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Primeur weekly 2021-01-11

Exascale supercomputing

Preparing an earthquake risk assessment application for exascale ...

Quantum computing

A bit too much: reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing ...

The world's first integrated quantum communication network ...

Focus on Europe

GBP 20 million funding boost for science supercomputer will drive science simulation and UK-wide innovation ...

Northern Data acquires data centre site in Northern Sweden fully powered by green energy ...

Research and Markets to issue report on High Performance Computing (HPC) Market by Component, Deployment Type, Organization Size, Server Prices Band, Application Area, and Region - Global Forecast to 2025 ...

Environmental researchers benefit from powerful supercomputer at Plymouth Marine Laboratory ...

Middleware

XSEDE welcomes new service providers ...

Hardware

IBM appoints Gary D. Cohn as Vice Chairman ...

IBM appoints Martin Schroeter as CEO of "NewCo" independent managed infrastructure services business to spin out from IBM ...

Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing ...

E4 Computer Engineering announces University of Pisa as the first customer of Ultrafast Storage, Totally Integrated (USTI), the new solution for high performance distributed block storage ...

Existing Northern Data bitcoin mining customer expands contract volume by more than 200 MW ...

Power XL Pro launched as new professional server based on AMD EPYC technology ...

Swinburne-led research team demonstrates world's fastest optical neuromorphic processor ...

Applications

Supercomputer models describe chloride's role in corrosion ...

HPC-AI Advisory Council to host HPC AI AC Conference in Japan on January, 26 ...

Insights through atomic simulation ...

Advanced materials in a snap ...

New data-driven global climate model provides projections for urban environments ...

Frequency data for stable power supply ...

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders ...

UTSA Artificial Intelligence Consortium receives over $1 million in research funding ...

Entangling electrons with heat ...

NIO partners with NVIDIA to develop a new generation of automated driving electric vehicles ...

Navantia leverages Ansys' digital transformation solutions to design next-gen naval vessels ...

Engineering graduate student places second in international research competition ...

The Cloud

Covid-19 genome sequencing project gets major upgrade ...

IBM provides Harris-Stowe State University with $2 million in Artificial Intelligence and open hybrid Cloud technology resources to help students build modern skills ...

IBM and Avertra collaborate to drive digital transformation for energy & utilities clients with IBM Cloud ...

UJET CCaaS Cloud contact centre now available on Oracle Cloud Marketplace ...

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders


The system: A crystal lattice made of light traps atoms in several bilayer sheets. Tomographic images show the (spin-) densities in a single layer. They provide information about the magnetic ordering of the atoms. The image on the right shows the density of one layer averaged over twelve realizations (orange red). Credit: Marcell Gall, Nicola Wurz et al./ Nature.
6 Jan 2021 Bonn - They are as thin as a hair, only a hundred thousand times thinner - so-called two-dimensional materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, have been booming in research for years. They became known to a wider audience when two Russian-British scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2010 for the discovery of graphene, a building block of graphite. The special feature of such materials is that they possess novel properties that can only be explained with the help of the laws of quantum mechanics and that may be relevant for enhanced technologies. Researchers at the University of Bonn, Germany have now used ultracold atoms to gain new insights into previously unknown quantum phenomena. They found out that the magnetic orders between two coupled thin films of atoms compete with each other. The study has been published in the journalNature.

Quantum systems realize very unique states of matter originating from the world of nanostructures. They facilitate a wide variety of new technological applications, e.g. contributing to secure data encryption, introducing ever smaller and faster technical devices and even enabling the development of a quantum computer. In the future, such a computer could solve problems which conventional computers cannot solve at all or only over a long period of time.

How unusual quantum phenomena arise is still far from being fully understood. To shed light on this, a team of physicists led by Prof. Michael Köhl at the Matter and Light for Quantum Computing Cluster of Excellence at the University of Bonn are using so-called quantum simulators, which mimic the interaction of several quantum particles - something that cannot be done with conventional methods. Even state-of-the-art computer models cannot calculate complex processes such as magnetism and electricity down to the last detail.

The simulator used by the scientists consists of ultracold atoms - ultracold because their temperature is only a millionth of a degree above absolute zero. The atoms are cooled down using lasers and magnetic fields. The atoms are located in optical lattices, i.e. standing waves formed by superimposing laser beams. This way, the atoms simulate the behaviour of electrons in a solid state. The experimental setup allows the scientists to perform a wide variety of experiments without external modifications.

Within the quantum simulator, the scientists have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring the magnetic correlations of exactly two coupled layers of a crystal lattice. "Via the strength of this coupling, we were able to rotate the direction in which magnetism forms by 90 degrees - without changing the material in any other way", first authors Nicola Wurz and Marcell Gall, doctoral students in Michael Köhl's research group, explained.

To study the distribution of atoms in the optical lattice, the physicists used a high-resolution microscope with which they were able to measure magnetic correlations between the individual lattice layers. In this way, they investigated the magnetic order, i.e. the mutual alignment of the atomic magnetic moments in the simulated solid state. They observed that the magnetic order between layers competed with the original order within a single layer, concluding that the more strongly layers were coupled, the more strongly correlations formed between the layers. At the same time, correlations within individual layers were reduced.

The new results make it possible to better understand the magnetism propagating in the coupled layer systems at the microscopic level. In the future, the findings are to help make predictions about material properties and achieve new functionalities of solids, among other things. Since, for example, high-temperature superconductivity is closely linked to magnetic couplings, the new findings could, in the long run, contribute to the development of new technologies based on such superconductors.

The Matter and Light for Quantum Computing (ML4Q) Cluster of Excellence is a research cooperation by the universities of Cologne, Aachen and Bonn, as well as the Forschungszentrum Jülich. It is funded as part of the Excellence Strategy of the German federal and state governments. The aim of ML4Q is to develop new computing and networking architectures using the principles of quantum mechanics. ML4Q builds on and extends the complementary expertise in the three key research fields: solid-state physics, quantum optics, and quantum information science.

The Cluster of Excellence is embedded in the Transdisciplinary Research Area "Building Blocks of Matter and Fundamental Interactions" at the University of Bonn. In six different TRAs, scientists from a wide range of faculties and disciplines come together to work on future-relevant research topics.

Marcell Gall, Nicola Wurz, Jens Samland, Chun Fai Chan, and Michael Köhl are the authors of the paper titled " Competing magnetic orders in a bilayer Hubbard model with ultracold atoms ", published inNature- DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-03058-x.
Source: University of Bonn

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2021-01-11

Exascale supercomputing

Preparing an earthquake risk assessment application for exascale ...

Quantum computing

A bit too much: reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing ...

The world's first integrated quantum communication network ...

Focus on Europe

GBP 20 million funding boost for science supercomputer will drive science simulation and UK-wide innovation ...

Northern Data acquires data centre site in Northern Sweden fully powered by green energy ...

Research and Markets to issue report on High Performance Computing (HPC) Market by Component, Deployment Type, Organization Size, Server Prices Band, Application Area, and Region - Global Forecast to 2025 ...

Environmental researchers benefit from powerful supercomputer at Plymouth Marine Laboratory ...

Middleware

XSEDE welcomes new service providers ...

Hardware

IBM appoints Gary D. Cohn as Vice Chairman ...

IBM appoints Martin Schroeter as CEO of "NewCo" independent managed infrastructure services business to spin out from IBM ...

Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing ...

E4 Computer Engineering announces University of Pisa as the first customer of Ultrafast Storage, Totally Integrated (USTI), the new solution for high performance distributed block storage ...

Existing Northern Data bitcoin mining customer expands contract volume by more than 200 MW ...

Power XL Pro launched as new professional server based on AMD EPYC technology ...

Swinburne-led research team demonstrates world's fastest optical neuromorphic processor ...

Applications

Supercomputer models describe chloride's role in corrosion ...

HPC-AI Advisory Council to host HPC AI AC Conference in Japan on January, 26 ...

Insights through atomic simulation ...

Advanced materials in a snap ...

New data-driven global climate model provides projections for urban environments ...

Frequency data for stable power supply ...

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders ...

UTSA Artificial Intelligence Consortium receives over $1 million in research funding ...

Entangling electrons with heat ...

NIO partners with NVIDIA to develop a new generation of automated driving electric vehicles ...

Navantia leverages Ansys' digital transformation solutions to design next-gen naval vessels ...

Engineering graduate student places second in international research competition ...

The Cloud

Covid-19 genome sequencing project gets major upgrade ...

IBM provides Harris-Stowe State University with $2 million in Artificial Intelligence and open hybrid Cloud technology resources to help students build modern skills ...

IBM and Avertra collaborate to drive digital transformation for energy & utilities clients with IBM Cloud ...

UJET CCaaS Cloud contact centre now available on Oracle Cloud Marketplace ...