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Primeur weekly 2018-01-29

Focus

European Commission explains why Joint Undertaking is well suited as legal instrument to help create EuroHPC ecosystem ...

Combination of top-down initiatives like EuroHPC and bottom-up science driven projects make European exascale effort healthy ...

Quantum computing

Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chip ...

Quantum control: Scientists develop quantum metamaterial from complex twin qubits ...

New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computing ...

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2D material ...

Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trust ...

Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computer ...

Focus on Europe

EOSC-hub to launch integrated services for the European Open Science Cloud ...

Supercomputing Frontiers Europe 2018 launches invitation to participate ...

CESNET and GÉANT deploy 300 Gbps wavelength in R&E community ...

PRACE SHAPE Programme supports two further SMEs ...

Hardware

Most powerful Dutch GPU supercomputer boosts new radio telescope ...

Asetek receives order from Fujitsu for Institute of Fluid Science at Tohoku University ...

Applications

Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication ...

NIST's superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains' ...

Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wet ...

UNSW Sydney scientist Michelle Simmons is Australian of the Year ...

San Diego County invests in new UC San Diego fire detection networking ...

Solving science and engineering problems with supercomputers and AI ...

Purdue-affiliated start-up designing next-generation hardware, software to propel computer intelligence to next level ...

Scientists pioneer use of deep learning for real-time gravitational wave discovery ...

Dynaslum research team publishes in Nature Scientific Data ...

University of Texas at Arlington researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials for space shuttles ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center helping Ohio University researcher revolutionize drug discovery with RNA in the spotlight ...

Cells of three aggressive cancers annihilated by drug-like compounds that reverse chemo failure ...

Sensor the size of a nitrogen atom investigates hard drives ...

Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication


Illinois mechanical science and engineering student and lead author of a new study Benjamin Sohn holds a device that uses sound waves to produce optical diodes tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer.
22 Jan 2018 Urbana-Champaign - Illinois researchers have demonstrated that sound waves can be used to produce ultraminiature optical diodes that are tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. These devices, called optical isolators, may help solve major data capacity and system size challenges for photonic integrated circuits, the light-based equivalent of electronic circuits, which are used for computing and communications.

Isolators are nonreciprocal or "one-way" devices similar to electronic diodes. They protect laser sources from back reflections and are necessary for routing light signals around optical networks. Today, the dominant technology for producing such nonreciprocal devices requires materials that change their optical properties in response to magnetic fields, the researchers said.

"There are several problems with using magnetically responsive materials to achieve the one-way flow of light in a photonic chip", stated mechanical science and engineering professor and co-author of the study Gaurav Bahl. "First, industry simply does not have good capability to place compact magnets on a chip. But more importantly, the necessary materials are not yet available in photonics foundries. That is why industry desperately needs a better approach that uses only conventional materials and avoids magnetic fields altogether."

In a study published in the journalNature Photonics, the researchers explain how they use the minuscule coupling between light and sound to provide a unique solution that enables nonreciprocal devices with nearly any photonic material.

However, the physical size of the device and the availability of materials are not the only problems with the current state of the art, the researchers said.

"Laboratory attempts at producing compact magnetic optical isolators have always been plagued by large optical loss", stated graduate student and lead author Benjamin Sohn. "The photonics industry cannot afford this material-related loss and also needs a solution that provides enough bandwidth to be comparable to the traditional magnetic technique. Until now, there has been no magnetless approach that is competitive."

The new device is only 200 by 100 microns in size - about 10,000 times smaller than a centimeter squared - and made of aluminum nitride, a transparent material that transmits light and is compatible with photonics foundries. "Sound waves are produced in a way similar to a piezo-electric speaker, using tiny electrodes written directly onto the aluminum nitride with an electron beam. It is these sound waves that compel light within the device to travel only in one direction. This is the first time that a magnetless isolator has surpassed gigahertz bandwidth", Benjamin Sohn stated.

The researchers are looking for ways to increase bandwidth or data capacity of these isolators and are confident that they can overcome this hurdle. Once perfected, they envision transformative applications in photonic communication systems, gyroscopes, GPS systems, atomic timekeeping and data centres.

"Data centres handle enormous amounts of internet data traffic and consume large amounts of power for networking and for keeping the servers cool", Gaurav Bahl stated. "Light-based communication is desirable because it produces much less heat, meaning that much less energy can be spent on server cooling while transmitting a lot more data per second."

Aside from the technological potential, the researchers can't help but be mesmerized by the fundamental science behind this advancement.

"In everyday life, we don't see the interactions of light with sound", Gaurav Bahl stated. "Light can pass through a transparent pane of glass without doing anything strange. Our field of research has found that light and sound do, in fact, interact in a very subtle way. If you apply the right engineering principles, you can shake a transparent material in just the right way to enhance these effects and solve this major scientific challenge. It seems almost magical."

The United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Air Force Research Laboratory supported this research.

The paper " Time-reversal symmetry breaking with acoustic pumping of nanophotonic circuits " is available online.

Source: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2018-01-29

Focus

European Commission explains why Joint Undertaking is well suited as legal instrument to help create EuroHPC ecosystem ...

Combination of top-down initiatives like EuroHPC and bottom-up science driven projects make European exascale effort healthy ...

Quantum computing

Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chip ...

Quantum control: Scientists develop quantum metamaterial from complex twin qubits ...

New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computing ...

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2D material ...

Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trust ...

Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computer ...

Focus on Europe

EOSC-hub to launch integrated services for the European Open Science Cloud ...

Supercomputing Frontiers Europe 2018 launches invitation to participate ...

CESNET and GÉANT deploy 300 Gbps wavelength in R&E community ...

PRACE SHAPE Programme supports two further SMEs ...

Hardware

Most powerful Dutch GPU supercomputer boosts new radio telescope ...

Asetek receives order from Fujitsu for Institute of Fluid Science at Tohoku University ...

Applications

Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication ...

NIST's superconducting synapse may be missing piece for 'artificial brains' ...

Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wet ...

UNSW Sydney scientist Michelle Simmons is Australian of the Year ...

San Diego County invests in new UC San Diego fire detection networking ...

Solving science and engineering problems with supercomputers and AI ...

Purdue-affiliated start-up designing next-generation hardware, software to propel computer intelligence to next level ...

Scientists pioneer use of deep learning for real-time gravitational wave discovery ...

Dynaslum research team publishes in Nature Scientific Data ...

University of Texas at Arlington researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials for space shuttles ...

Ohio Supercomputer Center helping Ohio University researcher revolutionize drug discovery with RNA in the spotlight ...

Cells of three aggressive cancers annihilated by drug-like compounds that reverse chemo failure ...

Sensor the size of a nitrogen atom investigates hard drives ...