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Primeur weekly 2018-01-22

Focus

European Commission explains why Joint Undertaking is well suited as legal instrument to help create EuroHPC ecosystem ...

Exascale supercomputing

Exascale architectures lead to greener and more advanced combustion systems ...

Call for Proposals: Aurora Early Science Programme expands to include data and learning projects ...

Quantum computing

HKU quantum physicist Dr. Giulio Chiribella receives Croucher Senior Research Fellowship 2018 ...

New input for quantum simulations ...

Focus on Europe

Eni boots up HPC4 and makes its computing system the world's most powerful in the industry ...

ONERA to install new supercomputer for aerospace research ...

Atos to deliver the most powerful supercomputer in Germany at Forschungszentrum Jülich ...

Hardware

Cray announces selected preliminary 2017 financial results ...

India's Ministry of Earth Sciences deploys new Cray XC40 supercomputers and Cray storage systems ...

University of Virginia Engineering tapped to lead $27.5 million centre to reinvent computing ...

Asperitas creates AsperitasEI business unit to bring circular energy and data centre projects to life ...

CSRA selects edge solutions and Supermicro computer for expansion, increasing NASA computing capacity to 5 petaFLOPS ...

Mellanox ConnectX-5 Ethernet adapter wins Linley Group Analyst Choice Award for Best Networking Chip ...

Notre Dame to lead $26 million multi-university research centre developing next-generation computing technologies ...

New $32 million centre at University of Michigan reimagines how computers are designed ...

New C-BRIC centre will tackle brain-inspired computing ...

Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computing ...

Applications

US DOE announces funding for new HPC4Manufacturing industry projects ...

NOAA kicks off 2018 with massive supercomputer upgrade ...

UMass Center for Data Science partners with Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to accelerate science and medicine ...

Himawari-8 data assimilated simulation enables 10-minute updates of rain and flood predictions ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center to host free webinar on innovative web-based HPC portal ...

2D tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulator ...

Uncovering decades of questionable investments ...

Groundbreaking conference examines how AI transforms our world ...

Framework for Research Data Management makes life simpler for researchers ...

The Cloud

New centre headquartered at Carnegie Mellon will build smarter networks to connect edge devices to the Cloud ...

IBM and Salesforce strengthen strategic partnership ...

ANSYS and Rescale offer on-demand, pay-per-use ANSYS software on Rescale's ScaleX Cloud HPC platform ...

Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computing


Illustration of a voltage-induced memory effect in monolayer nanomaterials, which layer to create 'atomristors', the thinnest memory storage device that could lead to faster, smaller and smarter computer chips. Credit: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin.
17 Jan 2018 Austin - Engineers worldwide have been developing alternative ways to provide greater memory storage capacity on even smaller computer chips. Previous research into two-dimensional atomic sheets for memory storage has failed to uncover their potential - until now.

A team of electrical engineers at the University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with Peking University scientists, has developed the thinnest memory storage device with dense memory capacity, paving the way for faster, smaller and smarter computer chips for everything from consumer electronics to Big Data to brain-inspired computing.

"For a long time, the consensus was that it wasn't possible to make memory devices from materials that were only one atomic layer thick", stated Deji Akinwande, associate professor in the Cockrell School of Engineering's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. "With our new 'atomristors', we have shown it is indeed possible."

Made from 2D nanomaterials, the "atomristors" - a term Deji Akinwande coined - improve upon memristors, an emerging memory storage technology with lower memory scalability. He and his team published their findings in the January issue of Nano Letters .

"Atomristors will allow for the advancement of Moore's Law at the system level by enabling the 3D integration of nanoscale memory with nanoscale transistors on the same chip for advanced computing systems", Deji Akinwande stated.

Memory storage and transistors have, to date, always been separate components on a microchip, but atomristors combine both functions on a single, more efficient computer system. By using metallic atomic sheets (graphene) as electrodes and semiconducting atomic sheets (molybdenum sulfide) as the active layer, the entire memory cell is a sandwich about 1.5 nanometers thick, which makes it possible to densely pack atomristors layer by layer in a plane. This is a substantial advantage over conventional flash memory, which occupies far larger space. In addition, the thinness allows for faster and more efficient electric current flow.

Given their size, capacity and integration flexibility, atomristors can be packed together to make advanced 3D chips that are crucial to the successful development of brain-inspired computing. One of the greatest challenges in this burgeoning field of engineering is how to make a memory architecture with 3D connections akin to those found in the human brain.

"The sheer density of memory storage that can be made possible by layering these synthetic atomic sheets onto each other, coupled with integrated transistor design, means we can potentially make computers that learn and remember the same way our brains do", Deji Akinwande stated.

The research team also discovered another unique application for the technology. In existing ubiquitous devices such as smartphones and tablets, radio frequency switches are used to connect incoming signals from the antenna to one of the many wireless communication bands in order for different parts of a device to communicate and cooperate with one another. This activity can significantly affect a smartphone's battery life.

The atomristors are the smallest radio frequency memory switches to be demonstrated with no DC battery consumption, which can ultimately lead to longer battery life.

"Overall, we feel that this discovery has real commercialization value as it won't disrupt existing technologies", Deji Akinwande stated. "Rather, it has been designed to complement and integrate with the silicon chips already in use in modern tech devices."

Funding for the UT Austin team's work was provided by the National Science Foundation and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, which Deji Akinwande was awarded in 2015.

Source: University of Texas at Austin

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-01-22

Focus

European Commission explains why Joint Undertaking is well suited as legal instrument to help create EuroHPC ecosystem ...

Exascale supercomputing

Exascale architectures lead to greener and more advanced combustion systems ...

Call for Proposals: Aurora Early Science Programme expands to include data and learning projects ...

Quantum computing

HKU quantum physicist Dr. Giulio Chiribella receives Croucher Senior Research Fellowship 2018 ...

New input for quantum simulations ...

Focus on Europe

Eni boots up HPC4 and makes its computing system the world's most powerful in the industry ...

ONERA to install new supercomputer for aerospace research ...

Atos to deliver the most powerful supercomputer in Germany at Forschungszentrum Jülich ...

Hardware

Cray announces selected preliminary 2017 financial results ...

India's Ministry of Earth Sciences deploys new Cray XC40 supercomputers and Cray storage systems ...

University of Virginia Engineering tapped to lead $27.5 million centre to reinvent computing ...

Asperitas creates AsperitasEI business unit to bring circular energy and data centre projects to life ...

CSRA selects edge solutions and Supermicro computer for expansion, increasing NASA computing capacity to 5 petaFLOPS ...

Mellanox ConnectX-5 Ethernet adapter wins Linley Group Analyst Choice Award for Best Networking Chip ...

Notre Dame to lead $26 million multi-university research centre developing next-generation computing technologies ...

New $32 million centre at University of Michigan reimagines how computers are designed ...

New C-BRIC centre will tackle brain-inspired computing ...

Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computing ...

Applications

US DOE announces funding for new HPC4Manufacturing industry projects ...

NOAA kicks off 2018 with massive supercomputer upgrade ...

UMass Center for Data Science partners with Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to accelerate science and medicine ...

Himawari-8 data assimilated simulation enables 10-minute updates of rain and flood predictions ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center to host free webinar on innovative web-based HPC portal ...

2D tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulator ...

Uncovering decades of questionable investments ...

Groundbreaking conference examines how AI transforms our world ...

Framework for Research Data Management makes life simpler for researchers ...

The Cloud

New centre headquartered at Carnegie Mellon will build smarter networks to connect edge devices to the Cloud ...

IBM and Salesforce strengthen strategic partnership ...

ANSYS and Rescale offer on-demand, pay-per-use ANSYS software on Rescale's ScaleX Cloud HPC platform ...