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Primeur weekly 2018-01-29

Focus

European Commission explains why Joint Undertaking is well suited as legal instrument to help create EuroHPC ecosystem ...

Combination of top-down initiatives like EuroHPC and bottom-up science driven projects make European exascale effort healthy ...

Quantum computing

Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chip ...

Quantum control: Scientists develop quantum metamaterial from complex twin qubits ...

New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computing ...

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2D material ...

Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trust ...

Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computer ...

Focus on Europe

EOSC-hub to launch integrated services for the European Open Science Cloud ...

Supercomputing Frontiers Europe 2018 launches invitation to participate ...

CESNET and GÉANT deploy 300 Gbps wavelength in R&E community ...

PRACE SHAPE Programme supports two further SMEs ...

Hardware

Most powerful Dutch GPU supercomputer boosts new radio telescope ...

Asetek receives order from Fujitsu for Institute of Fluid Science at Tohoku University ...

Applications

Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication ...

NIST's superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains' ...

Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wet ...

UNSW Sydney scientist Michelle Simmons is Australian of the Year ...

San Diego County invests in new UC San Diego fire detection networking ...

Solving science and engineering problems with supercomputers and AI ...

Purdue-affiliated start-up designing next-generation hardware, software to propel computer intelligence to next level ...

Scientists pioneer use of deep learning for real-time gravitational wave discovery ...

Dynaslum research team publishes in Nature Scientific Data ...

University of Texas at Arlington researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials for space shuttles ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center helping Ohio University researcher revolutionize drug discovery with RNA in the spotlight ...

Cells of three aggressive cancers annihilated by drug-like compounds that reverse chemo failure ...

Sensor the size of a nitrogen atom investigates hard drives ...

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2D material


25 Jan 2018 Delft - Spintronics in materials of just a few atoms thick is an emerging field in which the 'spin' of electrons is used to process data, rather than the charge. Unfortunately, the spin only lasts for a very short time, making it - as yet - difficult to exploit in electronics. Researchers from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at TU Delft, working with the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research's AMOLF institute, have now found a way to convert the spin information into a predictable light signal at room temperature. The discovery brings the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics closer together and might lead to the development of an energy-efficient way of processing data, in data centres, for example. The researchers have given an account of their results inScience.

Kobus Kuipers describes a way to convert spin information into a predictable light signal in a 2D material. This discovery, which works at room temperature, brings together the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics, and may lead to 'green ICT', for example energy-efficient ways of processing data.

The research revolved around a nano-construction consisting of two components: an extremely thin silver thread, and a 2D material called tungsten disulfide. The researchers attached the silver thread to a slice of tungsten disulfide measuring just four atoms in thickness. Using circularly polarised light, they created what are known as 'excitons' with a specific rotational direction. The direction of that spin could be intitialized using the rotational direction of the laser light.

Excitons are actually electrons that have bounced out of their orbit. With this technique, the laser beam ensures that the electrons are launched into a wider orbit around a positively charged 'hole', in much the same way as a hydrogen atom. The excitons thus created want to return to their original state. On their return to the smaller orbit, they emit an energy package in the form of light. This light contains the spin information, but it emitted in all directions.

To enable the spin information to be put to use, the Delft researchers returned to an earlier discovery. They had shown that when light moves along a nanowire, it is accompanied by a rotating electromagnetic field very close to the wire: it spins clockwise on one side of the wire, and anti-clockwise on the other side. When the light moves in the opposite direction, the spin directions change too. So the local rotational direction of the electromagnetic field is locked one-to-one to the direction with which the light travels along the wire. "We use this phenomenon as a type of lock combination", explained Kobus Kuipers. "An exciton with a particular rotational direction can only emit light along the thread if the two rotational directions correspond."

And so a direct link is created between the spin information and the propagation direction of the light along the nanowire. It works almost perfectly: the spin information is 'launched' in the right direction along the thread in 90% of cases. In this way, fragile spin information can be carefully converted into a light signal and transported over far greater distances. Thanks to this technique, which works at room temperature, you can easily make new opto-electronic circuitry. Kobus Kuipers stated: "You don't need a stream of electrons, and no heat is released. This makes it a very low-energy way of transferring information."

The discovery clears the way for combining the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics. Kobus Kuipers stated: "This combination may well result in green information processing strategies at the nanoscale."

The paper titled " Nanoscale chiral valley-photon interface through optical spin-orbit coupling " is authored by Su-Hyun Gong, Filippo Alpeggiani, Beniamino Sciacca, Erik C. Garnett, and L. Kuipers - DOI:10.1126/science.aan8010.
Source: Technical University of Delft

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-01-29

Focus

European Commission explains why Joint Undertaking is well suited as legal instrument to help create EuroHPC ecosystem ...

Combination of top-down initiatives like EuroHPC and bottom-up science driven projects make European exascale effort healthy ...

Quantum computing

Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chip ...

Quantum control: Scientists develop quantum metamaterial from complex twin qubits ...

New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computing ...

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2D material ...

Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trust ...

Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computer ...

Focus on Europe

EOSC-hub to launch integrated services for the European Open Science Cloud ...

Supercomputing Frontiers Europe 2018 launches invitation to participate ...

CESNET and GÉANT deploy 300 Gbps wavelength in R&E community ...

PRACE SHAPE Programme supports two further SMEs ...

Hardware

Most powerful Dutch GPU supercomputer boosts new radio telescope ...

Asetek receives order from Fujitsu for Institute of Fluid Science at Tohoku University ...

Applications

Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication ...

NIST's superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains' ...

Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wet ...

UNSW Sydney scientist Michelle Simmons is Australian of the Year ...

San Diego County invests in new UC San Diego fire detection networking ...

Solving science and engineering problems with supercomputers and AI ...

Purdue-affiliated start-up designing next-generation hardware, software to propel computer intelligence to next level ...

Scientists pioneer use of deep learning for real-time gravitational wave discovery ...

Dynaslum research team publishes in Nature Scientific Data ...

University of Texas at Arlington researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials for space shuttles ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center helping Ohio University researcher revolutionize drug discovery with RNA in the spotlight ...

Cells of three aggressive cancers annihilated by drug-like compounds that reverse chemo failure ...

Sensor the size of a nitrogen atom investigates hard drives ...