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Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

27 Feb 2012 Santa Barbara - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the nanoscale and the ever-elusive quantum computer are among the advancements edging closer toward the realm of possibility, and a new study co-authored by a UC Santa Barbara researcher may give both an extra nudge. The findings appear inScience Express, an on-line version of the journalScience.

Ania Bleszynski Jayich, an assistant professor of physics who joined the University of California - Santa Barbara (UCSB) faculty in 2010, spent a year at Harvard working on an experiment that coupled nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond to nanomechanical resonators. That project is the basis for the new paper, "Coherent sensing of a mechanical resonator with a single spin qubit".

A nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre is a specific defect in diamond that exhibits a quantum magnetic behaviour known as spin. When a single spin in diamond is coupled with a magnetic mechanical resonator - a device used to generate or select specific frequencies - it points toward the potential for a new nanoscale sensing technique with implications for biology and technology, Ania Bleszynski Jayich explained.

Among those possible future applications of such a technique is magnetic resonance imaging on a scale small enough to image the structure of proteins - an as-yet unaccomplished feat that Ania Bleszynski Jayich called "one of the holy grails of structural biology".

"The same physics that will allow the NV centre to detect the magnetic field of the resonator, hopefully, will allow MRI on the nanoscale", Ania Bleszynski Jayich stated. "It could make MRI more accurate, and able to see more. It's like having a camera with eight megapixels versus one with two megapixels and taking a picture of someone's face. You can't see features that are smaller than the size of a pixel. So do they have three freckles, or do they all look like one big freckle?"

"That's the idea", Ania Bleszynski Jayich continued. "To resolve individual freckles, so to speak, to see what a protein is made up of. What we found in this paper suggests that it is possible, although a significant amount of work still needs to be done."

Though further into the future based on the approach used for this paper, Ania Bleszynski Jayich said, there is also the potential for such a coupling to be advanced and exploited as a possible route toward the development of a hybrid quantum system, or quantum computer.

Ania Bleszynski Jayich collaborated on the project with researchers Shimon Kolkowitz, Quirin Unterreithmeier, Steven Bennett, and Mikhail Lukin, all from Harvard; Peter Rabl, from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Science; and J.G.E. Harris, from Yale. The work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation, the Center for Ultracold Atoms, and the Packard Foundation.
Source: University of California - Santa Barbara

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect