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Primeur weekly 2012-01-02

The Cloud

Hong Kong's Quality HealthCare adopt IBM Cloud and Analytics

Improving security in the Cloud

EuroFlash

T-Platforms to build 10 PetaFlops supercomputer

Award-winning Maximum Performance Computing (MPC) powers trading systems at J.P. Morgan

USFlash

Bright Computing and China HPC Technologies power astronomical research at China's Purple Mountain Observatory

Bright Computing Selected for HPC cluster at Texas A&M University

40-year-old puzzle of superstring theory solved by supercomputer

Virginia Tech's Wu Feng unveils HokieSpeed, a new powerful supercomputer for the masses

Lawrence Livermore receives $1.75 million to integrate more renewable sources into California's energy grid

A new kind of metal in the deep Earth

Compact personal supercomputer provides powerful GPU computing in a small package

Tokyo Institute of Technology wins Gordon Bell Prize with NVIDIA GPU-accelerated supercomputer

New device could bring optical information processing

Asiana Airlines improves business efficiency with Oracle Exadata Database Machine

Digicel Haiti implements Oracle Exadata Database Machine to help meet business objectives

Iowa Network Services improves services uptime and reduces data centre operational costs with Oracle Solaris

BNP Paribas CIB speeds information processing with Oracle Exadata Database Machine

Quantum computing has applications in magnetic imaging, according to Pitt researchers

Better turbine simulation software to yield better engines

Optical fiber innovation could make future optical computers a SNAP

Compact personal supercomputer provides powerful GPU computing in a small package

21 Dec 2011 Nashua - NextComputing, a provider of small form-factor workstations and servers, has made a new addition to its Nucleus family of compact workstations: the Nucleus GP. The Nucleus GP is a small form-factor, mini-tower workstation optimized for GP-GPU computing (General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units). This compact desktop supercomputer provides dense GPU processing, as well as traditional CPU processing, memory, and high-speed storage, into the smallest package available. This makes the Nucleus GP ideal for space-limited environments or for transporting systems among different locations such as large research facilities.

Using the GPU to accelerate complex computations, particularly those of a parallel nature, has been largely adopted become an accepted practice within academia, as well as government and commercial applications. GP-GPU computing is particularly mature in the areas of bioinformatics, medical imaging, and weather modelling, and has gained more recent widespread acceptance in computational finance, engineering simulation, intelligence encryption/decryption, and digital content creation.

Hardware used for this type of computing is usually limited to clusters of rack-mounted servers, or large desk-side tower workstations. However, there are many situations or environments where access to a cluster is not possible, and a traditional workstation is not practical. For example, research labs with multiple departments spread among different buildings may benefit from a GPU-enabled system that is more easily transported. Space-cramped offices like those sometimes found in converted lofts may benefit high-frequency trading groups. And application domain consultants working with clients around the globe may need to set up shop anywhere their services are needed. A desktop supercomputer that is easy to travel with may be essential to their businesses.

The Nucleus GP offers the same features of a high-end GPU workstation in a system that is around half the size and weight. This system features:

  • A compact and space-saving mini-tower chassis: 17.37" H x 16.75" W x 5.80" D
  • Support for up to three (3) dual-wide PCI Express 2.0 x16 GPUs such as NVIDIA Tesla C-class GPU computing processors or AMD FireStream compute accelerators
  • Quad- or Six-Core Intel Xeon or Core i7 processor, up to 3.06 GHz
  • Up to 24GB DDR3 1333 MHz memory
  • Up to (14) 2.5” SATA or SAS hard drives or SATA SSDs, depending on configuration
  • 1300W power supply redundant 2+1 hot-swappable power supply module
The Nucleus GP parallel computing workstation is available now from NextComputing and its authorized resellers.
Source: NextComputing

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2012-01-02

The Cloud

Hong Kong's Quality HealthCare adopt IBM Cloud and Analytics

Improving security in the Cloud

EuroFlash

T-Platforms to build 10 PetaFlops supercomputer

Award-winning Maximum Performance Computing (MPC) powers trading systems at J.P. Morgan

USFlash

Bright Computing and China HPC Technologies power astronomical research at China's Purple Mountain Observatory

Bright Computing Selected for HPC cluster at Texas A&M University

40-year-old puzzle of superstring theory solved by supercomputer

Virginia Tech's Wu Feng unveils HokieSpeed, a new powerful supercomputer for the masses

Lawrence Livermore receives $1.75 million to integrate more renewable sources into California's energy grid

A new kind of metal in the deep Earth

Compact personal supercomputer provides powerful GPU computing in a small package

Tokyo Institute of Technology wins Gordon Bell Prize with NVIDIA GPU-accelerated supercomputer

New device could bring optical information processing

Asiana Airlines improves business efficiency with Oracle Exadata Database Machine

Digicel Haiti implements Oracle Exadata Database Machine to help meet business objectives

Iowa Network Services improves services uptime and reduces data centre operational costs with Oracle Solaris

BNP Paribas CIB speeds information processing with Oracle Exadata Database Machine

Quantum computing has applications in magnetic imaging, according to Pitt researchers

Better turbine simulation software to yield better engines

Optical fiber innovation could make future optical computers a SNAP