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Primeur weekly 2021-01-11

Exascale supercomputing

Preparing an earthquake risk assessment application for exascale ...

Quantum computing

A bit too much: reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing ...

The world's first integrated quantum communication network ...

Focus on Europe

GBP 20 million funding boost for science supercomputer will drive science simulation and UK-wide innovation ...

Northern Data acquires data centre site in Northern Sweden fully powered by green energy ...

Research and Markets to issue report on High Performance Computing (HPC) Market by Component, Deployment Type, Organization Size, Server Prices Band, Application Area, and Region - Global Forecast to 2025 ...

Environmental researchers benefit from powerful supercomputer at Plymouth Marine Laboratory ...

Middleware

XSEDE welcomes new service providers ...

Hardware

IBM appoints Gary D. Cohn as Vice Chairman ...

IBM appoints Martin Schroeter as CEO of "NewCo" independent managed infrastructure services business to spin out from IBM ...

Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing ...

E4 Computer Engineering announces University of Pisa as the first customer of Ultrafast Storage, Totally Integrated (USTI), the new solution for high performance distributed block storage ...

Existing Northern Data bitcoin mining customer expands contract volume by more than 200 MW ...

Power XL Pro launched as new professional server based on AMD EPYC technology ...

Swinburne-led research team demonstrates world's fastest optical neuromorphic processor ...

Applications

Supercomputer models describe chloride's role in corrosion ...

HPC-AI Advisory Council to host HPC AI AC Conference in Japan on January, 26 ...

Insights through atomic simulation ...

Advanced materials in a snap ...

New data-driven global climate model provides projections for urban environments ...

Frequency data for stable power supply ...

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders ...

UTSA Artificial Intelligence Consortium receives over $1 million in research funding ...

Entangling electrons with heat ...

NIO partners with NVIDIA to develop a new generation of automated driving electric vehicles ...

Navantia leverages Ansys' digital transformation solutions to design next-gen naval vessels ...

Engineering graduate student places second in international research competition ...

The Cloud

Covid-19 genome sequencing project gets major upgrade ...

IBM provides Harris-Stowe State University with $2 million in Artificial Intelligence and open hybrid Cloud technology resources to help students build modern skills ...

IBM and Avertra collaborate to drive digital transformation for energy & utilities clients with IBM Cloud ...

UJET CCaaS Cloud contact centre now available on Oracle Cloud Marketplace ...

A bit too much: reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing


A method that can reduce the bit width of a quantum system called the Ising model to solve combinatorial optimization problems. Credit: Waseda University.
6 Jan 2021 Tokyo - Given a list of cities and the distances between each pair of cities, how do you determine the shortest route that visits each city exactly once and returns to the starting location? This famous problem is called the "traveling salesman problem" and is an example of a combinatorial optimization problem. Solving these problems using conventional computers can be very time-consuming, and special devices called "quantum annealers" have been created for this purpose.

Quantum annealers are designed to find the lowest energy state - or "ground state" - of what's known as an "Ising model". Such models are abstract representations of a quantum mechanical system involving interacting spins that are also influenced by external magnetic fields. In the late 90s, scientists found that combinatorial optimization problems could be formulated as Ising models, which in turn could be physically implemented in quantum annealers. To obtain the solution to a combinatorial optimization problem, one simply has to observe the ground state reached in its associated quantum annealer after a short time.

One of the biggest challenges in this process is the transformation of the "logical" Ising model into a physically implementable Ising model suitable for quantum annealing. Sometimes, the numerical values of the spin interactions or the external magnetic fields require a number of bits to represent them (bit width) too large for a physical system. This severely limits the versatility and applicability of quantum annealers to real world problems. Fortunately, in a recent study published inIEEE Transactions on Computers, scientists from Japan have tackled this issue. Based purely on mathematical theory, they developed a method by which a given logical Ising model can be transformed into an equivalent model with a desired bit width so as to make it "fit" a desired physical implementation.

Their approach consists in adding auxiliary spins to the Ising model for problematic interactions or magnetic fields in such a way that the ground state (solution) of the transformed model is the same as that of the original model while also requiring a lower bit width. The technique is relatively simple and completely guaranteed to produce an equivalent Ising model with the same solution as the original. "Our strategy is the world's first to efficiently and theoretically address the bit-width reduction problem in the spin interactions and magnetic field coefficients in Ising models", remarked Professor Nozomu Togawa from Waseda University, Japan, who led the study.

The scientists also put their method to the test in several experiments, which further confirmed its validity. Prof. Togawa has high hopes, and he concludes by saying: "The approach developed in this study will widen the applicability of quantum annealers and make them much more attractive for people dealing with not only physical Ising models but all kinds of combinatorial optimization problems. Such problems are common in cryptography, logistics, and artificial intelligence, among many other fields."

Daisuke Oku, Masashi Tawada, Shu Tanaka, and Nozomu Togawa are the authors of the paper titled " How to Reduce the Bit-width of an Ising Model by Adding Auxiliary Spins ", published inIEEE Transactions on Computers- DOI: 10.1109/TC.2020.3045112.

Source: Waseda University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2021-01-11

Exascale supercomputing

Preparing an earthquake risk assessment application for exascale ...

Quantum computing

A bit too much: reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing ...

The world's first integrated quantum communication network ...

Focus on Europe

GBP 20 million funding boost for science supercomputer will drive science simulation and UK-wide innovation ...

Northern Data acquires data centre site in Northern Sweden fully powered by green energy ...

Research and Markets to issue report on High Performance Computing (HPC) Market by Component, Deployment Type, Organization Size, Server Prices Band, Application Area, and Region - Global Forecast to 2025 ...

Environmental researchers benefit from powerful supercomputer at Plymouth Marine Laboratory ...

Middleware

XSEDE welcomes new service providers ...

Hardware

IBM appoints Gary D. Cohn as Vice Chairman ...

IBM appoints Martin Schroeter as CEO of "NewCo" independent managed infrastructure services business to spin out from IBM ...

Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing ...

E4 Computer Engineering announces University of Pisa as the first customer of Ultrafast Storage, Totally Integrated (USTI), the new solution for high performance distributed block storage ...

Existing Northern Data bitcoin mining customer expands contract volume by more than 200 MW ...

Power XL Pro launched as new professional server based on AMD EPYC technology ...

Swinburne-led research team demonstrates world's fastest optical neuromorphic processor ...

Applications

Supercomputer models describe chloride's role in corrosion ...

HPC-AI Advisory Council to host HPC AI AC Conference in Japan on January, 26 ...

Insights through atomic simulation ...

Advanced materials in a snap ...

New data-driven global climate model provides projections for urban environments ...

Frequency data for stable power supply ...

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders ...

UTSA Artificial Intelligence Consortium receives over $1 million in research funding ...

Entangling electrons with heat ...

NIO partners with NVIDIA to develop a new generation of automated driving electric vehicles ...

Navantia leverages Ansys' digital transformation solutions to design next-gen naval vessels ...

Engineering graduate student places second in international research competition ...

The Cloud

Covid-19 genome sequencing project gets major upgrade ...

IBM provides Harris-Stowe State University with $2 million in Artificial Intelligence and open hybrid Cloud technology resources to help students build modern skills ...

IBM and Avertra collaborate to drive digital transformation for energy & utilities clients with IBM Cloud ...

UJET CCaaS Cloud contact centre now available on Oracle Cloud Marketplace ...