Primeur magazine

Edition: weekly - Issue: 2020-01-06

Focus

At the e-IRG Open Workshop in Helsinki, Finland,Primeur Magazinehad the opportunity to talk with Kimmo Koski about EuroHPC. Since 2004, Kimmo Koski is the Managing Director at CSC, the Finnish IT Center for Science. Before that, he gained experience at Nokia. In the nineties, he was also at CSC when he was responsible for research infrastructures. In 1989, CSC had a staff of 30 people but now this has grown to 400 people. Read further...

Quantum computing

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a quantum chemistry simulation benchmark to evaluate the performance of quantum devices and guide the development of applications for future quantum computers. Read further...
Imagine a world where people could only talk to their next-door neighbour, and messages must be passed house to house to reach far destinations. Until now, this has been the situation for the bits of hardware that make up a silicon quantum computer, a type of quantum computer with the potential to be cheaper and more versatile than today's versions. Read further...
A nationwide alliance of national labs, universities, and industry has launched to advance the frontiers of quantum computing systems designed to solve urgent scientific challenges and maintain US leadership in next-generation information technology. The Quantum Information Edge strategic alliance is led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. Read further...

Focus on Europe

For the first time, LEGO has been cooled to the lowest temperature possible in an experiment which reveals a new use for the popular toy - the development of quantum computing. A figure and four blocks were placed inside the most effective refrigerator in the world, capable of reaching 1,6 millidegrees above absolute zero (minus 273,15 Centigrade), which is about 200.000 times colder than room temperature and 2000 times colder than deep space. Read further...

Middleware

Researchers across the scientific spectrum crave data, as it is essential to understanding the natural world and, by extension, accelerating scientific progress. Lately, however, the tools of scientific endeavor have become so powerful that the amount of data obtained from experiments and observations is often unwieldy. Read further...

Hardware

The High-Performance Storage System (HPSS) at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) will soon transition to a project-based directory structure. This may sound like a small change, but for research teams storing their project data on HPSS, the update promises to simplify file management and streamline searching for (or sharing) the right data. Read further...
GIGABYTE Technology Co. Ltd. brings world class hardware expertise and solution know-how, along with a selection of ready-to-deploy applications to CES 2020. Read further...
Titan, the groundbreaking Cray XK7 supercomputer operated by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was officially decommissioned on August 1, 2019. The petascale machine ran countless simulations over its 7 years of service, and its sheer computational power was consistently in demand by researchers. But for a brief window, just prior to Titan's decommissioning, only one simulation was running. Read further...
When the Cray XK7 Titan supercomputer was finally decommissioned on August 1, 2019 after 7 years of faithful service, it had successfully executed a total of 2,8 million jobs for scientists around the world. Running simulations through the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers utilized Titan's parallel-computing process to make new advances in modelling everything from supernovae to intrinsically disordered proteins. Read further...

Applications

On a hillside above Stanford University, the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory operates a scientific instrument nearly 2 miles long. In this giant accelerator, a stream of electrons flows through a vacuum pipe, as bursts of microwave radiation nudge the particles ever-faster forward until their velocity approaches the speed of light, creating a powerful beam that scientists from around the world use to probe the atomic and molecular structures of inorganic and biological materials. Read further...
An international joint research team led by the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) succeeded in fabricating a neuromorphic network composed of numerous metallic nanowires. Using this network, the team was able to generate electrical characteristics similar to those associated with higher order brain functions unique to humans, such as memorization, learning, forgetting, becoming alert and returning to calm. The team then clarified the mechanisms that induced these electrical characteristics. Read further...
When nuclear radiation hits electronics, it cuts through semiconductors, leaving scars of charged particles that can flip computing bits and corrupt memory circuits, potentially disabling devices or causing erratic errors. Read further...
Researchers working on an Army-funded project have developed an algorithm to simulate how electromagnetic waves interact with materials in devices to create equipment more efficiently and accurately. The algorithm could be used in a wide range of fields - from biology and astronomy to military applications and telecommunications. Read further...
The American Institute of Physics (AIP) has announced Paul Ginsparg, a professor at Cornell University and founder of arXiv, as the winner of AIP's 2020 Karl Taylor Compton Medal for Leadership in Physics. Named after prominent physicist Karl Taylor Compton, the medal is presented by AIP every four years to highly distinguished physicists like Paul Ginsparg who have made outstanding contributions through exceptional statesmanship in physics. Read further...
Scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have discovered a way to detect the molecular mechanism by which 5HT3A, a serotonin receptor located at the neuron synapse, is activated. Having a molecular model of this activation will allow the testing of pharmaceuticals inhibitors using computer models instead of traditional experiments, potentially reducing the cost and time of screening new drugs. Read further...
In 1934, physicist Ernest Rutherford and his colleagues produced the first fusion reaction - the fusing of light nuclei to release energy - in a laboratory by converting deuterium, a heavy hydrogen isotope, to helium. Since then, scientists have built increasingly efficient fusion energy devices with a goal to achieve net fusion energy, or useable power. Today, the world's largest fusion experiment is being built by seven international members, including the United States. The ITER fusion facility is expected to produce 10 times more power than the thermal power required to heat the plasma, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of commercial-scale fusion power. Read further...