in such a manner that they were unable to move. Every particle occupies a particular place on the laser beam - similar to the bottles in the crate.

However, like in the drinks crate, some of the places in the laser beam are also unoccupied. "We thus reversed the direction of rotation in a very targeted manner for individual atoms", explained Dr. Andrea Alberti, the team leader at the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Bonn. "These particles were then no longer captured by our laser beam. However, we were able to grab them with a second, differently polarized laser beam and thus move them as desired."

The transport beam can, in principle, move as many atoms as one likes at the same time. As this takes place, they retain their position to each other. As in the example with the bottles, several particles can thus be lifted at once and placed in the gaps between other atoms in one go. "Our sorting method is thus extremely efficient", explained the lead author of the study, Carsten Robens. "It does not make any major difference whether we are sorting hundreds or thousands of atoms - the time needed only increases slightly." For the moment, the researchers only worked with four atoms in their experiment, which is now being published .

In principle, the method is suitable for creating any atom pattern. This makes it interesting for solid-state physicists, for instance, to investigate the behaviour of semiconductor crystals under certain conditions.

Source: Universität Bonn

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-02-13

Focus

Funding agencies and academia need to rethink reward structure for computational tool developers to tackle big scientific challenges ...

OpenAire to support more technical e-Infrastructures with Open Research Data guidelines, publication and training ...

Exascale supercomputing

ISC High Performance keynote forecasts future role of HPC in weather and climage prediction ...

Crowd computing

Towards equal access to digital coins ...

Quantum computing

Large groups of photons on demand - an equivalent of photonic 'integrated circuit' ...

Protecting quantum computing networks against hacking threats ...

Sorting machine for atoms ...

Focus on Europe

HPC-Europa3 provides access to European HPC systems ...

Peter the Great Saint Petersburg Polytechnic University is first university to introduce computational computer code for Airbus ...

Middleware

Introducing Hazelcast Jet: a new lightweight, distributed data processing engine ...

Bright Computing announces strategic alliance with Curtiss-Wright ...

Hardware

NVIDIA powers new class of supercomputing workstations with breakthrough capabilities for design and engineering ...

Van Andel research institute optimises HPC pipeline to drive research discoveries and new drug therapies with end-to-end DDN solution ...

CoolIT Systems issued U.S. patent for modular heat-transfer solutions ...

ORNL researchers break data transfer efficiency record ...

Cray reports 2016 full year and fourth quarter financial results ...

Supermicro deploys 30,000+ MicroBlade servers to enable one of the world's highest Efficiency (1.06 PUE) data centres ...

Mellanox ships more than 100,000 cables for next generation 100 Gb/s networks ...

UMass Amherst boosts deep learning research with powerful new GPU cluster ...

Oak Ridge National Laboratory enhances data integrity and accessibility with Active Archive Solutions ...

Applications

ANSYS spurs pervasive engineering simulation with release 18 ...

Computing sciences students: Get your team together for the SC17 Student Cluster Competition in Denver ...

Latest Allinea update advances code optimization across platforms ...

Con Edison selects C3 IoT for Big Data and predictive analytics platform and applications ...

New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries - and our understanding of life ...

When data's deep, dark places need to be illuminated ...

Computer trained to predict which AML patients will go into remission and which will relapse ...

The Cloud

Cycle Computing collaborates with ANSYS on its Enterprise Cloud HPC offering ...

IBM launches "Digital - Nation Africa" and invests $70 million to bring digital skills to Africa with free, Watson-powered skills platform for 25 million people ...