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Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

23 Feb 2012 Gaithersburg - Sometimes knowing that a new technology works is not enough. You also must know why it works to get marketplace acceptance. New information from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) about how layered switching devices for novel computer memory systems work, for example, may now allow these structures to come to market sooner, helping bring about faster, lower-powered computers.

Switches based on transition-metal oxides have great potential as memory devices that retain their information even when the power is turned off. One type is made by stacking four different materials: a layer of copper and one of a metal oxide sandwiched between two metal layers that act as electrodes. Such systems can act as an on/off switch when a voltage is applied between the electrodes, but just why they behave as they do is a matter of debate.

Types of non-volatile memory already exist - thumb drives make use of it - but they do not yet perform well enough to function as the working memory of a computer's central processor. If metal oxides can be perfected for this use, they could enable computers that boot up in seconds and use far less energy.

To study the switching mechanism, the NIST research team built its own version, but with a twist: They used ferromagnetic metals for the electrodes instead of the non-magnetic metals typically used. They found that when an electric field is applied between the ferromagnetic electrodes, it causes the formation of tiny copper filaments that stretch through the metal-oxide layer. The filaments, about 16 nm long, are created or annihilated depending on the direction of the applied voltage through the electrodes, making or breaking the switch connection.

"The presence of such filaments is the only explanation that makes any sense as to why our structures make such good switches", stated Curt Richter of NIST's Semiconductor Electronics Division.

One key to the team's discovery was their use of the physics of "spin" - a quantum property of electrons that has two possible values, either up or down. From the top electrode, the team sent a current made of electrons that had a polarized spin state, and they found that their spin state had not changed by the time the electrons reached the bottom.

"Only if a filament made of high-quality copper formed would the spins maintain their state", Curt Richter stated. "This finding was an end in itself, but it also suggests the layered structure could have applications in 'spintronics' where electron spin is used to carry and process information."

H.-J. Jang, O.A. Kirillov, O.D. Jurchescu and C.A. Richter are the authors of "Spin transport in memristive devices". The article appears inApplied Physics Letters100, 043510 (2012). DOI:10.1063/1.3679114, published on-line on 26 January 2012.

Source: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-02-27

Desktop Grids

First release of XtremWeb-HEP 8

Parabon announces Frontier 6 at Emerging Technologies Symposium

The Cloud

Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) Engine powers Imagine MD's Electronic Health Record - Practice Management and Revenue Management Solutions

At the CeBIT Fair, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and FZI will present safe concepts for the Cloud

PALLADIO software simulator analyzes programmes prior to implementation

EuroFlash

Wirth Research set to race into the future with Bull High Performance Computing and Panasas Storage solutions

German supercomputer Hermit performance of the Petaflop class for research, development and industry

Rogue Wave Software and Moscow State University collaborate to debug on Russia's largest supercomputer

Science and Technology Committee publishes report on science in the Met Office

Saving data in vortex structures - New physical phenomenon could drastically reduce energy consumption by computers

CoolEmAll to address energy implications of European Commission HPC investment

USFlash

Cray forms new subsidiary in China

The Green Grid welcomes individual memberships for the first time in its history

University of Texas at Austin Supercomputing Center to receive $10 million in private funding

Scoping the cost of the world's biggest new supercomputer

Mathematician sees artistic side to father of computer

UC Santa Barbara researcher's new study may lead to MRIs on a nanoscale

Transforming computers of the future with optical interconnects

Intel's next-generation communications platform key to accelerated network services

HP helps telecoms tap LTE networks to deliver personalized mobile experience

THOR.LO streamlines infrastructure footprint with HP

NIST reveals switching mechanism in promising computer memory device

Engineering and geoscience faculty help lead $3 million NSF Delta research collaboration

Twists to quantum technique for secret messaging give unanticipated power

Paving the way to Canada's next big industry - the quantum information frontier

SanDisk develops world's smallest 128Gb NAND flash memory chip

Single-atom transistor is perfect