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Primeur weekly 2017-02-06

Focus

Photon and Neutron Community ready to act as a go-between for the e-Infrastructures and user communities ...

Bridging socio-cultural distance in science through technical community-engaging mechanisms ...

Exascale supercomputing

How to improve data management in the supercomputers of the future ...

Crowd computing

Your computer can help scientists search for new childhood cancer treatments ...

Quantum computing

Quantum phase transition observed for the first time ...

Quantum matter: Shaken, but not stirred ...

First ever blueprint unveiled to construct a large scale quantum computer ...

Focus on Europe

PRACE opens Tier-1 for Tier-0 service ...

Middleware

New version of Univa Unisight 4.1 provides comprehensive tool to support IT purchasing decisions ...

Czech TV speeds broadcast and production delivery with DDN's fully integrated MEDIAScaler platform ...

Optimized compiler yields more-efficient parallel programmes ...

Hardware

Three magnetic states for each hole: researchers investigate the potential of metal grids for electronic components ...

Making the switch to polarization diversity ...

SDSC's 'Comet' supercomputer surpasses '10,000 users' milestone ...

New Cheyenne supercomputer triples scientific capability with greater efficiency ...

GBP 3.2 million for Midlands-based high performance computing centre ...

Applications

Machine learning accurately predicts metallic defects ...

Jupiter Medical Center implements revolutionary Watson for Oncology to help oncologists make data-driven cancer treatment decisions ...

University of Delaware's Anderson Janotti receives NSF Career Award to model defects in complex materials ...

Supercomputing and experiment combine for first look at magnetism of real nanoparticle ...

Researchers flip script for Li-Ion electrolytes to simulate better batteries ...

Huawei and SURFsara join forces for ICT innovation in Smart Healthcare and Smart Energy ...

The shape of melting in two dimensions: University of Michigan team uses Titan to explore fundamental phase transitions ...

Nature Geoscience highlights CALIOPE's ability to "provide decision makers with the information they need to take preventive action" on air quality ...

Magnetic recording with light and no heat on garnet ...

Breaking the jargon barrier ...

Carnegie Mellon Artificial Intelligence beats top poker pros ...

Preventing blood clots with a new metric for heart function: Simulations on Stampede supercomputer reveal better way of predicting future clots in the left ventricle ...

Berkeley Lab resources used to model superluminous supernova in 2D for first time ...

The Cloud

Utilities regulators see value in the Cloud and Cloud technology investments as critical to utilities' success ...

Three magnetic states for each hole: researchers investigate the potential of metal grids for electronic components


Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf in Germany have calculated that the specific layout of four holes ('antidots') in a layer of cobalt will accommodate 15 different combinations for programming. Credit: HZDR.
2 Feb 2017 Dresden - Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured.

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in order to program its magnetic properties. His colleagues from the National University in Singapore produced the grid using a photolithographic process similar to that currently used in chip manufacture. Approximately 250 nanometers sized holes, so-called antidots, were created at regular intervals - with interspaces of only 150 nanometers - in the cobalt layer. In order to be able to stably program it, the Singapore experts followed the Dresden design, which specified a metal layer thickness of approximately 50 nanometers.

At these dimensions the cobalt antidot grid displayed interesting properties: Dr. Bali's team discovered that with the aid of an externally applied magnetic field three distinct magnetic states around each hole could be configured. The scientists called these states "G", "C" and "Q". Dr. Bali stated: "Antidots are now in the international research spotlight. By optimizing the antidot geometry we were able to show that the spins, or the magnetic moments of the electrons, could be reliably programmed around the holes."

Since the individually programmable holes are situated in a magnetic metal layer, the grid geometry has potential use in computers that would work with spin-waves instead of electric current. "Spin-waves are similar to the so-called Mexican waves you see in a football stadium. The wave propagates through the stadium, but the individual fans, in our case the electrons, stay seated", explained Dr. Bali. Logic chips utilizing such spin-waves would use far less power than today's processors, because no electrical current is involved.

Many magnetic states can be realized in the perforated grid so that the spin-waves can, for example, be assigned specific directions. This could allow for a higher processing speed in future logic chips. "Our perforated grids could also operate as components for future circuits working with spin-waves", estimated Dr. Bali. Doctoral candidate, Tobias Schneider, is now investigating the dynamics developed by the spin-waves in such perforated grids. Among other aspects he is participating in the development of special computer programmes making possible the complex calculation of the magnetic states in perforated grids.

The results have been published in the journal Scientific Reports .
Source: Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-02-06

Focus

Photon and Neutron Community ready to act as a go-between for the e-Infrastructures and user communities ...

Bridging socio-cultural distance in science through technical community-engaging mechanisms ...

Exascale supercomputing

How to improve data management in the supercomputers of the future ...

Crowd computing

Your computer can help scientists search for new childhood cancer treatments ...

Quantum computing

Quantum phase transition observed for the first time ...

Quantum matter: Shaken, but not stirred ...

First ever blueprint unveiled to construct a large scale quantum computer ...

Focus on Europe

PRACE opens Tier-1 for Tier-0 service ...

Middleware

New version of Univa Unisight 4.1 provides comprehensive tool to support IT purchasing decisions ...

Czech TV speeds broadcast and production delivery with DDN's fully integrated MEDIAScaler platform ...

Optimized compiler yields more-efficient parallel programmes ...

Hardware

Three magnetic states for each hole: researchers investigate the potential of metal grids for electronic components ...

Making the switch to polarization diversity ...

SDSC's 'Comet' supercomputer surpasses '10,000 users' milestone ...

New Cheyenne supercomputer triples scientific capability with greater efficiency ...

GBP 3.2 million for Midlands-based high performance computing centre ...

Applications

Machine learning accurately predicts metallic defects ...

Jupiter Medical Center implements revolutionary Watson for Oncology to help oncologists make data-driven cancer treatment decisions ...

University of Delaware's Anderson Janotti receives NSF Career Award to model defects in complex materials ...

Supercomputing and experiment combine for first look at magnetism of real nanoparticle ...

Researchers flip script for Li-Ion electrolytes to simulate better batteries ...

Huawei and SURFsara join forces for ICT innovation in Smart Healthcare and Smart Energy ...

The shape of melting in two dimensions: University of Michigan team uses Titan to explore fundamental phase transitions ...

Nature Geoscience highlights CALIOPE's ability to "provide decision makers with the information they need to take preventive action" on air quality ...

Magnetic recording with light and no heat on garnet ...

Breaking the jargon barrier ...

Carnegie Mellon Artificial Intelligence beats top poker pros ...

Preventing blood clots with a new metric for heart function: Simulations on Stampede supercomputer reveal better way of predicting future clots in the left ventricle ...

Berkeley Lab resources used to model superluminous supernova in 2D for first time ...

The Cloud

Utilities regulators see value in the Cloud and Cloud technology investments as critical to utilities' success ...