Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect

Single-atom transistor is perfect

19 Feb 2012 Sydney - In a remarkable feat of micro-engineering, University of New South Wales (UNSW) physicists have created a working transistor consisting of a single atom placed precisely in a silicon crystal. The tiny electronic device, described in a paper published in the journalNature Nanotechnology, uses as its active component an individual phosphorus atom patterned between atomic-scale electrodes and electrostatic control gates. This unprecedented atomic accuracy may yield the elementary building block for a future quantum computer with unparalleled computational efficiency.

Until now, single-atom transistors have been realised only by chance, where researchers either have had to search through many devices or tune multi-atom devices to isolate one that works.

"But this device is perfect", stated Professor Michelle Simmons, group leader and director of the ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication at UNSW. "This is the first time anyone has shown control of a single atom in a substrate with this level of precise accuracy."

The microscopic device even has tiny visible markers etched onto its surface so researchers can connect metal contacts and apply a voltage, according to research fellow and lead author Dr. Martin Fuechsle from UNSW.

"Our group has proved that it is really possible to position one phosphorus atom in a silicon environment - exactly as we need it - with near-atomic precision, and at the same time register gates", he stated.

The device is also remarkable, said Dr. Fuechsle, because its electronic characteristics exactly match theoretical predictions undertaken with Professor Gerhard Klimeck's group at Purdue University in the US and Professor Hollenberg's group at the University of Melbourne, the joint authors on the paper.

The UNSW team used a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to see and manipulate atoms at the surface of the crystal inside an ultra-high vacuum chamber. Using a lithographic process, they patterned phosphorus atoms into functional devices on the crystal then covered them with a non-reactive layer of hydrogen.

Hydrogen atoms were removed selectively in precisely defined regions with the super-fine metal tip of the STM. A controlled chemical reaction then incorporated phosphorus atoms into the silicon surface.

Finally, the structure was encapsulated with a silicon layer and the device contacted electrically using an intricate system of alignment markers on the silicon chip to align metallic connects. The electronic properties of the device were in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions for a single phosphorus atom transistor.

It is predicted that transistors will reach the single-atom level by about 2020 to keep pace with Moore's Law, which describes an ongoing trend in computer hardware that sees the number of chip components double every 18 months.

This major advance has developed the technology to make this possible well ahead of schedule and gives valuable insights to manufacturers into how devices will behave once they reach the atomic limit, said Professor Simmons.
Source: University of New South Wales

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect