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Primeur weekly 2015-01-19

The Cloud

IBM opens first Cloud centre in Mexico ...

Desktop Grids

7th International Workshop on Science Gateways to issue Call for Papers ...

University of Westminster in search of two Research Associates for European CloudSME project ...

EuroFlash

Gridwise acquired by Red Stack Tech ...

PRACE to collaborate with Women in HPC on camera and cover ...

Michael M. Resch was awarded title of professor honoris causa ...

ANSYS partners With Leading European Supercomputing Center ...

Horizon 2020 - Call 2 Information Day and Networking event for 'Future Internet' ...

Calibre releases new LEDView325DS digital signage LED videowall scaler ...

Shaping the Future of Digital Social Innovation in Europe ...

Bright Computing is chosen to manage the world's most powerful supercomputer dedicated to life sciences research ...

1000th researcher subscribed to TraIT platform ...

GEANT Association signs contract with new Certificate Authority ...

Bright Computing boosts investment in EMEA ...

Galactic 'hailstorm' in the early universe ...

USFlash

Atomic placement of elements counts for strong concrete ...

Supercomputing Frontiers 2015 Conference to issue Call for Participation ...

IDC MarketScape names DataDirect Networks a leader in object-based storage market ...

IBM launches z13 mainframe ...

ANSYS power noise and reliability solutions adopted by Fujitsu for high-performance processor designs ...

RDA/US and CENDI announce partnership to promote innovations in data sharing and exchange ...

New report says no technological replacement exists for bulk data collection ...

Rice-sized laser, powered one electron at a time, bodes well for quantum computing ...

Shining a light on quantum dots measurement ...

New analyst report cites IBM as the leading Hadoop provider among developers ...

Atomic placement of elements counts for strong concrete


8 Jan 2015 Houston - Even when building big, every atom matters, according to new research on particle-based materials at Rice University. Rice researchers Rouzbeh Shahsavari and Saroosh Jalilvand have published a study showing what happens at the nanoscale when "structurally complex" materials like concrete - a random jumble of elements rather than an ordered crystal - rub against each other. The scratches they leave behind can say a lot about their characteristics.

The researchers are the first to run sophisticated calculations that show how atomic-level forces affect the mechanical properties of a complex particle-based material. Their techniques suggest new ways to fine-tune the chemistry of such materials to make them less prone to cracking and more suitable for specific applications.

The research appears in the American Chemical Society journalApplied Materials and Interfaces.

The study used calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), also known as cement, as a model particulate system. Rouzbeh Shahsavari became quite familiar with C-S-H while participating in construction of the first atomic-scale models of the material.

C-S-H is the glue that binds the small rocks, gravel and sand in concrete. Though it looks like a paste before hardening, it consists of discrete nanoscale particles. The van der Waals and Coulombic forces that influence the interactions between the C-S-H and the larger particles are the key to the material's overall strength and fracture properties, said Rouzbeh Shahsavari. He decided to take a close look at those and other nanoscale mechanisms.

"Classical studies of friction on materials have been around for centuries", he stated. "It is known that if you make a surface rough, friction is going to increase. That’s a common technique in industry to prevent sliding: Rough surfaces block each other. What we discovered is that, besides those common mechanical roughening techniques, modulation of surface chemistry, which is less intuitive, can significantly affect the friction and thus the mechanical properties of the particulate system."

Rouzbeh Shahsavari said it's a misconception that the bulk amount of a single element - for example, calcium in C-S-H - directly controls the mechanical properties of a particulate system. "We found that what controls properties inside particles could be completely different from what controls their surface interactions", he stated. While more calcium content at the surface would improve friction and thus the strength of the assembly, lower calcium content would benefit the strength of individual particles.

"This may seem contradictory, but it suggests that to achieve optimum mechanical properties for a particle system, new synthetic and processing conditions must be devised to place the elements in the right places", he stated.

The researchers also found the contribution of natural van der Waals attraction between molecules to be far more significant than Coulombic (electrostatic) forces in C-S-H. That, too, was primarily due to calcium, Rouzbeh Shahsavari said.

To test their theories, Rouzbeh Shahsavari and Saroosh Jalilvand built computer models of rough C-S-H and smooth tobermorite. They dragged a virtual tip of the former across the top of the latter, scratching the surface to see how hard they would have to push its atoms to displace them. Their scratch simulations allowed them to decode the key forces and mechanics involved as well as to predict the inherent fracture toughness of tobermorite, numbers borne out by others' experiments.

Rouzbeh Shahsavari said atomic-level analysis could help improve a broad range of non-crystalline materials, including ceramics, sands, powders, grains and colloids.

Saroosh Jalilvand is a former graduate student in Rouzbeh Shahsavari's group at Rice and is now a Ph.D. student at University College Dublin. Rouzbeh Shahsavari is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and of materials science and nanoengineering and a member of the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology at Rice.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) supported the research. Supercomputer resources were provided by the National Institutes of Health and an IBM Shared University Research Award in partnership with CISCO, Qlogic and Adaptive Computing, and the NSF-funded Data Analysis and Visualization Cyber Infrastructure administered by Rice's Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology.

You can read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/am506411h .
Source: Rice University

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2015-01-19

The Cloud

IBM opens first Cloud centre in Mexico ...

Desktop Grids

7th International Workshop on Science Gateways to issue Call for Papers ...

University of Westminster in search of two Research Associates for European CloudSME project ...

EuroFlash

Gridwise acquired by Red Stack Tech ...

PRACE to collaborate with Women in HPC on camera and cover ...

Michael M. Resch was awarded title of professor honoris causa ...

ANSYS partners With Leading European Supercomputing Center ...

Horizon 2020 - Call 2 Information Day and Networking event for 'Future Internet' ...

Calibre releases new LEDView325DS digital signage LED videowall scaler ...

Shaping the Future of Digital Social Innovation in Europe ...

Bright Computing is chosen to manage the world's most powerful supercomputer dedicated to life sciences research ...

1000th researcher subscribed to TraIT platform ...

GEANT Association signs contract with new Certificate Authority ...

Bright Computing boosts investment in EMEA ...

Galactic 'hailstorm' in the early universe ...

USFlash

Atomic placement of elements counts for strong concrete ...

Supercomputing Frontiers 2015 Conference to issue Call for Participation ...

IDC MarketScape names DataDirect Networks a leader in object-based storage market ...

IBM launches z13 mainframe ...

ANSYS power noise and reliability solutions adopted by Fujitsu for high-performance processor designs ...

RDA/US and CENDI announce partnership to promote innovations in data sharing and exchange ...

New report says no technological replacement exists for bulk data collection ...

Rice-sized laser, powered one electron at a time, bodes well for quantum computing ...

Shining a light on quantum dots measurement ...

New analyst report cites IBM as the leading Hadoop provider among developers ...