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Primeur weekly 2017-12-04

Quantum computing

Simulating physics ...

Key component for quantum computing invented ...

Quantum-emitting answer might lie in the solution ...

Quantum systems correct themselves ...

NCSA SPIN intern Daniel Johnson published in Classical and Quantum Gravity ...

Focus on Europe

9th Irish Supercomputer List published ...

Gap between research and industry HPC in Ireland widens ...

SURFsara extends its status as Intel Parallel Computing Center for 2018 ...

EXDCI issues Call for Workshops for the European HPC Summit Week 2018 ...

Hardware

Supermicro introduces next-generation storage form factor with new Intel "Ruler" all-flash NVMe 1U server and JBOF ...

New director named at Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

AccelStor empowers all-flash array to advance genomics data analysis ...

New Storage 2020 report outlines vision for future HPC storage ...

Loci adds William Schrader, former PSINet Inc. CEO, to Advisory Board ...

Shantenu Jha named Chair of Brookhaven Lab's Center for Data-Driven Discovery ...

Applications

ORNL-designed algorithm leverages Titan to create high-performing deep neural networks ...

Drought-resistant plant genes could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops ...

HPE partners with Stephen Hawking's COSMOS Research Group and the Cambridge Faculty of Mathematics ...

Monopole current offers way to control magnets ...

70Gb/s optical intra-connects in data centers based on band-limited devices ...

Lobachevsky University scientists in search of fast algorithms for discrete optimization ...

High-Performance Computing cuts particle collision data prep time ...

TOP500

High performance computer MOGON II at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz among the 100 fastest supercomputers in the world ...

The Cloud

HPE unveils industryis first SaaS-based multi-Cloud management solution for on-premises and public Clouds ...

AccelStor revs up NeoSapphire all-flash array portfolio for next generation Cloud application ...

NCSA SPIN intern Daniel Johnson published in Classical and Quantum Gravity


This image shows the collision of two black holes with masses of 28 to 36 and 21 to 28 times the mass of the sun, respectively. The spheres at the centre represent the event horizons of the black holes. The size of the black holes has been increased by a factor of 4 to enhance visibility. Elevation and colour of the surface gives an indicating of the strength of the gravitational field at that point. Orange is strongest, dark blue is weakest. The collision happened between 1.1 to 2.2 billion light years from Earth, and was observed from a direction near the Eridanus constellation. The mass equivalent of 3 suns was converted to gravitational radiation and radiated into space. Authors: Numerical simulation: R. Haas, E. Huerta, University of Illinois; Visualization: R. Haas, University of Illinois.
30 Nov 2017 Urbana-Champaign - At the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), undergraduate SPIN - Students Pushing INnovation - intern Daniel Johnson joined NCSA's Gravity Group to study Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity, specifically numerical relativity. Daniel Johnson has used the open source, numerical relativity software, the Einstein Toolkit on the Blue Waters supercomputer to numerically solve Einstein's general relativity equations to study the collision of black holes, and the emission of gravitational waves from these astrophysical events. During his SPIN internship, Daniel developed an open source, Python package to streamline these numerical analyses in high performance computing (HPC) environments.

Just this month, Daniel Johnson's paper " Python Open Source Waveform Extractor (POWER): An open source, Python package to monitor and post-process numerical relativity simulations " was accepted byClassical and Quantum Gravity, a remarkable feat for an undergraduate student, and one that will benefit the numerical relativity community.

"With a long history of developing scientific software and tools, NCSA provides a rich environment where HPC experts, faculty, and students can work together to solve some of the most challenging problems facing us today", stated NCSA Director Bill Gropp. "This is a great example of what young researchers can accomplish when immersed in an exciting and supportive research programme."

"It's very gratifying to have an undergraduate's work published in a world-leading journal in relativity", stated Eliu Huerta, research scientist at NCSA who mentored Daniel Johnson. "Given the lack of open source tools to post-process the data products of these simulations in HPC environments, there was an opportunity for Daniel to create something that could be very useful to the numerical relativity community at large."

When Albert Einstein published his theory of general relativity in 1915, he probably couldn't have imagined its transformative impact across science domains, from mathematics to computer science and cosmology. Einstein would have been pleased to foresee that the advent of HPC would eventually allow detailed numerical studies of his theory, providing key insights into the physics of colliding neutron stars and black holes - the sources of gravitational waves that the LIGO - Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory - detectors observed for the first time on September 14, 2015, and which are now becoming routinely detected by ground-based gravitational wave detectors.

Daniel Johnson developed an open-source Python package that seeks to streamline the process of monitoring and post-processing the data products of large scale numerical relativity campaigns in HPC environments. This, in turn, will allow researchers an end-to-end infrastructure within the Einstein Toolkit where they can submit, monitor, and post-process numerical relativity simulations.

"This whole project came to be when we were trying to compute numerical relativity waveforms from a large dataset we had created with the Einstein Toolkit in Blue Waters", stated Daniel Johnson. "We realized it would be much more efficient if we could post-process numerical relativity simulations directly on Blue Waters without having to move the massive amounts of data to another environment. I was able to adapt existing code and functions to Python, and now we can post-process huge amounts of data more efficiently than before."

"It's become clear that open source software is a key component in most research today, and increasingly, researchers are coming to realize that it can be an intellectual contribution on its own, separate from any one research result, as can be seen in the fact thatClassical and Quantum Gravityaccepted this software paper", stated Daniel S. Katz, assistant director of Science Software and Applications at NCSA. "Young researchers like Daniel are pushing the limits of what open source software can do and then getting credit for their software, which is a victory for the entire science community."

The software Johnson developed, POWER, is an open-source Python package of great use to the larger numerical relativity community. It will lay the groundwork for future research and simulations on high performance computing systems across the globe.

"The SPIN programme allowed me to combine my interests in physics and computer science", stated author and SPIN Intern Daniel Johnson. "The SPIN programme provided me an avenue to learn about computational astrophysics, which is what I now plan to study in graduate school."
Source: National Center for Supercomputing Applications - NCSA

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2017-12-04

Quantum computing

Simulating physics ...

Key component for quantum computing invented ...

Quantum-emitting answer might lie in the solution ...

Quantum systems correct themselves ...

NCSA SPIN intern Daniel Johnson published in Classical and Quantum Gravity ...

Focus on Europe

9th Irish Supercomputer List published ...

Gap between research and industry HPC in Ireland widens ...

SURFsara extends its status as Intel Parallel Computing Center for 2018 ...

EXDCI issues Call for Workshops for the European HPC Summit Week 2018 ...

Hardware

Supermicro introduces next-generation storage form factor with new Intel "Ruler" all-flash NVMe 1U server and JBOF ...

New director named at Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

AccelStor empowers all-flash array to advance genomics data analysis ...

New Storage 2020 report outlines vision for future HPC storage ...

Loci adds William Schrader, former PSINet Inc. CEO, to Advisory Board ...

Shantenu Jha named Chair of Brookhaven Lab's Center for Data-Driven Discovery ...

Applications

ORNL-designed algorithm leverages Titan to create high-performing deep neural networks ...

Drought-resistant plant genes could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops ...

HPE partners with Stephen Hawking's COSMOS Research Group and the Cambridge Faculty of Mathematics ...

Monopole current offers way to control magnets ...

70Gb/s optical intra-connects in data centers based on band-limited devices ...

Lobachevsky University scientists in search of fast algorithms for discrete optimization ...

High-Performance Computing cuts particle collision data prep time ...

TOP500

High performance computer MOGON II at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz among the 100 fastest supercomputers in the world ...

The Cloud

HPE unveils industryis first SaaS-based multi-Cloud management solution for on-premises and public Clouds ...

AccelStor revs up NeoSapphire all-flash array portfolio for next generation Cloud application ...