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Primeur weekly 2017-01-23

Exascale supercomputing

China plans to develop powerful exascale computer ...

HiPEAC Vision 2017 finds it is 'time to reinvent computing' ...

Richard Gerber tapped to oversee NERSC's High Performance Computing Department ...

NERSC's first 'NESAP for Data' teams hit the ground running ...

ORNL plays key role in Exascale Computing Project's first year ...

Quantum computing

Seeing the quantum future... literally ...

Focus on Europe

At the vanguard of European computing systems: HiPEAC17 ...

PRACE to offer MOOCs via Future Learn ...

PRACE Summer of HPC 2017 opens for applications ...

Hardware

Hartree Centre to take delivery of powerful new generation supercomputer ...

Indiana University and international partners light 100G transatlantic link over Aqua Comms' AEConnect subsea cable ...

Nanyang Technological University and German scientists turn memory chips into processors to speed up computing tasks ...

Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens ...

Supercomputer market to be driven by the development of smart cities through 2021, says Technavio ...

DDN and China-based Inspur sign landmark HPC joint sales and marketing agreement ...

GW4 joins industry partners to develop 'first of its kind' supercomputer ...

Automotive safety hypervisor announced for ARM Cortex-R52 ...

Eastern Mediterranean spurred on by EUMEDCONNECT3 project extension and Lebanon capacity upgrade ...

Applications

King Faisal Prize for Würzburg physicist ...

Largest Populus SNP dataset holds promise for biofuels, materials, and metabolites ...

Glass's off-kilter harmonies: New modelling method focuses attention on amorphous material's unusual vibrational modes ...

Basel physicist Daniel Loss receives the King Faisal International Prize ...

Protein research: the computer as microscope ...

Teaching computers to recognize unhealthy guts ...

2017 International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences to be organized in Boulder, Colorado ...

Diamond shines in molecular dynamics simulations ...

The Cloud

Oracle Cloud Platform expands to help more organisations build and deploy high-performance applications ...

Altair to offer HPC Cloud solutions on Oracle Cloud Platform ...

Oracle buys Apiary ...

Oracle expands Cloud services globally with three new regions in North America and EMEA ...

HPE to acquire SimpliVity and expand leadership in growing hybrid IT industry ...

U.S. Army enlists IBM for $62 million Cloud deal ...

Seeing the quantum future... literally


Trapped Ytterbium ions were used as one of the most advanced laboratory quantum systems for this study. Professor Biercuk's research laboratories are now located in the Sydney Nanoscience Hub, after six years as a visiting scientist at the National Measurement Institute. Credit: University of Sydney.
14 Jan 2017 Sydney - Scientists at the University of Sydney have demonstrated the ability to "see" the future of quantum systems, and used that knowledge to pre-empt their demise, in a major achievement that could help bring the strange and powerful world of quantum technology closer to reality.

The applications of quantum-enabled technologies are compelling and already demonstrating significant impacts - especially in the realm of sensing and metrology. And the potential to build exceptionally powerful quantum computers using quantum bits, or qubits, is driving investment from the world's largest companies.

However a significant obstacle to building reliable quantum technologies has been the randomisation of quantum systems by their environments, or decoherence, which effectively destroys the useful quantum character.

The physicists have taken a technical quantum leap in addressing this, using techniques from Big Data to predict how quantum systems will change and then preventing the system's breakdown from occurring.

The research is published in Nature Communications .

"Much the way the individual components in mobile phones will eventually fail, so too do quantum systems", stated the paper's senior author Professor Michael J. Biercuk. "But in quantum technology the lifetime is generally measured in fractions of a second, rather than years."

Professor Biercuk, from the University of Sydney's School of Physics and a chief investigator at the Australian Research Council's Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, said his group had demonstrated it was possible to suppress decoherence in a preventive manner. The key was to develop a technique to predict how the system would disintegrate.

Professor Biercuk highlighted the challenges of making predictions in a quantum world: "Humans routinely employ predictive techniques in our daily experience; for instance, when we play tennis we predict where the ball will end up based on observations of the airborne ball", he stated.

"This works because the rules that govern how the ball will move, like gravity, are regular and known. But what if the rules changed randomly while the ball was on its way to you? In that case it's next to impossible to predict the future behaviour of that ball."

"And yet this situation is exactly what we had to deal with because the disintegration of quantum systems is random. Moreover, in the quantum realm observation erases quantumness, so our team needed to be able to guess how and when the system would randomly break. We effectively needed to swing at the randomly moving tennis ball while blindfolded."

The team turned to machine learning for help in keeping their quantum systems - qubits realised in trapped atoms - from breaking.

What might look like random behaviour actually contained enough information for a computer programme to guess how the system would change in the future. It could then predict the future without direct observation, which would otherwise erase the system's useful characteristics.

The predictions were remarkably accurate, allowing the team to use their guesses preemptively to compensate for the anticipated changes.

Doing this in real time allowed the team to prevent the disintegration of the quantum character, extending the useful lifetime of the qubits.

"We know that building real quantum technologies will require major advances in our ability to control and stabilise qubits - to make them useful in applications", Professor Biercuk stated.

Our techniques apply to any qubit, built in any technology, including the special superconducting circuits being used by major corporations.

"We're excited to be developing new capabilities that turn quantum systems from novelties into useful technologies. The quantum future is looking better all the time", Professor Biercuk stated.

Source: University of Sydney

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-01-23

Exascale supercomputing

China plans to develop powerful exascale computer ...

HiPEAC Vision 2017 finds it is 'time to reinvent computing' ...

Richard Gerber tapped to oversee NERSC's High Performance Computing Department ...

NERSC's first 'NESAP for Data' teams hit the ground running ...

ORNL plays key role in Exascale Computing Project's first year ...

Quantum computing

Seeing the quantum future... literally ...

Focus on Europe

At the vanguard of European computing systems: HiPEAC17 ...

PRACE to offer MOOCs via Future Learn ...

PRACE Summer of HPC 2017 opens for applications ...

Hardware

Hartree Centre to take delivery of powerful new generation supercomputer ...

Indiana University and international partners light 100G transatlantic link over Aqua Comms' AEConnect subsea cable ...

Nanyang Technological University and German scientists turn memory chips into processors to speed up computing tasks ...

Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens ...

Supercomputer market to be driven by the development of smart cities through 2021, says Technavio ...

DDN and China-based Inspur sign landmark HPC joint sales and marketing agreement ...

GW4 joins industry partners to develop 'first of its kind' supercomputer ...

Automotive safety hypervisor announced for ARM Cortex-R52 ...

Eastern Mediterranean spurred on by EUMEDCONNECT3 project extension and Lebanon capacity upgrade ...

Applications

King Faisal Prize for Würzburg physicist ...

Largest Populus SNP dataset holds promise for biofuels, materials, and metabolites ...

Glass's off-kilter harmonies: New modelling method focuses attention on amorphous material's unusual vibrational modes ...

Basel physicist Daniel Loss receives the King Faisal International Prize ...

Protein research: the computer as microscope ...

Teaching computers to recognize unhealthy guts ...

2017 International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences to be organized in Boulder, Colorado ...

Diamond shines in molecular dynamics simulations ...

The Cloud

Oracle Cloud Platform expands to help more organisations build and deploy high-performance applications ...

Altair to offer HPC Cloud solutions on Oracle Cloud Platform ...

Oracle buys Apiary ...

Oracle expands Cloud services globally with three new regions in North America and EMEA ...

HPE to acquire SimpliVity and expand leadership in growing hybrid IT industry ...

U.S. Army enlists IBM for $62 million Cloud deal ...