Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

21 Feb 2012 Munich - Three years ago Professor Christian Pfleiderer and his team from the physics department at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) discovered an entirely new magnetic structure in a silicon manganese crystal - a grid of magnetic eddies. Together with the team of Professor Achim Rosch from the University of Cologne, he studied the properties of these eddies, so-called skyrmions, named after the British physicist Tony Skyrme, who predicted their existence 50 years ago. They were expecting results in the field of so-called spintronics, nano-electric components that utilize not only the electric charge of electrons for processing information, but also their magnetic momentum, known as spin.

While Peter Grünberg and Albert Fert received the Nobel Prize in 2007 for work on significantly faster data readout, research today concentrates on the question of how magnetic information can be written directly to materials via electric current. However, the extremely strong electric currents required produce side effects, which are practically untamable, even in nano-structures. Since skyrmions can be moved with 100,000 times less current, interest has been aroused in both the scientific community and in industry.

Although magnetic eddies were discovered in silicon manganese it was clear that it would not remain the only material capable of generating skyrmions. This has turned out to be true. Meanwhile, Japanese researchers have proven that individual eddies can be generated, and a group of physicists from the Research Center Jülich, as well as the Universities of Hamburg and Kiel, provided evidence that magnetic eddies can be generated on surfaces. They managed to build a data bit out of only 15 atoms. By way of comparison, a magnetic bit on a common hard drive requires about one million atoms.

Yet, writing, updating and reading out information remained a problem. So far, Professor Pfleiderer's team has resorted to neutron radiation from the neighbouring research reactor FRM II at the TU Muenchen to study the materials. "We can just take the crystals generated in our laboratory at the physics department, walk over there and use the neutrons to measure the magnetic structure, its dynamics and many other properties", stated Christian Pfleiderer.

Using neutron radiation, the scientists were able to prove that even the tiniest of currents are sufficient to move the magnetic eddies. Now the physicists have developed a method by which skyrmions can be moved and measured in a purely electronic manner. "When the electric eddies move in a material, they generate an electric field", stated Christian Pfleiderer. "And that is something we can measure directly with electronic equipment available in our laboratory."

At present a current is used in the read/write head of a hard drive to generate a magnetic field in order to magnetize a spot on the hard drive and thus write a data bit. Skyrmions, in contrast, can be moved directly - and that with very small currents. "This should make saving and processing data much more compact and energy-efficient", stated Christian Pfleiderer.

However, the measurement of this phenomenon still depends on very low temperatures. The European Research Council is currently funding a project with the aim of developing new materials that will permit the use of skyrmions at room temperature. But there is a lot of research work yet to be done before the first electronic components based on this technology reach the market.

This research was sponsored through grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, SFB 608, TRR 80, FOR 960), the Deutsche Telekom Stiftung, the European Research Council (ERC Advanced Grant) as well as the TUM Graduate School and the Bonn Cologne Graduate School.

The original publication is titled "Emergent electrodynamics of skyrmions in a chiral magnet". The authors are T. Schulz, R. Ritz, A. Bauer, M. Halder, M. Wagner, C. Franz, C. Pfleiderer, K. Everschor, M. Garst and A. Rosch. The paper appears inNature Physics, Online, 19 Februar 2012 - DOI: 10.1038/nphys2231 at http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nphys2231
Source: Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect